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One of that select band of British pianists to achieve international recognition, Bernard Roberts was in constant demand as a recitalist, chamber musician, accompanist, concerto soloist and teacher. He was acclaimed by audiences and critics, the remarkable breadth of his industry bringing greater recognition for the instrument itself and proving pivotal in inspiring generations of aspiring performers.

Joyce DiDonato/ David Zobel, Wigmore Hall

When the language of love is Italian there are countless different ways of saying “Amore”.

Simon Keenlyside/ Malcolm Martineau, Wigmore Hall, London

It was during the Hugo Wolf setting of Mörike’s “An eine Äolsharfe” (“To an Aeolian Harp”) in this marvellous Simon Keenlyside/ Malcolm Martineau recital that it became clear that the ever-delicate art of lieder singing had hit some kind of high, not just for this evening but for the craft in general.

Simon Keenlyside / Malcolm Martineau, Wigmore Hall

It was during the Hugo Wolf setting of Mörike’s “An eine Äolsharfe” (“To an Aeolian Harp”) in this marvellous Simon Keenlyside/ Malcolm Martineau recital that it became clear that the ever-delicate art of lieder singing had hit some kind of high, not just for this evening but for the craft in general. It really doesn’t get a whole lot better.

Observations: Just too many anniversaries

Time was when a composer's centenary felt like a significant event, but these days anniversaries are ten-a-penny, because they're such a wonderful crutch for programmers to lean on. When in doubt – and today's programmers at the BBC, South Bank, Barbican, etc are chronically in doubt – reach for a 100th, 150th, or 350th. It can be a birth or a death, so we're in for two doses of Mahler, whose birth 150 years ago is being celebrated this year, and whose death in 1911 will doubtless be commemorated next year.

Borodin Quartet, Wigmore Hall

The Borodin Quartet brings a lot of history to the table – 60 years, to be precise. Personnel may come and go, the balance of personalities may shift, but the identity remains resolutely intact.

Andras Schiff/Juliane Banse, Wigmore Hall, London

If Mendelssohn’s centenary has exposed his deficiencies as a choral composer and symphonist, it has also highlighted his wonderful and underrated gift as a song composer.

La Boh&egrave;me, Royal Opera House, London<br/>Melvyn Tan, Wigmore Hall, London

This dusty, busty dowager is only propped up by tradition

Haydn/Holloway/Janacek/Mendelssohn, Endellion String Quartet, Wigmore Hall, London

Like the filled-in gaps in shattered Greek pots, posthumous completions of works by great composers create a queasy effect: the listener looks for the joins, and wonders about the "authenticity" of what has been added. Composer Robin Holloway’s Greek pot consists of the fragmentary remains of the last quartet Haydn embarked upon: two middle movements minus their outer cladding. But Holloway has mercifully abjured the hubristic route of speculative reconstruction: instead he has ‘framed’ the fragment, ingeniously welding in a little clue which Haydn left behind.

Concordia/Daneman/Gilchrist/Williams, Wigmore Hall, London

Considering the hoo-ha surrounding any new work today, be it never so brief, it’s odd that so little account is taken of the forgotten works which period-performance groups dust off and bring to a high sheen, year after year.

Ingrid Fliter/Temirzhan Yerzhanov, Wigmore Hall, London

Live lunchtime broadcasts from the Wigmore Hall have a pleasant fizz. And with the brilliant young Buenos Aires pianist Ingrid Fliter, whose debut disc took the musical world by storm last year, we seemed in for a treat. Launching into Chopin's Grande Valse Brillante Op 18, she delivered its twists and turns with bewitchingly evanescent charm. Reaching the showy conclusion, however, she faltered, banged a note, got up and looked into the piano's works, shrugged apologetically, and walked out.

Michael Church: Fliter, Tchetuev, Yerzhanov - plus dead piano

When three young pianists tackle major works by Schumann at the Wigmore Hall on successive days, comparisons are mandatory. First up was the Kazakh pianist Temirzhan Yerzhanov, supported by a big cohort of his compatriots, who gave us eight pieces from Schumann’s "Bunte Blatter" plus his Piano Sonata No 1, followed by Prokofiev’s "Visions Fugitives" and Piano Sonata no 2.

Ingrid Fliter, Wigmore Hall, London

Live lunchtime broadcasts from the Wigmore Hall have a pleasant fizz.

Temirzhan Yerzhanov, Wigmore Hall, London

When two young pianists tackle major works by Schumann in the same hall on successive days, comparisons are mandatory.

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