Wigmore Hall

The complex harmonies of a classical triad

The lives of Fauré, Saint-Saëns andRavel were heavily intertwined and interdependent. Jessica Duchen reveals how the three composers were key to each other's success

Monkemeyer/Rimmer, Wigmore Hall

Orchestral musicians are very like squaddies and schoolchildren, most notably in their penchant for ya-boo jokes: witness their puerile digs about the poor sods who play that instrumental Cinderella, the viola.

Charles Owen, Wigmore Hall, London

There's a new batch of thirtysomething British pianists now making waves, and Charles Owen is prominent among them, so it was no surprise to see leading pianists in his audience at the Wigmore.

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Ingrid Fliter/Temirzhan Yerzhanov, Wigmore Hall, London

Live lunchtime broadcasts from the Wigmore Hall have a pleasant fizz. And with the brilliant young Buenos Aires pianist Ingrid Fliter, whose debut disc took the musical world by storm last year, we seemed in for a treat. Launching into Chopin's Grande Valse Brillante Op 18, she delivered its twists and turns with bewitchingly evanescent charm. Reaching the showy conclusion, however, she faltered, banged a note, got up and looked into the piano's works, shrugged apologetically, and walked out.