Arts and Entertainment

Where are you now and what can you see?

I’m at the BBC recording Front Row and apparently I’m looking at a brass bust of Henry Wood. The statue is in the foyer.

Marc Chagall's ‘Jew in Red’ (1915)

Marc Chagall tried many things, but ended up being true only to himself

Plus: Hammond Innes's thrillers whose pages don’t turn themselves and falling asleep during Byzantium

Tan Twan Eng wins Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction with The Garden of Evening Mists

Tan Twan Eng has won the £25,000 Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction with The Garden of Evening Mists, beating double Man Booker winner Hilary Mantel to the title.

Merciless satirist: Tom Sharpe's Porterhouse Blue 'took a four-barrelled elephant gun to the world of Oxbridge'

Porterhouse Blue author Tom Sharpe dies aged 85

John Walsh marks the demise of the writer who found comic gold in the world of Oxbridge

Norwegian language version of the Bible outpaces 'Fifty Shades of Grey' to top bestseller list in one of Europe's most secular countries

Sales of book seen as a sign that the Bible still has resonance in the country

Google Doodle celebrates English furniture designer Thomas Chippendale

18th Century cabinet maker honoured with Doodle

When the Money Runs Out, By Stephen D King. Yale, £20. The Growth Map, By Jim O'Neill. Portfolio Penguin, £10.99

We call it globalisation and it is one of the two great economic stories of our time: that shift of economic power from the old developed world to the new emerging one. The other story is the nasty economic cycle we have just experienced. The two stories are linked because the failures of Western economic management that exacerbated the last recession have sped up the power shift.

Review: Strange Bodies, By Marcel Theroux

Obsession and horror in an eerily plausible modern 'Frankenstein'

The Conversation: Michael Pollan, food writer

'A teacher taught me that cooking is like yoga'

One Minute With: Jane Gardam, novelist

Where are you now and what can you see?

Former Beatle Ringo Starr is to publish a book of his own photos.

Ringo Starr publishes book of unseen photos of The Beatles

Former Beatle Ringo Starr is to publish a book of his own photos, including previously unseen images of the Fab Four.

Author Peter James survived a spectacular car crash last weekend.

Dead Man’s Time author Peter James walks away from spectacular 85mph car crash

The bestselling crime writer Peter James is back in the driving seat after a spectacular crash at Brands Hatch in which suffered cracked ribs and a bruised spleen.

Diary: The Professor’s backing Bayern Munich to beat Borussia Dortmund (‘They’ll win 3-1,’ he says)

Bayern or Borussia? It’s time to take sides. Surely Gisela Stuart, the Bavaria-born Labour MP, can offer expert guidance on which team the neutrals should support in the all-German Champions League Final clash at Wembley.

Brought to book: Natalie Haynes at home, surrounded by Booker contenders

Natalie Haynes: Confessions of a Booker judge

Being on the jury of the Man Booker Prize is no mean feat. With 150 books to read, Natalie Haynes barely has time to sleep. But, she says, the popularity of historical fiction means she now knows a lot more about world history

Sophie Kinsella

Sophie Kinsella on Wedding Night: What if someone deliberately sabotaged your honeymoon?

The queen of Chick Lit explains the motivation behind her latest novel

The bidding war between publishers for Gill Hornbys new novel, 'The Hive' was reportedly vicious

School-gate mums: Is 2013's Fifty Shades a novel by Gill Hornby called The Hive?

We’ve had it up to here with the wizards-and-magic fiction genre. Ditto the romantic-vampires-and-werewolves one.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003