News

A £16bn tide of overseas money flooded into the London commercial property market last year, fuelling the best year for the capital since the height of the boom in 2007, according to estate agents Jones Lang LaSalle (JLL).

Whitbread plans hotels for County Hall

Tourists coming to London will soon be able to stay at County Hall, the former home of the defunct Greater London Council, for as little as pounds 10 a night.

pounds 10-a-night hotel plan for County Hall

Tourists coming to London will soon be able to stay at County Hall, the former home of the defunct Greater London Council, for as little as pounds 10 a night.

Slough warns of slow rental growth

TOM STEVENSON

US Embassy facing pounds 3m bill for staff's unpaid tax

There's trouble in the air at the United States Embassy in Grosvenor Square, London. The problem lies not in some arcane policy quarrel with the State Department back home, but much closer to hand: with Britain's Inland Revenue in pursuit of back taxes owed by the Embassy's 300 British employees.

Long, hot summer on the docks

It is was not just what the judgment said, it was also the way that it said it. Lord Justice Simon Brown and Mr Justice Popplewell, sitting in the Queen's Bench Divisional Court, yesterday delivered their verdict on those ports and authorities that had stopped their facilities being used for live animal exports. The terms in which the judgment is couched make it one of the most political in recent legal history.

ARCHITECTURE / An English drama: The look of central London is threatened by a new law. Peter York explains

EATON SQUARE SW1, the spiritual centre of the Grosvenor Estate, where a short lease on a two-bedroom flat can cost pounds 1.25m, is nice to film in. It's what people describe as 'very English' - a euphemism for posh - and is actually rather film-settish. Uniform cream stucco facades, black doors and ironwork, lots of service extras quietly busying around - chauffeurs, Filipino helps, plumbers who look as if they've done apprenticeships. It all creates an impression of unnatural, un-English order, as if - you can't help thinking - the place was privately policed.

Dear Dame Vera: A woman in her early twenties pays tribute to the wartime forces' sweetheart who is still a heroine today

I thought you were dead. Before last week I only knew you as an obscure reference in a Pink Floyd song and an optimist waiting for another encounter, some sunny day. But suddenly you are all over the media and, if you don't mind me saying, looking remarkably good for your age.

High Court frees jailed right-wing author

DAVID IRVING, the extreme right-wing author and apologist for Hitler, was released on appeal by the High Court in London yesterday after serving 10 days of a three- month sentence for contempt.

Angry protest in London

SIX policemen were injured outside the US Embassy in Grosvenor Square yesterday when a protest against a US raid on supporters of General Mohammed Farah Aideed in Mogadishu turned violent. Nine of the group - made up mostly of Somalis living in London - were detained for questioning, writes Rhys Williams.

Music: When Hope fought Death: As Radio 3 launches its month-long 1968 season, Bayan Northcott attempts to recapture the tone of the time

WAS it really all so vital, so hopeful, so different from any other year? The English middle- class students copying their Paris comrades in college and art school protests against 'repressive tolerance' through the summer and autumn of 1968 would have liked to think so. But there was an air of instant mythologising that seemed unconvincing even at the time.

Woman laps up the success of her business venture

Patsy Bloom, head of Pet Plan, a pet insurance firm, with dogs in Grosvenor Square, London, yesterday after being named Businesswoman of the Year. She founded Pet Plan with a pounds 250 loan in 1977 after finding no one to insure her dog. It now has a turnover of pounds 20m.

What price idealism, as middle age spreads?

TWENTY-FIVE years ago yesterday, thousands of demonstrators marched on London's Grosvenor Square to protest against the war in Vietnam. It was the iconic event of the British Sixties for the generation that was going to change the world. Power to the People] It was instant ideology you could pin on your sleeve, but better than no myth at all; everyone who was anyone came, including a student from Arkansas called Bill Clinton. As the North Vietnamese flags were unfurled against a blue March sky, kids in beads and beards eyeballed cops on horses and, without a hint of irony, everybody shouted 'Ho Ho Ho Chi Minh]'.

Diary: 15-21 February

Wednesday 17: Football International, England v San Marino, Wembley Stadium, London NW10.

February diary

1: Launch of 'Doughnut Week 1993' in aid of Save the Children Fund.
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Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 20 February 2015
Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

Climate change key in Syrian conflict

And it will trigger more war in future
How I outwitted the Gestapo

How I outwitted the Gestapo

My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
The nation's favourite animal revealed

The nation's favourite animal revealed

Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
Is this the way to get young people to vote?

Getting young people to vote

From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn