Fiona Shaw

Margaret Olley: Celebrated Australian painter and patron of the arts

Margaret Olley had just put the final touches to more than two dozen works about to be exhibited in Sydney when she died in her sleep, "with paint still on her fingers", according to her dealer and friend, Philip Bacon. Olley was one of Australia's best loved and respected artists, a prolific painter of still lifes and domestic interiors, mostly created inside her cluttered Sydney home. She was also a leading patron of the arts, mentoring young artists and donating millions of dollars to public galleries to help them acquire works.

British actresses sexy? They're just too inhibited, says film producer

British starlets such as Keira Knightley and Emma Watson have risen to the high ranks of Hollywood thanks in part to their beauty, but a leading producer has claimed that when it comes to sex actresses from this side of the Channel are too inhibited compared with the French. Producers sought a smouldering actress to play Dominic Cooper's love interest in The Devil's Double, the recently released film about Saddam Hussein's savage son, Uday.

Bafta-winning actress Anna Massey dies

Anna Massey, the veteran actress whose pursed face of disapproval was often employed in the role of repressed maiden aunt, has died at the age of 73.

Kutcher to replace Sheen in Two and a Half Men

One of the most lucrative franchises in American television once more revolves around Two and a Half Men, after Ashton Kutcher was hired to replace Charlie Sheen in the sitcom he was fired from in spectacular fashion almost three months ago.

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The Tempest (PG)

Like Alonso and Gonzalo under Ariel's soporific spell, you may experience "a strange drowsiness" during Julie Taymor's film interpretation of Shakespeare's late play. What kept me awake was Helen Mirren's imperial performance as Prospera (above), gender-flipped from Prospero in the film's boldest coup, and her touching relationship with her daughter Miranda, also beautifully played by Felicity Jones. The switch from masculine to feminine lends the story a deeper sense of reconciliation and forgiveness, though as a spectacle Taymor's film exhausts rather than exhilarates, failing to establish any sense of scale or control. It roars and rages, like a tempest, but aside from Mirren its thunder is mostly fake.