Danes want an 'open Europe'

COPENHAGEN - Denmark took over the rotating leadership of the European Community yesterday, outlining its goals for the six-month presidency under the headline 'The Open Europe'.

Howden settles Great Belt dispute

HOWDEN Group, the Glasgow- based engineer, has settled the long-running dispute over the Danish Great Belt tunnelling contract, writes Heather Connon.

RECORDS / Double Play: Brian's large forces and Rued's awakening: Stephen Johnson and Edward Seckerson battle over an Englishman, a Dane, and five symphonies

Brian: Symphony No 4, 'Das Siegeslied'. Symphony No 12 - Czecho-Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra and Choruses / Adrian Leaper (Marco Polo 8.223447)

Leading Article: Sticking to a principle

THE SHADOW Cabinet meets tomorrow to decide how Labour MPs should vote at the end of next week's paving debate reintroducing the Maastricht treaty Bill to the Commons for its third reading. Yesterday the party's foreign affairs spokesman, Dr Jack Cunningham, suggested that Labour should vote against the Government. He drew a distinction between the motion, a primarily technical measure, and the party's position on the treaty, which it supports with the proviso that Britain's opt-out on the social chapter and monetary union should be renounced. Dr Cunningham also reiterated Labour's view that the Bill should not go back to the Commons while the position of the Danes, who rejected the treaty in a referendum last summer, remains unclear.

Telephone companies resent EC price attack

BRUSSELS - Europe's monopoly telephone companies criticised a European Commission attack on the prices they charge for international calls, writes Tim Jackson.

Danes shift

Copenhagen (AFP) - A slim majority of Danes - 55 per cent - would support European union in a new referendum if Denmark were given special status, according to an opinion poll published on Saturday in the conservative Jyllands-Posten daily.

Danish MPs demand new treaty

COPENHAGEN (AFP) - A majority of the Danish parliament said yesterday that the Maastricht treaty would have to be renegotiated and re-ratified by other countries to include important changes sought by Denmark.

Letter: Democratic decisions

Sir: Could someone please explain why the democracies of Denmark, Eire and France merit a referendum while that of Britain does not. Does this Government not trust the electorate to make the 'right' decision, or is their decision considered to be irrelevant?

PROMS / Notices : Danish National Radio SO / Kitaenko - Royal Albert Hall / Radio 3

Day or night, sun or moon, a fair, faithful bride or the dark, enticing Elf-King's daughter? What a choice for poor Lord Oluf. How could any warm-blooded 19th-century composer fail to sympathise? For their Friday Prom, Dmitri Kitaenko and the Danish National Radio Symphony Orchestra brought a setting of the story by Niels Gade, widely labelled as the father of Danish classical music, but rarely heard outside his own land. The Elf-King's Daughter has its sweet, gently colourful moments (and soprano Inge Nielsen certainly helped warm them to life) but the lack of pace becomes increasingly problematic as the grisly denouement approaches. One can't help wishing that the Mendelssohn of Die erste Walpurgisnacht had been around to offer a little advice.

Blow for Danes

COPENHAGEN (Reuter) - The Danish Agriculture Minister, Laurits Toernaes, expressed concern yesterday that beef exports could be hurt following the diagnosis of Denmark's first case of 'mad cow' disease - bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE).

Olympics 1992 Wednesday 5 August: New Age: Rob Denmark - 5000 metres: Round 1 8.55pm

'They don't give us a chance,' says Rob Denmark of the critics bemoaning a drop in British endurance running standards. Denmark has a chance to prove the detractors wrong in Barcelona, as one of a British trio that has produced world-ranking times this season. 'It has brought me on to another level,' says Denmark of the new domestic rivalry.

Letter: Shrewd Danes still hold back European tide

YOUR leader 'Canute was a Good Thing' (28 June) suggests that the story of King Canute and the waves was 'Norman propaganda'. In fact, it has been stood on its head during this century, with the result that almost everyone who has heard of Canute thinks him foolish rather than wise. What the ancient tale actually told was that his courtiers tried to flatter him that so great a king could even hold back the rising of the tide. He took them with him to the shore precisely in order to expose their absurdity.
Latest stories from i100
SPONSORED FEATURES
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Giants Club: After wholesale butchery of Idi Amin's regime, Uganda’s giants flourish once again

Uganda's giants are flourishing once again

After the wholesale butchery of Idi Amin's regime, elephant populations are finally recovering
The London: After 350 years, the riddle of Britain's exploding fleet is finally solved

After 350 years, the riddle of Britain's exploding fleet is finally solved

Archaeologists will recover a crucial item from the wreck of the London which could help shed more light on what happened in the vessel's final seconds
Airbus has patented a jet that could fly from London to New York in one hour

Airbus has patented a jet that could fly from London to New York in one hour

The invention involves turbojets and ramjets - a type of jet engine - and a rocket motor
10 best sun creams for kids

10 best sun creams for kids

Protect delicate and sensitive skin with products specially formulated for little ones
Tate Sensorium: New exhibition at Tate Britain invites art lovers to taste, smell and hear art

Tate Sensorium

New exhibition at Tate Britain invites art lovers to taste, smell and hear art
Ashes 2015: Nice guy Steven Finn is making up for lost time – and quickly

Nice guy Finn is making up for lost time – and quickly

He was man-of-the-match in the third Test following his recall to the England side
Ashes 2015: Remember Ashton Agar? The No 11 that nearly toppled England

Remember Ashton Agar?

The No 11 that nearly toppled England
Turkey-Kurdish conflict: Obama's deal with Ankara is a betrayal of Syrian Kurds and may not even weaken Isis

US betrayal of old ally brings limited reward

Since the accord, the Turks have only waged war on Kurds while no US bomber has used Incirlik airbase, says Patrick Cockburn
VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but doubts linger over security

'A gift from Egypt to the rest of the world'

VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but is it really needed?
Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, applauds a man who clearly has more important things on his mind
The male menopause and intimations of mortality

Aches, pains and an inkling of mortality

So the male menopause is real, they say, but what would the Victorians, 'old' at 30, think of that, asks DJ Taylor
Man Booker Prize 2015: Anna Smaill - How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?

'How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?'

Man Booker Prize nominee Anna Smaill on the rise of Kiwi lit
Bettany Hughes interview: The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems

Bettany Hughes interview

The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems
Art of the state: Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China

Art of the state

Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China
Mildreds and Vanilla Black have given vegetarian food a makeover in new cookbooks

Vegetarian food gets a makeover

Long-time vegetarian Holly Williams tries to recreate some of the inventive recipes in Mildreds and Vanilla Black's new cookbooks