Voices
Even now, political leaders are advocating wholly orthodox approaches to managing deficits and currency volatility

Top-scoring universities to bail out rivals

England's best-performing universities will be "taxed" next year, in order to bail out their less successful neighbours, higher education funding chiefs revealed yesterday.

Profit-linked pay `fails to motivate'

Share ownership schemes and profit-related pay operated by the UK's top 100 companies often fail to deliver benefits in terms of greater employee participation and understanding of their firms' aims, according to a new report, writes Nic Cicutti.

Letter: It's there in black and white: the right to act solely in our interest over EMU is long gone

Hamish McRae talks a lot of sense but there is one thing he consistently gets wrong. In "The immoral deficits that tax our future" (Business, 17 November) he writes that a 3 per cent deficit "is not low enough to maintain deficits [I presume he meant debts] as a percentage of GDP, for hardly any European economies can consistently grow at 3 per cent". This is meant to be an argument against the Maastricht criterion.

Obituary: John Hillaby

Pedestrian was the last word to apply to John Hillaby, though he has been called the most celebrated pedestrian in England. Yet like his contemporaries, Clive Wainwright and Wilfred Thesiger, he was admired as much by armchair idlers as by the serious walking fraternity. Whether pacing rapidly through the streets of London or across the high moors of his beloved Yorkshire, his tall, spare figure was instantly recognisable, and even in his seventies he could leave younger men struggling in his wake.

US scientists link abortion to breast cancer

A single abortion can significantly increase the chances of a woman developing breast cancer, according to scientists in the United States, who claim that there has been a deliberate attempt to conceal the risk for more than 40 years.

This idea is a fat lot of good

Franchising: the format that has made Fatty Arbuckles fit for expansion will seek new converts at its national exhibition this week

The language minders

Andrew Baker looks at the Mr Fixit role of the foreign footballer's interpreter

The road to benefits is full of potholes

Graduation means time to face reality - financial demands that may come as a surprise to those unprepared for life outside university. Welcome to the joys of council tax, income tax and national insurance, and kiss goodbye to free prescriptions and dental treatment. In addition, as soon as you start to earn anything worthwhile, student loans will need to be paid back.

Why left sounds right to a babe in arms

Scientists have a new explanation for the age-old question of why mothers instinctively cradle their babies on the left.

New issues generate millionaire boffins

A computer software company with only 25 staff was valued on the stock market at pounds 30m yesterday after its shares rose to a 60 per cent premium on their first day of dealings.

Letter: Overreaction to the Internet

Sir: In his comment on the trial of the murderers of Daniel Handley, David Aaronovitch suggests several steps that could be taken to protect our children (17 May). Among them is: "Clean up the Internet".

The Human Condition: The quitter's guide to fitness

Most people want to get fit. Very few make it. If you want to stay the course, help is at hand. Eleanor Bailey offers a step-by-step plan

Letter: Labour plans

Hamish McRae ("Markets think Labour may revert to type", Business, 5 May) makes some interesting points about Labour and the budget deficit, but his comparision between Labour's plans to keep the national debt at a constant proportion of GDP and the experience of the 1970s (when Labour ran a budget deficit of 6.9 per cent) is too simplistic.

City talk: History suggests that Camellia has a future

Camellia (20p) is something of an oddity, but one that could well repay investors' patience. Unsung, certainly, but there are a core of followers for the tea plantations to fine art company. A big attraction, as one fan puts it, is that it is stuffed to the gunnels with hidden assets. Some of these are quite extraordinary, such as its collection of historical manuscripts, possibly worth millions. Items in the collection, range from Impressionist letters to original papers by Einstein, and love letters between Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Robert Browning. The shares have suffered in the past few days on poor figures from its associate company, Linton Parks. But with its hidden riches, the downside is limited. Although the company sees the manuscript collection as a long-term investment, it could well reward shareholders prepared to take a similar view. That, and the fact that it seems a well-managed business, suggests the shares merit a buy.

City Technology detects windfall

Two academics who bought their technology business from London's City University three years ago, are set for a multi-million-pound windfall when the company comes to the stock market in June.
News
Mickey Rourke celebrates his victory against opponent Elliot Seymour
people
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Gordon and Tana Ramsay arrive at the High Court, London
newsTV chef gives evidence against his father-in-law in court case
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Actor Burt Reynolds last year
people
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Johnny Handle, Northumberland, Ted Relph, President of Lakeland Dialect Society, and Sid Calderbank, Lancashire, founder of the National Dialect Day
newsMeet the enthusiasts determined to stop them dying out
News
The data shows that the number of “unlawfully” large infant classes has doubled in the last 12 months alone
i100Mike Stuchbery, a teacher in Great Yarmouth, said he received abuse
Arts and Entertainment
The starship in Star Wars: The Force Awakens
filmsThe first glimpse of JJ Abrams' new film has been released online
Sport
Rio Ferdinand returns for QPR
sportRio Ferdinand returns from his three-game suspension today
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The Speaker of the House will takes his turn as guest editor of the Today programme
arts + ents
Career Services

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Independent Travel
Burgundy
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Lake Garda
Lake Como
Bruges
Paris
Prices correct as of 28 November 2014
Homeless Veterans Christmas Appeal: ‘We give them hope. They come to us when no one else can help’

Christmas Appeal

Meet the charity giving homeless veterans hope – and who they turn to when no one else can help
Should doctors and patients learn to plan humane, happier endings rather than trying to prolong life?

Is it always right to try to prolong life?

Most of us would prefer to die in our own beds, with our families beside us. But, as a GP, Margaret McCartney sees too many end their days in a medicalised battle
Thomas Cook's outgoing boss Harriet Green got by on four hours sleep a night - is that what it takes for women to get to the top?

What does it take for women to get to the top?

Thomas Cook's outgoing boss Harriet Green got by on four hours sleep a night and told women they had to do more if they wanted to get on
Christmas jumper craze: Inside the UK factory behind this year's multicultural must-have

Knitting pretty: British Christmas Jumpers

Simmy Richman visits Jack Masters, the company behind this year's multicultural must-have
French chefs have launched a campaign to end violence in kitchens - should British restaurants follow suit?

French chefs campaign against bullying

A group of top chefs signed a manifesto against violence in kitchens following the sacking of a chef at a Paris restaurant for scalding his kitchen assistant with a white-hot spoon
Radio 4 to broadcast 10-hour War and Peace on New Year's Day as Controller warns of cuts

Just what you need on a New Year hangover...

Radio 4 to broadcast 10-hour adaptation of War and Peace on first day of 2015
Cuba set to stage its first US musical in 50 years

Cuba to stage first US musical in 50 years

Claire Allfree finds out if the new production of Rent will hit the right note in Havana
Christmas 2014: 10 best educational toys

Learn and play: 10 best educational toys

Of course you want them to have fun, but even better if they can learn at the same time
Paul Scholes column: I like Brendan Rodgers as a manager but Liverpool seem to be going backwards not forwards this season

Paul Scholes column

I like Brendan Rodgers as a manager but Liverpool seem to be going backwards not forwards this season
Lewis Moody column: Stuart Lancaster has made all the right calls – now England must deliver

Lewis Moody: Lancaster has made all the right calls – now England must deliver

So what must the red-rose do differently? They have to take the points on offer 
Cameron, Miliband and Clegg join forces for Homeless Veterans campaign

Cameron, Miliband and Clegg join forces for Homeless Veterans campaign

It's in all our interests to look after servicemen and women who fall on hard times, say party leaders
Millionaire Sol Campbell wades into wealthy backlash against Labour's mansion tax

Sol Campbell cries foul at Labour's mansion tax

The former England defender joins Myleene Klass, Griff Rhys Jones and Melvyn Bragg in criticising proposals
Nicolas Sarkozy returns: The ex-President is preparing to fight for the leadership of France's main opposition party – but will he win big enough?

Sarkozy returns

The ex-President is preparing to fight for the leadership of France's main opposition party – but will he win big enough?
Is the criticism of Ed Miliband a coded form of anti-Semitism?

Is the criticism of Miliband anti-Semitic?

Attacks on the Labour leader have coalesced around a sense that he is different, weird, a man apart. But is the criticism more sinister?
Ouija boards are the must-have gift this Christmas, fuelled by a schlock horror film

Ouija boards are the must-have festive gift

Simon Usborne explores the appeal - and mysteries - of a century-old parlour game