Arts and Entertainment

Pensioners ape 'Rocky', 'Titanic', 'Bond' and more

Obituary: Frances Lang

Frances Lang, who died last week aged 34, first appeared in the foyer of the Independent on Sunday in the winter of 1993, when she was a photography student at the Newport School of Art and Design. She held a box of colour Xeroxes of portraits of young women chefs. She had, somehow, captured the face of a new authority in commercial kitchens. Her series of photographs was published in the Sunday Review, immediately serialised in Germany and imitated in Australia and the United States.

Shopping: Six of the best hats for Ascot

1Stripy straw hat, pounds 350. Move in the right circles wearing Lucy Barlow's black and stone stitched straw hat. Although by appointment only, Lucy's workshop-cum-showroom has a very friendly atmosphere. Lucy Barlow, 14 Portobello Green, London W10. Call 0171-968 5333.

Bridges in Tokyo

AUDREY HEPBURN'S NECK by Alan Brown, Sceptre pounds 9.99

Packaging evil as splatter-pulp There's got to be more to it than this, says Pete Davies

The Evil that Men Do by Brian Masters Doubleday, pounds 16.99: Harmful neurotics, silly saints and nasty passages from the classics.

in here: Deaf as a post

My hearing is generally quite selective, a trick I developed to cope with being abused by teenagers in my previous incarnation as a teacher.

The belle curve: why all men love a waistline (allegedly)

Psychologists have defined the shape of beauty, writes Anna Maxted

THEATRE / Critic's Choice

The Children's Hour Clare Higgins and Harriet Walter are considerably more than substitutes for Shirley MacLaine and Audrey Hepburn in the Hollywood version. Lillian Hellman's powerful drama of love and betrayal closes soon. Hurry.

MUSIC: An engaging tone: Stephen Johnson on a MacMillan premiere, a Mahler First and a Tilson Thomas double act reprise from the LSO at the Barbican in London

If you were one of the great British privatised industries and wanted to commission an orchestral 'celebration', who would you get to write it? Not, surely, a Catholic / socialist / nationalist Scotsman. But BT did: they chose James MacMillan, and in Britannia they got what they deserved.

The Angela Lambert Interview: Her toughest role was playing herself: First she was a debutante, then a radical political activist who disowned her upper-crust family. Now actress Harriet Walter has at last found fulfilment as a dutiful daughter

It is a sad, or perhaps a liberating, reflection on modern life that few people are keen to talk about their parents. At best they make dutiful acknowledgement of their love and support, but many prefer to skip the subject of their childhood. Never, until I met Harriet Walter, had anyone insisted that her, or his, most important and nourishing relationships were those with the inner circle of the family - meaning not husband or children, for Ms Walter has never married, but her parents and elder sister.

BOOK REVIEW / The innocent abroad: Audrey: Her Real Story by Alexander Walker: Weidenfeld pounds 18.99

HARDLY anyone has a bad word to say about Audrey Hepburn. It's true that Humphrey Bogart was no admirer (he resented being upstaged by the handsome William Holden when he starred with her in Sabrina Fair) and that Hitchcock never forgave her for reneging on a contract to play a rape victim in one of his manipulative little dramas, but otherwise all is sweetness and light. She was not just a doe-eyed beauty who caused journalists to overdose on the word gamine, but singularly well behaved: no tantrums, no drugs, not much booze and only two and a half husbands. After the vamps and demons Alexander Walker has written about in the past (Garbo, Dietrich, Joan Crawford, Bette Davis), she must have been uphill work. You can't blame him for rattling the one exciting skeleton he does find in her cupboard, the trace of a Nazi connection.

Obituary: George Peppard

George Peppard, actor, director, producer: born Detroit 1 October 1928; six times married (two sons, one daughter); died Los Angeles 8 May 1994.

LIVES OF THE GREAT SONGS / Of innocence and experience: How Long Has This Been Going On? It's been a standard for half a century, but at first it was a resounding flop. Rhoda Koenig continues our series

THE FIRST time I heard 'How Long Has This Been Going On?' it made an impression very different from the one George and Ira Gershwin intended. I was listening to the record of Judy Garland's 23 April 1961 appearance at Carnegie Hall. She was greeted by the most hysterical adulation of her comeback tour, and her intensity matched it. I assumed that the song concerned adultery, and that the title was the question of a heartbroken wife. The lines 'Kiss me once, then once more/What a dunce I was before]' seemed to support this: the wife confusedly asking her faithless husband for comfort, while berating herself for not noticing the obvious signs. Garland's breathiness as she leaned into the 'How', and the agony with which she gobbled up the final phrases over the pianist's staccato attack convinced me that this was a song about misery and betrayal.

Bunhill: Failed takeover

LORD HANSON'S lawyers have reportedly been crawling all over a book published last week about his one-time fiancee, Audrey Hepburn. They will not have found anything too juicy in Sheridan Morley's Audrey Hepburn: a celebration (Pavilion Books, pounds 14.99), but it does add a little flesh to the much mentioned but little investigated relationship.

Opinions: Would Fergie have made a good UN ambassador?

CAPTAIN ROLIE, charter helicopter pilot: Certainly not. Just who does she think she is? I absolutely loathe her, she's a fox, she's no more a duchess than my foot. She probably put herself for it because she wanted some free flights. Audrey Hepburn was class, she was divine.
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