Arts and Entertainment
 

Alex Chinneck's artwork 'Upside Down House' ('Miner on the Moon') has been created as part of the annual Merge Festival in the Bankside area in London.

Labour peer Rogers sets out his vision for an urban revolution

The architect Richard Rogers used his maiden speech in the House of Lords to spell out a plan for revitalising and humanising Britain's cities.

God's Banker: 'He was given Mafia money and he made poor use of it'

For 15 years the mystery of Roberto Calvi's death has been left spectacularly hanging, in much the same way that the body of the Italian banker was found dangling from a piece of scaffolding beneath Blackfriars Bridge in London on the morning of June 18, 1982.

The poison tart

UNNATURAL MURDER by Anne Somerset Weidenfeld pounds 20

Room for a view

Lofty ideals

CURTAIN CALLS: THEATRE

Showstopper

Big firms cut back donations to Tories

Large companies are increasingly refusing to donate money to the Conservative Party but the shortfall is being made up by smaller firms whose donations are not so open to public scrutiny.

Bridge 2000

Imagine it lit up at night: a pencil-thin arc of colour across the Thames. Jonathan Glancey looks forward to a footbridge linking St Paul's Cathedral and the south bank

power some achieve it, some don't

Margaret Thatcher( above) leaving Buckingham Palace after tendering her resignation as Prime Minister to the Queen, 28 November, 1990.Photograph by Steve Morgan: 'She's smiling, but it was a very forced smile. She was crying when she left Downing Street later.' Thatcher in more triumphant mood (right), the day after Chancellor Nigel Lawson resigned: Blackfriars,London, 27 October 1989. Photograph by Peter MacDiarmid: 'It was a typical Thatcher performance, bouncing back, but otherwise it was just a dull day - an office opening at Blackfriars Foundry. As was often the case, though, she used it as a platform to speak. There was a ridiculous media scrum, but I got this picture by shooting right up her nose using a wide-angle lens'

No 84: so you want to know when the train is?; True stories from the Great Railway Disaster

A weekly chronicle of the absurdities caused by the Government's privatisation programme

Peer pressure sparks bust-up at Blackfriars

CITY DIARY

A river runs through it

Will Alsop is passionate about the Thames, and it shows in his proposal to bridge the river with the Institute of Contemporary Art, writes Mel Gooding

Blueprint for Blackfriars

Blueprint for Blackfriars

OBITUARIES : Enid Lakeman

Newspaper letter column editors will henceforth have a much lighter postbag. Few individuals have had greater tenacity for a single cause than Enid Lakeman had for electoral reform over the past 50 years. Her commitment to preferential voting and her ability to apply a rock-solid foundation in theory to the practical opportunity of the moment, serviced by the simple combination of a good press cuttings service and an increasingly battered typewriter, enabled her to produce a swift and sharp resp onse toeach and every electoral nonsense or wayward statement. Not even the most far-flung of local newspapers was immune to a Lakeman thunderbolt. Most of them were so surprised to get a letter from a London office that they printed them.

Labour in Blackpool: Directors enjoy rich pickings from privatisation

DIRECTORS of privatised utilities have enjoyed individual profits of up to pounds 470,000 this year by exercising lucrative share options, writes Barrie Clement.

BR preparing to run expanded strike service: Sixth Wednesday stoppage set to go ahead

BRITISH RAIL is expecting to run more than 20 per cent of the normal train timetable during the sixth 24-hour strike by signal workers, which starts at midnight tonight.
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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine