Arts and Entertainment Glenn Close as Cruella de Vil

Will the 101 Dalmatians villain finally manage to craft the coat she so desires?

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking Glass, By Lewis Carroll

As with so many of the excellent Oxford World's Classics, this new edition has the reader oscillating between text and annotation.

Album: Faryl, Wonderland (Decca)

For her second album, the young mezzo-soprano has tried to develop an overall theme, loosely based around Alice In Wonderland, though listeners may struggle to discern a trace of it.

Michael Sheen: 'I am officially the king of Hollywood'

On stage and screen, Michael Sheen has made his mark by breathing new life into cultural icons; now he's turning his gaze away from real life and towards fantasy.

Think small not mall: Ditch contemporary retail and head for the bijou boutique

A purring machine" is Emile Zola's description of the vast, ruthlessly contrived department store at the centre of his 19th-century novel The Ladies' Paradise, which charts the early stages of our now full-blown love affair with shopping.

Terence Blacker: Britain's green and pleasant divided land

Because politicians only occasionally take into consideration what is happening in the British countryside, rural policies and initiatives, when they do come, often have an other-worldly, Alice in Wonderland feel to them.

Channel 4 boss brands BBC 'Stalinist' over relocation cost

The chairman of Channel 4 has branded the BBC as a "Stalinist" organisation with an "Alice in Wonderland" business strategy, after it emerged that the corporation's move of some of its operations to a new base in Salford has been budgeted at £876m.

Urban fantasy: Interior designer Abigail Ahern has brought a touch of 'Alice in Wonderland' to her London home

Within an unassuming Victorian house on a quiet London street, Abigail Ahern's fox terrier, Molly, is sprawled across the stone living-room floor. On the ground beside her stands a sculpture of a monster's foot, almost as big as she is. At the other end of the room, perched on a 15-foot horizontal oak beam lodged at chest height between the two main walls, is a fibreglass elf, the size of a child. The space between them is a cacophony of furnishings and memorabilia – all different colours, shapes and textures – set against high, inky-grey walls.

Tom Sutcliffe: 3D movies are all an illusion

Possibly the greatest 3D effect in cinema history dates from 1895 – the year that the Lumière brothers first started showing their short "actualités" to the French public and the year in which "Train arrival in the station of La Ciotat" – a simple fixed shot of a steam train pulling into a provincial station – reportedly had audiences flinching backwards in their seats in alarm. What the Lumière brothers had inadvertently demonstrated is that cinema was – from its very inception – a three-dimensional art form, one in which you can never guarantee that an image will stay inertly fixed to the sheet on which it is projected. Mere tricks of perspective are the very least of it too, because within a matter of years other film-makers had demonstrated that infinitely more potent things could be made to jut from the picture plane and touch an audience that might have assumed that it was looking on from a safe distance. The train only looked as if it was about to roll into our space. But human sympathy and desire and sorrow really did cross the gap between screen and auditorium and hit the audience where they could feel it.

Still flying high: Skellig comes to the small screen

I found him in the garage on a Sunday afternoon,” is the opening sentence of David Almond’s Skellig, an opening gambit destined to sit in the collective memory along with the first lines of Alice in Wonderland and The Hobbit. The line, Almond says, just popped into his head one day as he walked down the street. “As I began to write it down,” he said, “it almost seemed to write itself.”

Carnival time in Rio

A golden Queen Cleopatra bathing in milk, a female dancer pushing the limits of Carnival tolerance, and the high-kicking Moulin Rouge troupe kept 70,000 spectators in Rio's Sambadrome buzzing through to dawn.

Bites: Golden tart for Christmas, anyone?

While the credit-crunched masses might be revelling in the bittersweet prospect of a closing-down sale at Woolies this Christmas, the restaurant industry seems slightly out of tune with the times.

One Minute With: Cecelia Ahern

Gatland fears 'soap opera' as Welsh refuse to sing in unison

Warren Gatland isn't sure whether he is coming or going. No sooner was he confirmed as the Lions forwards coach for next summer's tour to South Africa than he was talking about the huge challenge posed by the Springboks. The tourists would have seven weeks to gel in their mission to beat the world champions on the high veld.

Archbishop slams City 'bank robbers'

Traders who cashed in on falling share prices in troubled bank HBOS were branded "bank robbers" and "asset strippers" by the Archbishop of York.

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Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

The President came the nearest he has come yet to rivalling George W Bush’s gormless reaction to 9/11 , says Robert Fisk
Ebola outbreak: Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on the virus

Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on Ebola

A Christian charity’s efforts to save missionaries trapped in Africa by the crisis have been justifiably praised. But doubts remain about its evangelical motives
Jeremy Clarkson 'does not see a problem' with his racist language on Top Gear, says BBC

Not even Jeremy Clarkson is bigger than the BBC, says TV boss

Corporation’s head of television confirms ‘Top Gear’ host was warned about racist language
Nick Clegg the movie: Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise

Nick Clegg the movie

Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise
Philip Larkin: Misogynist, racist, miserable? Or caring, playful man who lived for others?

Philip Larkin: What will survive of him?

Larkin's reputation has taken a knocking. But a new book by James Booth argues that the poet was affectionate, witty, entertaining and kind, as hitherto unseen letters, sketches and 'selfies' reveal
Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?

Waxing lyrical

Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?
Texas forensic astronomer finally pinpoints the exact birth of impressionism

Revealed (to the minute)

The precise time when impressionism was born
From slow-roasted to sugar-cured: how to make the most of the British tomato season

Make the most of British tomatoes

The British crop is at its tastiest and most abundant. Sudi Pigott shares her favourite recipes
10 best men's skincare products

Face it: 10 best men's skincare products

Oscar Quine cleanses, tones and moisturises to find skin-savers blokes will be proud to display on the bathroom shelf
Malky Mackay allegations: Malky Mackay, Iain Moody and another grim day for English football

Mackay, Moody and another grim day for English football

The latest shocking claims do nothing to dispel the image that some in the game on these shores exist in a time warp, laments Sam Wallace
La Liga analysis: Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

Pete Jenson starts his preview of the Spanish season, which begins on Saturday, by explaining how Fifa’s transfer ban will affect the Catalans
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape