The BBC Proms at the Royal Albert Hall

Prom 35: Williams, Osborne, BBC Phil, Storgards; Prom 36: Bevan, Spence, Callow, Hallé, Elder

Steven Osborne is one of the unsung heroes of British pianism. This 40-year-old Scot tends to be typecast as a Beethoven and Schubert man, but he can create subtle spells with Ravel and Debussy: how would he handle Grieg’s ‘Piano Concerto in A minor’?

Album: Gustavo Dudamel, Discoveries (Deutsche Grammophon)

This compilation of highlights drawn predominantly from Gustavo Dudamel's stewardship of the Simón Bolivar's Symphony Orchestra opts for high-octane passages such as the opening movement of Beethoven's 5th and the "Danse Sacrale" from Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring, with pieces from Arturo Márquez and Silvestre Revueltas – notably the latter's fiery "Noche de Jaranas" from La Noche de Los Mayas – establishing the orchestra's Latin American origins.

Bryn Fest, Royal Festival Hall, London

There could be no Bryn Fest (Terfel, that is) without show tunes. But the spectacle of the great Welsh bass-baritone arriving on stage sporting a wrap-around "Madonna" mic is not one I care to repeat in a hurry. He wasn’t alone, of course, but such ugly, obtrusive, devices had no place in The Golden Age of Broadway where the great and the good somehow managed without them - and even in the age of radio head-mics adequate amplification can generally be managed with a high degree of invisibility. This wasn’t the O2 Arena, it was the Royal Festival Hall. So why?

Joyce DiDonato/David Zobel, Wigmore Hall, London

Joyce DiDonato is not just a singer, she's a cheerleader carrying the torch for opera whenever she gets the chance.

Guy/Bavouzet/Armstrong/Chamayou, Wigmore Hall, London

‘In a park, at twilight, a tennis ball has got lost; a young man and two girls come looking for it. They start to play hide and seek, chase each other, quarrel and sulk...’

Album: Gustavo Dudamel, The Simon Bolivar Orchestra: Beethoven 3 "Eroica"; Overtures (Deutsche Grammophon)

The Simon Bolivar Orchestra may have dropped the "youth" from their name, but as Gustavo Dudamel claims, "the young soul remains".

Rapt audience: Bernard Haitink tutors Gad Kadosh

Bernard Haitink: A maestro passes on his baton to the next generation

It's tough to make it as a conductor – so when 20 young stars were asked to perform for the great Bernard Haitink, the pressure was on.  reports

Everybody's Talking About: Billy Budd, ENO, London

Today's hot ticket

Moved by the tragedy behind Berlioz's Troy story

David McVicar tells Louise Flind about the huge challenge of staging Les Troyens

Lars Vogt, Queen Elizabeth Hall, London / Janine Jansen Residency, Wigmore Hall, London (4/5, 5/5)

It’s a welcome new trend that pianists should begin their recitals with a Haydn sonata. Still regarded in some quarters as the humble forerunner to Mozart, Haydn not only created the sonata form, but carried out experiments in it which still sound daring today.

Album: Beethoven et al, Diabelli Variations – Andreas Staier (Harmonia Mundi)

In 1819, Anton Diabelli invited 50 composers to contribute a variation to a composite volume that was to be a snapshot of Viennese musical life.

Thomas Adès conducts Barbara Hannigan and Hilary Summers

The Importance of Being Earnest, Barbican Hall, London
Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Barbican Hall, London
OperaShots, Linbury Studio, Royal Opera House, London

Fast, funny and furious, Gerald Barry's adaptation of 'a trivial comedy for serious people' merits a full staging

Album: Inon Barnatan, Darknesse (Visible Avie)

On Darknesse Visible, the Israeli pianist Inon Barnatan offers a compelling programme of pieces inspired by poems, their interpretations occupying the netherworld between light and dark.

Mitsuko Uchida, Royal Festival Hall

Schubert’s last three sonatas, like Beethoven’s final three, make a massive valedictory statement, but in a very different way.

International Conductors’ Academy of the Allianz Cultural Foundation, Royal Festival Hall

A showcase for three young conductors, a malfunction at the printers, and for the first time in my experience no programmes for the audience and the prospect of blind-tasting their talents.

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