Arts and Entertainment

If there was a "miaow!" button on my keyboard, I'd have worn it out on Sky Living's new modelling talent show. With Naomi Campbell on the judging panel, it could never be less than diva-licious, but The Face set itself apart from America's Next Top Model and even the superb RuPaul's Drag Race with an extra 20 per cent added bitchy. You see, it wasn't just the contestants in competition last night, it was the judges too.

First encounters / When Charlie Chaplin met Jean Cocteau

Charlie Chaplin's first encounter with Jean Cocteau was memorable not so much for its improbability (it took place on a Japanese boat in the South China Sea) or its spirit (friendly enough) as for the marked disinclination the meeting inspired in either man for any second encounter.

OBITUARY: Lita Grey

The "genius" of Charlie Chaplin is as elusive today as it was assured throughout his long career. Even those most confident of his stature have difficulty with his love life. His very fame was a factor in his undoing. He was 29 when in 1918 he married the 16-year-old Mildred Harris - who neglected to tell him that Louis B. Mayer had already signed her to contract with billing as Mrs Charles Chaplin. Lita Grey was his second wife and the marriage ended equally messily. It also established him in the public eye as a man who preferred young girls.

Theatre Review by Robert Hanks

the makropulos secret / the white scourge Chelsea Centre, London

When Johnnie came marching home

When Daddy Came Home Barry Turner & Tony Rennell Hutchinson £16.99

Metro Choice: Who's that swimming with Pierre Gruneberg?

Pierre Gruneberg (far right), resident swimming instructor at the Grand Hotel in Cap Ferrat, is demonstrating his technique and giving lessons at the Savoy hotel next week (1-4 November; tel 071-836 4343). Over the last 40 years, those who have benefitted from 'La Methode Gruneberg' (first, he puts your head in a glass salad bowl full of water) have included Aristotle Onassis (below), Charlie Chaplin and Pablo Picasso. But be warned: swimming in this illustrious company costs pounds 40 for one 40-minute lesson, pounds 100 for three.

Obituary: Martha Raye

Margaret Theresa Yvonne Reed (Martha Raye), actress, singer, comedienne: born Butte, Montana 27 August 1916; married seven times; died Los Angeles 19 October 1994.

Silence is golden

Victoria Chaplin, daughter of the legendary silent screen star Charlie Chaplin, is treading the boards in London again with the acclaimed Le Cirque Invisible, a show which combines magic, acrobatics and illusion.

IN THE FRAME / Joseph Cornell: Theatre of the Mind

When the American artist Joseph Cornell died in 1973, at the age of 70, he was already renowned for his surreal and enigmatic boxes, which one critic called 'some of the most individual achievements in the entire modernist canon'. In an introductory essay to Theatre of the Mind: Selected Diaries, Letters and Files (Thames & Hudson pounds 24), Robert Motherwell lists Cornell's obsessions reflected in his boxes' contents: 'Birds and cages, empty cages, mirrors, ballerinas and theater folk (living and dead), foreign cities, Americana, Tom Thumb, Greta Garbo, Mallarme, Charlie Chaplin, neglected children, charts of the stars, wineglasses, pipes, corks, thimbles, indigo blue and milky white, silver tinsel, rubbed wood, wooden drawers filled with treasures, knobs, cheese boxes (as a joke), wooden balls, hoops, rings, corridors, prison bars, infinite alleys . . .'. (If the cheese boxes are a joke, what is the rest?)

Happy Anniversary: Desperate Dan and Charlie Chaplin make their debuts

SEVEN notable days in the coming week, with the anniversaries that other diaries fail to reach.

Birth of a rumour is laid to rest

LOS ANGELES - One of the hottest topics of gossip and speculation ever to swirl through Hollywood and Beverly Hills may finally have been put to rest after the publication of a three- paragraph death notice in a newspaper, writes Phil Reeves.

Door closes on memory game

NATASHA DIOT, 16, was annoyed at herself for forgetting the door. If she had remembered to go through that door, she would have found the four playing cards she left in the room behind it. Then she could have remembered the whole pack, but even that would not have stopped Dominic O'Brien from retaining his title as World Memory Champion at Simpson's restaurant in the Strand in London yesterday.

Charlie Chaplin lookalike contest

(Photograph omitted)

TELEVISION / Briefing: Famous for 50 minutes

If David Frost has hosted 25 shows with his name in the title, Clive James must be fast catching him up. In his latest offering, CLIVE JAMES - FAME IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY (9.30pm BBC1), his name even precedes the actual subject. With the aid of copious clips, he examines the influence of the media on celebrity since the turn of the century. Theodore Roosevelt was one of the first to realise the power of moving pictures; he starred in a Presidential campaign film that culminated in his chopping down a tree that landed on the cameraman. Charlie Chaplin became the most famous figure on earth, and Rudolph Valentino the most desirable. His fame also proved his undoing, however; an illness became fatal when his advisers failed to find a doctor celebrated enough to treat him. As Beatrice Ballard's comprehensive first episode (of eight) shows, once the fame genie is out of the bottle, it is very hard to put back.

FILM / A very Dickie Chaplin

IF THERE is anything you don't understand about Chaplin, just make sure you stay until the final credits. As each performer is named, his or her character is explained one last time, just in case you missed the point: 'Mildred Harris was his first wife . . . ' This look-and-learn tone rings throughout the film, which is made from chunky flashbacks. The ageing Charlie - at least I take the buttering of his head with speckled rubber to indicate old age - sits in Switzerland and chats to his editor (Anthony Hopkins). Ostensibly they are picking over the fine points of Chaplin's autobiography, but their true purpose is to light our path through the narrative. As each stage of Chaplin's life comes up for inspection, the editor greets it with admiring blurb: 'My God, Charlie, you were the most famous man in the world, and you weren't even 30]' Sometimes information is simply dumped in our laps. When he first mentions J Edgar Hoover, Charlie is told: 'I think you should make it clear that this was before he became head of the FBI . . .'

FILM / The lovey and the tramp

Richard Attenborough's cinema of hero-worship came into its own with a subject, Gandhi, who was a major shaper of events, then went on to treat a man (Steve Biko in Cry Freedom) who suffered rather than achieved - whose suffering, indeed, was his achievement, when he became a human rallying cry for his people. Now, with Chaplin (12), Attenborough turns his attention to an artist who found his way into public life only by accident, and didn't really know what to do with the power he was given.
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