GQ Magazine

Postcard from... Venice Beach

Until recently, Venice Beach was known as a scruffy, bohemian spot: inhabited by creatives, hippies and the homeless and disproportionately afflicted by crime and gang violence.

Robin Thicke's number one single 'Blurred Lines' accused of

It might currently be topping the UK singles charts, but R&B artist Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines” has been criticised by a UK rape charity and online commentators for trivialising sexual violence, objectifying women and "reinforcing rape myths".

Whatever you do, mind the Gap

An exciting series of designer collaborations looks set to put the high-street giant back on the menswear map, says Lee Holmes

More headlines

Trend it like Beckham: eight-year-old Romeo is hailed as a fashion

To most eight-year-old boys, the idea of a sartorial dilemma is whether or not to change tops after a Heinz spaghetti spillage. Spare a thought, therefore, for Romeo Beckham, who must now get up every morning knowing that he has to live up to his billing as one of Britain's best-dressed "men".

James Franco - A life in constant motion

Star of 127 Hours and Howl, host of the 2011 Oscars, PhD student, author, curator... James Franco's workload is immense. How does the actor do it? James Mottram finds out

Why are men's magazines being left on the shelf?

What do men want? It's an imponderable question which I feel strangely unqualified to answer. I suspect there are quite a few men who feel like me: I have an aversion to shopping, contempt for most advertising, only a vague notion of where I'm going in life, a bemused attitude to extreme sports, and a fairly strong conviction that repeatedly showing me images of semi-naked women will do nothing but make me feel depressed, frustrated and grubby. So when I leaf through a pile of men's magazines, I can't help wondering who they're addressing.