Arts and Entertainment Glenn Close as Cruella de Vil

Will the 101 Dalmatians villain finally manage to craft the coat she so desires?

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking Glass, By Lewis Carroll

As with so many of the excellent Oxford World's Classics, this new edition has the reader oscillating between text and annotation.

Album: Faryl, Wonderland (Decca)

For her second album, the young mezzo-soprano has tried to develop an overall theme, loosely based around Alice In Wonderland, though listeners may struggle to discern a trace of it.

Michael Sheen: 'I am officially the king of Hollywood'

On stage and screen, Michael Sheen has made his mark by breathing new life into cultural icons; now he's turning his gaze away from real life and towards fantasy.

Think small not mall: Ditch contemporary retail and head for the bijou boutique

A purring machine" is Emile Zola's description of the vast, ruthlessly contrived department store at the centre of his 19th-century novel The Ladies' Paradise, which charts the early stages of our now full-blown love affair with shopping.

Terence Blacker: Britain's green and pleasant divided land

Because politicians only occasionally take into consideration what is happening in the British countryside, rural policies and initiatives, when they do come, often have an other-worldly, Alice in Wonderland feel to them.

Channel 4 boss brands BBC 'Stalinist' over relocation cost

The chairman of Channel 4 has branded the BBC as a "Stalinist" organisation with an "Alice in Wonderland" business strategy, after it emerged that the corporation's move of some of its operations to a new base in Salford has been budgeted at £876m.

Urban fantasy: Interior designer Abigail Ahern has brought a touch of 'Alice in Wonderland' to her London home

Within an unassuming Victorian house on a quiet London street, Abigail Ahern's fox terrier, Molly, is sprawled across the stone living-room floor. On the ground beside her stands a sculpture of a monster's foot, almost as big as she is. At the other end of the room, perched on a 15-foot horizontal oak beam lodged at chest height between the two main walls, is a fibreglass elf, the size of a child. The space between them is a cacophony of furnishings and memorabilia – all different colours, shapes and textures – set against high, inky-grey walls.

Tom Sutcliffe: 3D movies are all an illusion

Possibly the greatest 3D effect in cinema history dates from 1895 – the year that the Lumière brothers first started showing their short "actualités" to the French public and the year in which "Train arrival in the station of La Ciotat" – a simple fixed shot of a steam train pulling into a provincial station – reportedly had audiences flinching backwards in their seats in alarm. What the Lumière brothers had inadvertently demonstrated is that cinema was – from its very inception – a three-dimensional art form, one in which you can never guarantee that an image will stay inertly fixed to the sheet on which it is projected. Mere tricks of perspective are the very least of it too, because within a matter of years other film-makers had demonstrated that infinitely more potent things could be made to jut from the picture plane and touch an audience that might have assumed that it was looking on from a safe distance. The train only looked as if it was about to roll into our space. But human sympathy and desire and sorrow really did cross the gap between screen and auditorium and hit the audience where they could feel it.

Still flying high: Skellig comes to the small screen

I found him in the garage on a Sunday afternoon,” is the opening sentence of David Almond’s Skellig, an opening gambit destined to sit in the collective memory along with the first lines of Alice in Wonderland and The Hobbit. The line, Almond says, just popped into his head one day as he walked down the street. “As I began to write it down,” he said, “it almost seemed to write itself.”

Carnival time in Rio

A golden Queen Cleopatra bathing in milk, a female dancer pushing the limits of Carnival tolerance, and the high-kicking Moulin Rouge troupe kept 70,000 spectators in Rio's Sambadrome buzzing through to dawn.

Bites: Golden tart for Christmas, anyone?

While the credit-crunched masses might be revelling in the bittersweet prospect of a closing-down sale at Woolies this Christmas, the restaurant industry seems slightly out of tune with the times.

One Minute With: Cecelia Ahern

Gatland fears 'soap opera' as Welsh refuse to sing in unison

Warren Gatland isn't sure whether he is coming or going. No sooner was he confirmed as the Lions forwards coach for next summer's tour to South Africa than he was talking about the huge challenge posed by the Springboks. The tourists would have seven weeks to gel in their mission to beat the world champions on the high veld.

Archbishop slams City 'bank robbers'

Traders who cashed in on falling share prices in troubled bank HBOS were branded "bank robbers" and "asset strippers" by the Archbishop of York.

News
The Banksy image in Folkestone before it was vandalised
people
Life and Style
tech

Sales of the tablet are set to fall again, say analysts

Sport
football West Brom vs Man Utd match report: Blind grabs point, but away form a problem for Van Gaal
Arts and Entertainment
Gotham is coming to UK shores this autumn
tvGotham, episode 2, review
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Bloom Time: Mira Sorvino
tvMira Sorvino on leaving movie roles for 'The Intruders'
News
First woman: Valentina Tereshkova
peopleNASA guinea pig Kate Greene thinks it might fly
News
Brian Harvey turned up at Downing Street today demanding to speak to the Prime Minister
news

Met Police confirm there was a 'minor disturbance' and that no-one was arrested

Arts and Entertainment
George Lucas poses with a group of Star Wars-inspired Disney characters at Disney's Hollywood Studios in 2010
films

George Lucas criticises the major Hollywood film studios

Voices
Chris Grayling, Justice Secretary: 'There are pressures which we are facing but there is not a crisis'
voices

Does Chris Grayling realise what a vague concept he is dealing with?

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Vietnam & Cambodia
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Berlin, Dresden, Meissen & Colditz
Prices correct as of 17 October 2014
Two super-sized ships have cruised into British waters, but how big can these behemoths get?

Super-sized ships: How big can they get?

Two of the largest vessels in the world cruised into UK waters last week
British doctors on brink of 'cure' for paralysis with spinal cord treatment

British doctors on brink of cure for paralysis

Sufferers can now be offered the possibility of cure thanks to a revolutionary implant of regenerative cells
Ranked seventh in world’s best tourist cities - not London, or Edinburgh, but Salisbury

Salisbury ranked seventh in world’s best tourist cities

The city is home to one of the four surviving copies of the Magna Carta, along with the world’s oldest mechanical clock
Let's talk about loss

We need to talk about loss

Secrecy and silence surround stillbirth
Will there be an all-female mission to Mars?

Will there be an all-female mission to Mars?

Women may be better suited to space travel than men are
Oscar Pistorius sentencing: The athlete's wealth and notoriety have provoked a long overdue debate on South African prisons

'They poured water on, then electrified me...'

If Oscar Pistorius is sent to jail, his experience will not be that of other inmates
James Wharton: The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

Life after the Army has brought new battles for the LGBT activist James Wharton
Ebola in the US: Panic over the virus threatens to infect President Obama's midterms

Panic over Ebola threatens to infect the midterms

Just one person has died, yet November's elections may be affected by what Republicans call 'Obama's Katrina', says Rupert Cornwell
Premier League coaches join the RSC to swap the tricks of their trades

Darling, you were fabulous! But offside...

Premier League coaches are joining the RSC to learn acting skills, and in turn they will teach its actors to play football. Nick Clark finds out why
How to dress with authority: Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear

How to dress with authority

Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear
New book on Joy Division's Ian Curtis sheds new light on the life of the late singer

New book on Ian Curtis sheds fresh light on the life of the late singer

'Joy Division were making art... Ian was for real' says author Jon Savage
Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

The Bafta-winner talks Hollywood, being branded a psycho, and how Barbra Streisand is his true inspiration
Tim Minchin, interview: The musician, comedian and world's favourite ginger is on scorching form

Tim Minchin interview

For a no-holds-barred comedian who is scathing about woolly thinking and oppressive religiosity, he is surprisingly gentle in person
Boris Johnson's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Boris's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Many of us Brits still disapprove of conspicuous consumption – it's the way we were raised, says DJ Taylor
Ash frontman Tim Wheeler reveals how he came to terms with his father's dementia

Tim Wheeler: Alzheimer's, memories and my dad

Wheeler's dad suffered from Alzheimer's for three years. When he died, there was only one way the Ash frontman knew how to respond: with a heartfelt solo album