Voices
Even now, political leaders are advocating wholly orthodox approaches to managing deficits and currency volatility

Private schools take on the public providers

Is it best to go to an institution that's part of a university or a stand-alone one?

Log on to a brave new world of education

What is better: e-learning or books? Peter Brown looks at the varied ways of absorbing information

Secrets of the story hunters: Are investigative journalists so high-minded?

The world's most famous investigative reporter is a brave but fallible hack with a record in exposing economic corruption, whose string of lovers includes a girl with a dragon tattoo. Unfortunately for journalism, Mikael Blomkvist is a figment of the imagination of novelist Stieg Larsson, creator of the bestselling Millennium trilogy.

Out of mind, out of sight: The blind man who can 'see' obstacles

Experiments on a blind man who can ‘see’ to avoid obstacles could have huge implications for the visually impaired

Father time: Why George Daniels is the world’s best horologist

George Daniels was never officially born: a suitably mythic start for the man now known as the world's greatest watchmaker. But the 84-year-old's opinions are real enough: he denies his daughter exists, thinks people who buy vintage Rolexes are fools, and God forbid you ask him to make a piece if he doesn't like you...

Has Rupert Murdoch's paywall gamble paid off?

Advertisers don't like it. Analysts are unconvinced. The paywall at News International may not be winning many fans, but the man behind it is determined to keep it standing.

Are the Telegraph's political scoops good journalism – or just a case of friends in high places?

When Andy Coulson, the Tory communications chief, entered Downing Street in the full knowledge that the coalition Government would have to embark on a programme of savage public-sector job cuts he was no doubt equally aware that some civil servants might do all they could to make his job a nightmare.

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown: 7/7: the aftermath of tragedy

Five years ago, bombers struck at the heart of British society. But what that terrible day revealed was the depth of our tolerance

Rosie Waterhouse: Will the voice of moderate Muslims be heard at City?

I wrote an opinion piece in this space three months ago, headlined "Universities must take action on Muslim extremism". Naively, I did not anticipate the furore that followed. I was moved to write because of my anxieties about the increasingly confrontational activities of the student Islamic Society at City University London where I teach. They had staged events with the "brothers" and "sisters" segregated, invited radical Islamist speakers and planned to show a DVD of the Yemen-based preacher Anwar al-Awlaki, who has been banned from Britain for his alleged links to terrorists. The DVD was not shown after the then vice-chancellor, Malcolm Gillies, intervened.

Enhance your employability

A starter qualification, the MBM has gained a strong presence in the market

Britain's got talent: This year’s graduate collections

We're riding high in the international style stakes, and this year's graduate collections show why our home-grown designers are wowing the rest of the world. Harriet Walker checks out the class of 2010

Travelling habits of high-flying professionals: Why graduates with MBAs are the most likely to work abroad

As he tees off at an exclusive Hong Kong golf course, Avijit Choudhury has come a long way since he quit his job in relationship management for a financial trading software company in London.

Will Rupert Murdoch's plans to charge for access to his websites pay off?

Next week Rupert Murdoch introduces a charge for access to the websites of his best-known news titles. Will his latest gamble pay off?

Speech and language therapy: Help children, dementia sufferers and many others to communicate their needs better

By the end of today, John Bercow, the former Speaker of the House of Commons and MP for Buckingham, may find himself unemployed. Traditionally, the Speaker's seat is uncontested but Bercow, a controversial figure for many MPs, is facing a range of opponents in today's general election. Before he became Speaker in June 2009, few outside Westminster knew of Bercow; few, that is, other than the UK's 11,500 practising speech and language therapists (SLTs). Indeed, should Bercow find himself on the wrong side of the count tonight, he can take comfort from the fact that, in this small and female-dominated segment of the health service, the Bercow Review lives on.

Gillian Duffy: Rochdale Granny

Gillian Duffy was upset after Gordon Brown called her a bigot for raising the issue of immigration. She won’t be voting Labour this time – but she is unconvinced by David Cameron. In more ways than one, it is the story of the election so far. Whitehall Editor Brian Brady investigates
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape
eBay's enduring appeal: Online auction site is still the UK's most popular e-commerce retailer

eBay's enduring appeal

The online auction site is still the UK's most popular e-commerce site
Culture Minister Ed Vaizey: ‘lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird’

'Lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird'

Culture Minister Ed Vaizey calls for immediate action to address the problem
Artist Olafur Eliasson's latest large-scale works are inspired by the paintings of JMW Turner

Magic circles: Artist Olafur Eliasson

Eliasson's works will go alongside a new exhibition of JMW Turner at Tate Britain. He tells Jay Merrick why the paintings of his hero are ripe for reinvention
Josephine Dickinson: 'A cochlear implant helped me to discover a new world of sound'

Josephine Dickinson: 'How I discovered a new world of sound'

After going deaf as a child, musician and poet Josephine Dickinson made do with a hearing aid for five decades. Then she had a cochlear implant - and everything changed
Greggs Google fail: Was the bakery's response to its logo mishap a stroke of marketing genius?

Greggs gives lesson in crisis management

After a mishap with their logo, high street staple Greggs went viral this week. But, as Simon Usborne discovers, their social media response was anything but half baked
Matthew McConaughey has been singing the praises of bumbags (shame he doesn't know how to wear one)

Matthew McConaughey sings the praises of bumbags

Shame he doesn't know how to wear one. Harriet Walker explains the dos and don'ts of fanny packs
7 best quadcopters and drones

Flying fun: 7 best quadcopters and drones

From state of the art devices with stabilised cameras to mini gadgets that can soar around the home, we take some flying objects for a spin
Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

The midfielder returned to the Premier League after two years last weekend. The controversial character had much to discuss after his first game back
Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

British No 1 knows his consistency as well as his fitness needs working on as he prepares for the US Open after a ‘very, very up and down’ year
Ferguson: In the heartlands of America, a descent into madness

A descent into madness in America's heartlands

David Usborne arrived in Ferguson, Missouri to be greeted by a scene more redolent of Gaza and Afghanistan
BBC’s filming of raid at Sir Cliff’s home ‘may be result of corruption’

BBC faces corruption allegation over its Sir Cliff police raid coverage

Reporter’s relationship with police under scrutiny as DG is summoned by MPs to explain extensive live broadcast of swoop on singer’s home