News March 1974: Hiroo Onoda (2nd left) walking from the jungle where he had hidden since World War II. Onoda has died at the age of 91

Second Lt. Onoda, who finally surrendered in 1974, has died at the age of 91

Backpacker wrote letters of farewell

The British backpacker who survived 12 days in the Australian outback wrote goodbye letters to his family, fearing he would not be rescued. Jamie Neale told 60 Minutes: "I was thinking I might die on that mountain."

Bush survivor discusses ordeal

Jamie Neale said thinking about his mother kept him going through the 12-day ordeal when he was lost in the bush.

Backpacker stays in hospital

A "back from the dead" backpacker who was lost in the Australian bush for 12 days could be discharged from hospital tomorrow.

Backpacker who came back from the dead... to a scolding

Teenage Briton emerges to face his father after 12 days lost in Aussie bush

Redundant City high-flyers take their money and run

Having brought the world to its knees, redundancy-hit city workers are suddenly heading off to actually see some of it, and they're taking their pay-offs with them. Many newly redundant "extrava-gappers" are putting down their P45s and picking up their passports for long, expensive breaks, says lifestyle management company WhiteConcierge.

Go with the flow: Ride volcanoes

Surfing started with big waves and wooden boards. Then it moved on to ski slopes and sand dunes. But those are nothing compared to the latest thrill – riding active volcanoes. Simon Usborne reports

Jeff in Venice, Death in Varanasi, by Geoff Dyer

If ever there was a book of two halves, it is this, Geoff Dyer's first novel for over a decade. His last fictional excursion (though for Dyer the division is largely artificial) was Paris, Trance, a druggy elegy for 90s romanticism that was partly a reworking of Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises.

I forgive her killer, says backpacker's father

Life sentence for teenage New Zealander guilty of killing British tourist

Gap Year: Stay put and explore the culture

Perhaps the hardest part of taking a gap year is choosing where to go and what to do. The range of projects on offer is overwhelming. Many people overcome this by booking round-the-world tickets and trying to go everywhere and do everything. It's now common for a gapper to jump from South Africa to Thailand to Australia to Buenos Aires and pass through LA before returning home, having covered six continents in six months.

Players ‘disheartened’ under Keane

Sunderland defender George McCartney has claimed that his team-mates were not happy working for Roy Keane after their former manager spoke for the first time about why he left the club.

Genius moments: February 2008

'Armed police would not fire back. – I wish I'd had a gun, not a camera'

Jerome Taylor talks to the photographer whose picture went around the world

Fossett's wrecked plane found in mountain area

Wreckage found today in California has been identified as the aircraft piloted by adventurer Steve Fossett.

Nigh-No-Place, By Jen Hadfield

The work of Ted Hughes has only recently begun to influence poets in significant numbers, most notably Alice Oswald and now Jen Hadfield, whose Nigh-No-Place is in the running for this year's Forward Prize. Not that Hadfield's restless eco-poetics sound especially like Hughes. There is a backpacker feel to the volume's twin locations of Canada and Shetland, yet the writing is rooted in both places because, for all the comically unflattering self-portraits, the poet usually faces outwards, on to landscapes dazzling after rain or blurred by mist.

Gap year: off into the unknown

High-profile tragedies have made parents wary, but well-planned gap years are worth the risk, says Laura Jones
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Lake Garda
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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent