News

Readings will make it hard for Canadian to fulfil his pledge to keep rates on hold until 2016

Film: The Big Picture: An image of war without its guilt

Resurrection Man is about violence - its irrationality and its glamour. The picture is set in 1975 Belfast, and though the fashions and the music are grimly familiar, the city is not. In keeping with the stylised tone of the novel by Eoin McNamee, who also wrote the screenplay, this is Belfast re-imagined in the style of a penny dreadful. An eerie mist rolls through the streets in daylight, enveloping street corner preachers and gossipy mums with creaky prams; at night, the city comes alive with sordid eruptions of colour. A banana yellow Ford Escort caught under glaring street lights and the jet of blood from a punctured artery carry the same garish shock.

Interview: John Bird: From the street to City Hall: the first mayor of London?

Until now, the only hat definitely in the ring for Mayor of London has been Jeffrey Archer's shiny topper. His campaign team is already chasing about glad-handing anyone in sight. The rest of the possible party candidates are more circumspect - won't say yes and won't say no. But putative Tory rivals include Chris Patten, Steven Norris, Alan Clarke, David Mellor. On the Labour side candidates may be Ken Livingstone, Glenda Jackson, Margaret Hodge, Tony Banks, and The Independent's own Trevor Phillips. Then there are a few non-party names - Fred Housego, Richard Branson and Peter Stringfellow.

Film: Reality shot to pieces

the big picture

Interview: Ray Winstone: `Everyone thinks they're a goodie - even Hitler did'

From vicious thug in `Scum' to vicious wife-beater in `Ladybird, Ladybird' to vicious crook in `Face' - Ray Winstone is the hard man of British cinema. His latest film, `Nil by Mouth', casts him true to form but, he tells Ryan Gilbey, he's dying to play a nice guy

Obituary: Oscar Lewenstein

A theatre manager needs to make money. An artistic director is apt to lose it for him. One is a realist, the other an idealist. The theatrical producer Oscar Lewenstein was both.

Books: Why this is Hell, and I'm out of it

PLEASE KILL ME: The Uncensored Oral History of Punk by Legs McNeil & Gillian McCain, Little, Brown pounds 18.99

Long live England! Vive l'entente cordiale!

One annual French film festival entirely devoted to British cinema would be a curiosity; to stage two is a welcome aberration. Dinard and Cherbourg, just 150 kilometres apart along the north coast of France, both hold Britfests each autumn. Cherbourg has been around for longer, but Dinard (at least the locals claim) is the bigger deal. Whatever the case, during the long slump from which our cinema is gingerly emerging, the organisers must have often wondered if there were enough new films to go around.

FILM: Video monthly

A guide to the best new releases

THE BUSINESS

Twenty bands and artists may have worked their hides off to get the Bosnian aid album Help! completed in 24 hours, and the album may have sold 71,000 copies in a day, dwarfing the entire week's sales of every other album in the charts, but you won't see it at number one. Chart regulator CIN maintains that Help! counts as a compilation and is therefore ineligible for entry in the main album charts. Some voices have even suggested that Parlophone was responsible for bringing the matter to CIN's attention (the label released Blur's new album two days after Help!). The real winners, though, are the Levellers. Thanks to Help's exclusion, they've got a number one album. A bit odd, seeing as how everyone hates them. Still, nice to see the under-talented, as well as the under-privileged, profiting from such a noble project.

Obituary: Alan Barton

Alan Lesley Barton, singer, songwriter: born Barnsley 16 September 1953; married twice (three sons); died Cologne 23 March 1995.

Football: Sharpest tactical brain: Brian Moore on the day that Bobby Moore led England to victory in the 1966 World Cup

ON that sunlit day in July 1966, the one we all remember so well, I was sitting with Alan Clarke, my fellow radio commentator, with one of those large, old-fashioned lip microphones wrapped around our faces.

ARTS / Show People: Mr Orange's true colours: 57. Tim Roth

'A BIT of a lad' is what I'd been told to expect, and at first sight Tim Roth doesn't seem likely to disappoint. The playground swagger, the jeans and biker boots, the bottled lager he pours - it looks like a calculated affront to the commodious splendour of his Savoy Hotel suite. They won't let you in the bar in jeans, but who cares when room service can bring the bar to you? As it turns out, Roth is relaxed, articulate and friendly, his only concession to laddishness this afternoon is a loud belch, and that at least keeps the photographer amused.
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Kenny Ireland, pictured in 2010.
peopleActor, from House of Cards and Benidorm, was 68
News
A scene from the video shows students mock rioting
newsEnd-of-year leaver's YouTube film features staging of a playground gun massacre
Travel
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Environment
View from the Llanberis Track to the mountain lake Llyn
Du’r Arddu
environmentA large chunk of Mount Snowdon, in north Wales, is up for sale
Voices
A family sit and enjoy a quiet train journey
voicesForcing us to overhear dull phone conversations is an offensive act, says Simon Kelner
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i100This Instagram photo does not prove Russian army is in Ukraine
Arts and Entertainment
The cast of The Big Bang Theory in a still from the show
tvBig Bang Theory filming delayed by contract dispute over actors' pay
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Morrissey pictured in 2013
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Arts and Entertainment
The Secret Cinema performance of Back to the Future has been cancelled again
filmReview: Sometimes the immersive experience was so good it blurred the line between fiction and reality
Arts and Entertainment
Sydney and Melbourne are locked in a row over giant milk crates
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

In my grandfather's footsteps

5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

Martha Stewart has flying robot

The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

A tale of two presidents

George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

The dining car makes a comeback

Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

Gallery rage

How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices
Could our smartphones soon be diagnosing diseases via Health Kit and Google Fit?

Could smartphones soon be diagnosing diseases?

Health Kit and Google Fit have been described as "the beginning of a health revolution"
Ryanair has turned on the 'charm offensive' but can we learn to love the cut-price carrier again?

Can we learn to love Ryanair again?

Four recent travellers give their verdicts on the carrier's improved customer service