Voices

The very worst example of wedding greed comes in the form of the wedding gift list, which is a smart name for begging

Inside Story: The 42nd edition of Midem

Midem used to be a bit of a jolly for the music business, especially for staff at the major labels. Networking, wheeling and dealing at Cannes, on the French Riviera, in January? What’s not to like?

Souffleur impresses with Challow victory

In winning the Challow Hurdle at Newbury, Souffleur has some impressive hoofprints to follow. Two seasons ago none other than Denman took the novices' Group One prize, last year it was Wichita Lineman, and before them the likes of Cornish Rebel, Bindaree, Large Action and Bonanza Boy.

Walking on sunshine: It's no surprise that when rug designer Helen Yardley and her husband moved into their light-filled north London home, they decided not to scrimp on the flooring

Our five-bedroom house in Camden, north London, was built in 1851 and we moved in around 10 years ago; our daughter was conceived two weeks after we settled in. I like the living-room because it's very high, light and peaceful, especially after being stuck on the Tube. It has some of my favourite art in it, including something by Hughie O'Donoghue, bought from Purdy Hicks on Hoxton Street - although I normally hate it when people are obsessed with buying named pieces when it's not from the heart.

Sport on TV: ITV wastes its World Cup bonanza with digital overload

It was nice to see a programme in prime time last night setting up the weekend's two titanic confrontations in Paris, writes Chris Maume from a parallel universe in which ITV takes the Rugby World Cup seriously.

Sleeping Beauty, Royal Opera House, London

The Royal Ballet is riding high again

Hard-Fi, Brixton Academy, London<br/> The Gourds, Borderline, Londn

Sons of Staines thrash it out

The Sketch: Civil service chief and a room of 'verbal ectoplasm'

Here's a suggestion for select committee chairmen. Stop asking witnesses: "Would you like to say anything by way of introduction?"

15 years of education planned for all

A £9.4bn bonanza to smarten up primary schools - to be spent over the next five years in rebuilding or refurbishing 8,900 of them - was promised by the Chancellor yesterday.

No Pain, No Gain: Received wisdom fails to predict a pubs bonanza

The stock market, as befits a long established institution, is awash with well-meaning advice, purporting to offer investment guidance. "Never average down" and "Always adopt a strict stop-loss policy" are two of the most widely quoted. Yet anyone who blissfully ignored those two overworked pieces of investor folklore would have made a killing if they had played in the shares of a company in one of the most unfashionable corners of the City.

Racing: Walsh's rodeo ride just fails on Kauto Star

Those who considered that Kauto Star, the favourite for the Arkle Trophy at the Cheltenham Festival, was such a certainty in yesterday's novice chase at Exeter that he could fall over and still win were very nearly right.

Racing: Babodana fulfils a long ambition

The Lincoln Handicap may not seem an obvious must-have for a top Flat jockey, but victory yesterday on Babodana fulfilled a poignant ambition for Philip Robinson. His late father Peter had won the race as a trainer before his untimely death from a heart attack at the age of only 42, and Robinson dearly wanted to add it to his own CV. He did so in some style, sending the Mark Tompkins-trained 20-1 shot ahead from the two-furlong mark to hold on by three-quarters of a length. In a bookies' bonanza in the first major betting heat of the Flat season, Quito, at 50-1, came in second, ahead of Dark Charm (20-1) and Wing Commander (33-1).

Goldman Sachs and Warburg Dillon Reed in line for Vodafone bonanza

Goldman Sachs and Warburg Dillon Reed, the investment banks advising Vodafone, are in line for an pounds 81m win-only fee if the phone firm's hostile bid for Mannesmann succeeds in the face of strong opposition at the target's German HQ.

Outlook: Norman conquest

THERE WERE many promises of instant wealth during the South Sea bubble of the eighteenth century. Investors bought rising stocks no matter how outrageous their design, anticipating lines of idiotic speculators to form behind them eager to gobble up the stock at an even higher price. Financiers, legit and bogus alike, were able to raise money with ease for such preposterous business propositions as "for the trading in hair" and "for a wheel of perpetual motion". Then there was the all time classic of an enterprise "for carrying on an undertaking of great advantage, but nobody to know what it is". It defies belief that anyone could have thought of investing in such a thing, but they did.

Aberdeen's oil bonanza is over as thousands of jobs are axed

ABERDEEN WAS warned yesterday that 10,000 oil and gas jobs could disappear in the next decade.

NTL sees interactive bonanza

THE HYPE surrounding interactive television is set to give way to a multi-billion pound industry early in the next century, the Edinburgh International Television Festival was told.
News
A model of a Neanderthal man on display at the National Museum of Prehistory in Dordogne, France
science
News
Richard Dawkins dedicated his book 'The Greatest Show on Earth' to Josh Timonen
newsThat's Richard Dawkins on babies with Down Syndrome
Arts and Entertainment
Eye of the beholder? 'Concrete lasagne' Preston bus station
architectureWhich monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?
Extras
indybest
News
Anna Nicole Smith died of an accidental overdose in 2007
people
Life and Style
food + drink
Arts and Entertainment
'The Great British Bake Off' showcases food at its most sumptuous
tvReview: Bread-making skills of the Bake Off hopefuls put to the test
Property
A cupboard on sale for £7,500 in London
lifeAnother baffling example of the capital’s housing crisis
News
news
News
i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape
eBay's enduring appeal: Online auction site is still the UK's most popular e-commerce retailer

eBay's enduring appeal

The online auction site is still the UK's most popular e-commerce site
Culture Minister Ed Vaizey: ‘lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird’

'Lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird'

Culture Minister Ed Vaizey calls for immediate action to address the problem
Artist Olafur Eliasson's latest large-scale works are inspired by the paintings of JMW Turner

Magic circles: Artist Olafur Eliasson

Eliasson's works will go alongside a new exhibition of JMW Turner at Tate Britain. He tells Jay Merrick why the paintings of his hero are ripe for reinvention
Josephine Dickinson: 'A cochlear implant helped me to discover a new world of sound'

Josephine Dickinson: 'How I discovered a new world of sound'

After going deaf as a child, musician and poet Josephine Dickinson made do with a hearing aid for five decades. Then she had a cochlear implant - and everything changed
Greggs Google fail: Was the bakery's response to its logo mishap a stroke of marketing genius?

Greggs gives lesson in crisis management

After a mishap with their logo, high street staple Greggs went viral this week. But, as Simon Usborne discovers, their social media response was anything but half baked
Matthew McConaughey has been singing the praises of bumbags (shame he doesn't know how to wear one)

Matthew McConaughey sings the praises of bumbags

Shame he doesn't know how to wear one. Harriet Walker explains the dos and don'ts of fanny packs
7 best quadcopters and drones

Flying fun: 7 best quadcopters and drones

From state of the art devices with stabilised cameras to mini gadgets that can soar around the home, we take some flying objects for a spin
Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

The midfielder returned to the Premier League after two years last weekend. The controversial character had much to discuss after his first game back
Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

British No 1 knows his consistency as well as his fitness needs working on as he prepares for the US Open after a ‘very, very up and down’ year
Ferguson: In the heartlands of America, a descent into madness

A descent into madness in America's heartlands

David Usborne arrived in Ferguson, Missouri to be greeted by a scene more redolent of Gaza and Afghanistan
BBC’s filming of raid at Sir Cliff’s home ‘may be result of corruption’

BBC faces corruption allegation over its Sir Cliff police raid coverage

Reporter’s relationship with police under scrutiny as DG is summoned by MPs to explain extensive live broadcast of swoop on singer’s home