Arts and Entertainment Rebecca Hall, left, and Morgan Spector in a scene from 'Machinal'

American Airlines Theatre, New York

Stephen Wall: Critic and academic who edited the leading literary journal 'Essays in Criticism' for 37 years

For 37 years Stephen Wall served as the editor of Essays in Criticism, regarded as a leading journal in the field of English studies.

Rhiannon Harries: What I learnt from Sir Trevor Nunn's A-level test

Waiting for exam results is, I recall, a time of intermittent anxiety. There are occasional palpitations, but my memory is of a merciful period of enforced stasis – no more work could be done to change my destiny; it was now in the lap of the gods. But unlike those teens who received their grades on Thursday, I didn't endure daily debate and gloomy pronouncements about the qualification I was hoping to achieve.

Andreas Voustinas: Actor and teacher who worked with Mel Brooks and Jane Fonda

Andreas Voutsinas appeared in three films by Mel Brooks and coached many actors including Jane Fonda and Warren Beatty.

Warum Warum, Bouffes du Nord, Paris

Peter Brook's latest production completed a short run at his Parisian home-base behind the Gare du Nord on Sunday before resuming its touring life in Budapest this week, and then on to Germany, Armenia and Italy.

Alice Jones: Much to see in a bumper theatre week

The big news this week is Sam Mendes’ double bill of The Tempest and As You Like It at the Old Vic.

The Arts Diary: Eye of the storm

Francis Alÿs, the Belgian-born artist who lives in Mexico, and whose oeuvre has just become the subject of a Tate Modern exhibition, told me he spent 10 years running into tornados that swirl around the outskirts of Mexico City to create a new film work, unveiled at the London gallery, but stopped after realising it was just getting too dangerous. "I spent about three weeks every year in the tornado season doing it but a lot of the material was too damaged to be used. I blew six cameras over that time because of the extremely thin dust particles that got into them." When asked what kind of body armour he worked in to protect himself from the violent conditions, he answered: "Um, a scarf around my neck."

Jubilant Catherine Zeta Jones thanks Michael Douglas after Tony awards triumph

Catherine Zeta Jones thanked her film star husband - who she gets to "sleep with every night" - when she picked up a gong at the Tony Awards.

Tara Fitzgerald: 'Plenty of good roles for older actresses'

The English actress, Tara Fitzgerald, has spoken out against the popular belief that female performers are faced with fewer work opportunities than males as they get older.

Keira Knightley 'stalker' trial halted

The trial of a man accused of harassing actress Keira Knightley was discontinued today.

Diary: Luvvie and hate

That fine actor David Suchet has complained to The Stage newspaper that the use of the word "luvvie" to describe him and his fellow air-kissing thesps is "the worst thing that ever happened to our profession". Frankly, I thought swingeing cuts to the arts budget, or perhaps Michael Bay, might be considered more damaging to the actor's cause than a word that Wikipedia categorises as an "affectionate term" (and which I presumed had fallen out of usage in about 1976). But Suchet, currently appearing in Arthur Miller's All My Sons in the West End, is adamant: "The role of an actor in America, eastern Europe and western Europe – everywhere apart from this country – is considered a very serious job and a very necessary function. Here we are just luvvies, which is a great shame." Martin Brown, assistant general secretary of the actors union Equity, told our reporter that a number of notable performers have come to him in the past, terribly concerned by the prevalence of the term. Haven't they better things to do? Their make-up, maybe?

Two actors and their epic search to find the secrets of Shakespeare

Understanding the Bard can be hard, as stars of the stage and screen confess in a new film

Peter Cheeseman: Pioneer of theatre-in-the-round whose reality-based approach to drama influenced his protégé Mike Leigh

"Make it stick," the Arts Council's drama director Jo Hodgkinson told Peter Cheeseman when he decided to back a fledgling theatre company in a seedy converted club in Stoke-on-Trent almost 50 years ago. Making it stick was Cheeseman's forte: he saw out years when his unheated theatre was so cold that even if an audience came you couldn't hear them clap because they were wearing gloves; and saw off an extraordinary attempt by his own patron, Stephen Joseph, to replace him.

James Aubrey: Actor who began his career as Ralph in Peter Brook's Lord of the Flies

The actor James Aubrey was just 14 when he played Ralph, elected "chief" of the group of boys stranded on a remote island after a plane crash, in Peter Brook's powerful 1963 screen version of Lord of the Flies. The director's search for his lead child actor ended when he spotted Aubrey in a swimming pool in a British Army camp in Jamaica, just four days before filming began.

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