Voices
Even now, political leaders are advocating wholly orthodox approaches to managing deficits and currency volatility

Log on to a brave new world of education

What is better: e-learning or books? Peter Brown looks at the varied ways of absorbing information

Private schools take on the public providers

Is it best to go to an institution that's part of a university or a stand-alone one?

Secrets of the story hunters: Are investigative journalists so high-minded?

The world's most famous investigative reporter is a brave but fallible hack with a record in exposing economic corruption, whose string of lovers includes a girl with a dragon tattoo. Unfortunately for journalism, Mikael Blomkvist is a figment of the imagination of novelist Stieg Larsson, creator of the bestselling Millennium trilogy.

Out of mind, out of sight: The blind man who can 'see' obstacles

Experiments on a blind man who can ‘see’ to avoid obstacles could have huge implications for the visually impaired

Father time: Why George Daniels is the world’s best horologist

George Daniels was never officially born: a suitably mythic start for the man now known as the world's greatest watchmaker. But the 84-year-old's opinions are real enough: he denies his daughter exists, thinks people who buy vintage Rolexes are fools, and God forbid you ask him to make a piece if he doesn't like you...

Has Rupert Murdoch's paywall gamble paid off?

Advertisers don't like it. Analysts are unconvinced. The paywall at News International may not be winning many fans, but the man behind it is determined to keep it standing.

Are the Telegraph's political scoops good journalism – or just a case of friends in high places?

When Andy Coulson, the Tory communications chief, entered Downing Street in the full knowledge that the coalition Government would have to embark on a programme of savage public-sector job cuts he was no doubt equally aware that some civil servants might do all they could to make his job a nightmare.

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown: 7/7: the aftermath of tragedy

Five years ago, bombers struck at the heart of British society. But what that terrible day revealed was the depth of our tolerance

Rosie Waterhouse: Will the voice of moderate Muslims be heard at City?

I wrote an opinion piece in this space three months ago, headlined "Universities must take action on Muslim extremism". Naively, I did not anticipate the furore that followed. I was moved to write because of my anxieties about the increasingly confrontational activities of the student Islamic Society at City University London where I teach. They had staged events with the "brothers" and "sisters" segregated, invited radical Islamist speakers and planned to show a DVD of the Yemen-based preacher Anwar al-Awlaki, who has been banned from Britain for his alleged links to terrorists. The DVD was not shown after the then vice-chancellor, Malcolm Gillies, intervened.

Enhance your employability

A starter qualification, the MBM has gained a strong presence in the market

Britain's got talent: This year’s graduate collections

We're riding high in the international style stakes, and this year's graduate collections show why our home-grown designers are wowing the rest of the world. Harriet Walker checks out the class of 2010

Travelling habits of high-flying professionals: Why graduates with MBAs are the most likely to work abroad

As he tees off at an exclusive Hong Kong golf course, Avijit Choudhury has come a long way since he quit his job in relationship management for a financial trading software company in London.

Will Rupert Murdoch's plans to charge for access to his websites pay off?

Next week Rupert Murdoch introduces a charge for access to the websites of his best-known news titles. Will his latest gamble pay off?

Speech and language therapy: Help children, dementia sufferers and many others to communicate their needs better

By the end of today, John Bercow, the former Speaker of the House of Commons and MP for Buckingham, may find himself unemployed. Traditionally, the Speaker's seat is uncontested but Bercow, a controversial figure for many MPs, is facing a range of opponents in today's general election. Before he became Speaker in June 2009, few outside Westminster knew of Bercow; few, that is, other than the UK's 11,500 practising speech and language therapists (SLTs). Indeed, should Bercow find himself on the wrong side of the count tonight, he can take comfort from the fact that, in this small and female-dominated segment of the health service, the Bercow Review lives on.

Gillian Duffy: Rochdale Granny

Gillian Duffy was upset after Gordon Brown called her a bigot for raising the issue of immigration. She won’t be voting Labour this time – but she is unconvinced by David Cameron. In more ways than one, it is the story of the election so far. Whitehall Editor Brian Brady investigates
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The long walk west: they fled war in Syria, only to get held up in Hungary – now hundreds of refugees have set off on foot for Austria

They fled war in Syria...

...only to get stuck and sidetracked in Hungary
From The Prisoner to Mad Men, elaborate title sequences are one of the keys to a great TV series

Title sequences: From The Prisoner to Mad Men

Elaborate title sequences are one of the keys to a great TV series. But why does the art form have such a chequered history?
Giorgio Armani Beauty's fabric-inspired foundations: Get back to basics this autumn

Giorgio Armani Beauty's foundations

Sumptuous fabrics meet luscious cosmetics for this elegant look
From stowaways to Operation Stack: Life in a transcontinental lorry cab

Life from the inside of a trucker's cab

From stowaways to Operation Stack, it's a challenging time to be a trucker heading to and from the Continent
Kelis interview: The songwriter and sauce-maker on cooking for Pharrell and crying over potatoes

Kelis interview

The singer and sauce-maker on cooking for Pharrell
Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Charlie Austin: Queens Park Rangers striker says ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

Charlie Austin: ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

After hitting 18 goals in the Premier League last season, the QPR striker was the great non-deal of transfer deadline day. But he says he'd preferred another shot at promotion
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea