News

A £16bn tide of overseas money flooded into the London commercial property market last year, fuelling the best year for the capital since the height of the boom in 2007, according to estate agents Jones Lang LaSalle (JLL).

pounds 10-a-night hotel plan for County Hall

Tourists coming to London will soon be able to stay at County Hall, the former home of the defunct Greater London Council, for as little as pounds 10 a night.

Whitbread plans hotels for County Hall

Tourists coming to London will soon be able to stay at County Hall, the former home of the defunct Greater London Council, for as little as pounds 10 a night.

Slough warns of slow rental growth

TOM STEVENSON

US Embassy facing pounds 3m bill for staff's unpaid tax

There's trouble in the air at the United States Embassy in Grosvenor Square, London. The problem lies not in some arcane policy quarrel with the State Department back home, but much closer to hand: with Britain's Inland Revenue in pursuit of back taxes owed by the Embassy's 300 British employees.

Long, hot summer on the docks

It is was not just what the judgment said, it was also the way that it said it. Lord Justice Simon Brown and Mr Justice Popplewell, sitting in the Queen's Bench Divisional Court, yesterday delivered their verdict on those ports and authorities that had stopped their facilities being used for live animal exports. The terms in which the judgment is couched make it one of the most political in recent legal history.

ARCHITECTURE / An English drama: The look of central London is threatened by a new law. Peter York explains

EATON SQUARE SW1, the spiritual centre of the Grosvenor Estate, where a short lease on a two-bedroom flat can cost pounds 1.25m, is nice to film in. It's what people describe as 'very English' - a euphemism for posh - and is actually rather film-settish. Uniform cream stucco facades, black doors and ironwork, lots of service extras quietly busying around - chauffeurs, Filipino helps, plumbers who look as if they've done apprenticeships. It all creates an impression of unnatural, un-English order, as if - you can't help thinking - the place was privately policed.

Dear Dame Vera: A woman in her early twenties pays tribute to the wartime forces' sweetheart who is still a heroine today

I thought you were dead. Before last week I only knew you as an obscure reference in a Pink Floyd song and an optimist waiting for another encounter, some sunny day. But suddenly you are all over the media and, if you don't mind me saying, looking remarkably good for your age.

High Court frees jailed right-wing author

DAVID IRVING, the extreme right-wing author and apologist for Hitler, was released on appeal by the High Court in London yesterday after serving 10 days of a three- month sentence for contempt.

Angry protest in London

SIX policemen were injured outside the US Embassy in Grosvenor Square yesterday when a protest against a US raid on supporters of General Mohammed Farah Aideed in Mogadishu turned violent. Nine of the group - made up mostly of Somalis living in London - were detained for questioning, writes Rhys Williams.

Music: When Hope fought Death: As Radio 3 launches its month-long 1968 season, Bayan Northcott attempts to recapture the tone of the time

WAS it really all so vital, so hopeful, so different from any other year? The English middle- class students copying their Paris comrades in college and art school protests against 'repressive tolerance' through the summer and autumn of 1968 would have liked to think so. But there was an air of instant mythologising that seemed unconvincing even at the time.

Woman laps up the success of her business venture

Patsy Bloom, head of Pet Plan, a pet insurance firm, with dogs in Grosvenor Square, London, yesterday after being named Businesswoman of the Year. She founded Pet Plan with a pounds 250 loan in 1977 after finding no one to insure her dog. It now has a turnover of pounds 20m.

What price idealism, as middle age spreads?

TWENTY-FIVE years ago yesterday, thousands of demonstrators marched on London's Grosvenor Square to protest against the war in Vietnam. It was the iconic event of the British Sixties for the generation that was going to change the world. Power to the People] It was instant ideology you could pin on your sleeve, but better than no myth at all; everyone who was anyone came, including a student from Arkansas called Bill Clinton. As the North Vietnamese flags were unfurled against a blue March sky, kids in beads and beards eyeballed cops on horses and, without a hint of irony, everybody shouted 'Ho Ho Ho Chi Minh]'.

Diary: 15-21 February

Wednesday 17: Football International, England v San Marino, Wembley Stadium, London NW10.

February diary

1: Launch of 'Doughnut Week 1993' in aid of Save the Children Fund.
Life and Style
Steve Shaw shows Kate how to get wet behind the ears and how to align her neck
healthSteven Shaw - the 'Buddha of Breaststroke' - applies Alexander Technique to the watery sport
Arts and Entertainment
The sight of a bucking bronco in the shape of a pink penis was too much for Hollywood actor and gay rights supporter Martin Sheen, prompting him to boycott a scene in the TV series Grace and Frankie
tv
Sport
footballShirt then goes on sale on Gumtree
Voices
Terry Sue-Patt as Benny in the BBC children’s soap ‘Grange Hill’
voicesGrace Dent on Grange Hill and Terry Sue-Patt
Arts and Entertainment
Performers drink tea at the Glastonbury festival in 2010
music
Arts and Entertainment
Twin Peaks stars Joan Chen, Michael Ontkean, Kyle Maclachlan and Piper Laurie
tvName confirmed for third series
Sport
Cameron Jerome
footballCanaries beat Boro to gain promotion to the Premier League
Arts and Entertainment
art
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine