Life and Style

Burgundy is on a roll, bordeaux a roller-coaster. In 2013, bordeaux failed to deliver a good enough vintage to make it worth buying early.

Wine: Something for the weekend

Couch potato

Anthony Rose: Will 2012 be a good year for wine?

Imagine it's a year from now. The turbulent events of 2012 seem so obvious with the benefit of a rear-view mirror. True, we'd already seen wine sales starting to spiral downwards, but isolation from Europe coupled with yet another above-inflation tax hike brought gloom if not quite doom to what was left of the high street. The new Oddbins and Wine Racks clung on. George Osborne riffled greedily through our pocket but failed to spot the gaping hole in it.

Oil, gold and fine wine outstrip the FTSE

Oil, gold and fine wine outstripped the FTSE in 2011, the index of the 100 most valuable companies having fallen 5.6 per cent over the year.

Anthony Rose: 'The speed at which China is learning about wine has taken the global wine industry by surprise'

One of the keys to the dramatic expansion of wine in China was the result of Hong Kong's new-found status as a global wine hub. On 27 February 2008, John Tsang, the Chief Financial Secretary of Hong Kong's Treasury, announced the scrapping of the tax on wine in Hong Kong. With an estimated 350 importers today, and the proliferation of air-conditioned warehouses, Hong Kong has become a major supplier of fine wine, both legally and illicitly (China's duty is 48 per cent to Hong Kong's zero) to China.

Anthony Rose: 'Whoever satisfies the growing thirst for Chinese wine in a price- and status-conscious market, wins'

Eyebrows were raised heavenwards this autumn when the trophy for a Bordeaux blend over £10 was snatched by a Chinese red from beneath the noses of Argentina, Australia and California. Sneering journalists questioned the integrity of the Decanter World Wine Awards. Then they queried the authenticity of the wine itself. How could China possibly make a wine capable of taking on and beating the world? D Loh commented in the China Daily: "If the wine is good, connoisseurs query if it has been secretly imported and then placed in a Chinese bottle."

Business Diary: A different way to see the City

Sharp-suited bankers wondering about groups of unusual-looking tourists in Docklands may have come across a new tour being organised by the Occupy London protesters. It offers an historical guide to financial sites in the capital. The tone for the tour is rather set by the promotional blurb: "Canary Wharf is situated in the London borough of Tower Hamlets, the local authority with the second highest rate of severe child poverty in the UK. This year, Barclays Bank announced pay and bonuses for its top five staff of £110m".

Anthony Rose: 'One classified Bordeaux château now sells two-thirds of all its produce to China'

Bordeaux, Burgundy, Beaujolais. My first editor assumed, and so therefore did I, that this was the holy trinity of Bs at whose altar the Indy wine reader would sip and worship. And so it was until the New World cocked a snook at the French, using the same grapes but undercutting them on price. It worked as a boot up the derrière and while the three French Bs are now required to take their place alongside cabernet sauvignon and pinot noir (less so gamay) from the unlikeliest nooks and crannies, remembrance of things past has rekindled a new love-in with today's Bordeaux.

Anthony Rose: 'Fine wines have now become status symbols in Asia'

After the calm comes the storm in a wine glass. Between the tasting of the new 2010 Bordeaux vintage before Easter and a second showing of the wines at Vinexpo a couple of weeks back, three things happened. The majority of critics came out with their scores and tasting notes. Bordeaux responded by setting prices for the wines. And the wine trade is now offering those wines for sale en primeur (ie, before bottling and delivery in 2013) to consumers.

Anthony Rose: 'The American critic Robert Parker called Weinert Malbec South America’s only outstanding wine'

Occasionally, a wine has an impact that takes it into the realm of legend. The 1977 Cavas de Weinert Malbec is such a wine. Three years after Juan Domingo Péron's death, the volume of cheap wine drunk in Argentina rivalled that of France and the notion of quality was as alien a concept as political stability. Made from old malbec vines, in large new oak barrels, this wine was impressively powerful. It was the creation of Raúl de la Mota, then in the twilight of an illustrious career. Born in 1918, de la Mota was strongly influenced by Bordeaux's eminent Professor Émile Peynaud after the latter's visit to Argentina for the French wine company Calvet. In the 1980s, the American critic Robert Parker called Weinert South America's only outstanding wine.

Fine wine goes well with a balanced portfolio – but it's getting scarce

As the best vintages outperform every asset but gold, Julian Knight goes to Bordeaux to get a taste of the business

Anthony Rose: 'En primeur is a funny old game, but when it works, both consumers and the wine trade benefit'

Late for Lafite. I swing into the gravel driveway of the Pauillac first-growth château at half past noon. The place is a morgue. All week, elbow room in Bordeaux is at a premium thanks to the thousands of trade and press visitors thronging from around the globe to taste the new vintage. Lafite, though, along with the global travelling circus, is out to lunch.

Errors & Omissions: History is not quite repeating itself in the deserts of North Africa

On Wednesday, Patrick Cockburn wrote about Libya: "Forays to and fro by a few pick-ups with machine-guns in the back are reported as if they were German and British divisions fighting in the same area 70 years ago."

Anthony Rose: An anonymous, unsung hero – until now

Although he's been described in news reports as "famous", not many people actually seem to know very much about Philippe Bascoules. Yet the man now in the hot seat at Francis Ford Coppola's Napa Valley Estate, re-named Inglenook, has been second in command as estate director at Château Margaux since 1990.

Fine wine trading prices continue to beat FTSE

Traded fine wine prices rose 3.7 per cent in February, according to the Bordeaux Index, continuing the asset's strong start to 2011.

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