Arts and Entertainment Hair time: Colin Wilson breaks another literary rule: don't pose for silly pictures

For ambitious would-be authors, the life of Colin Wilson presents itself as a cautionary tale. Here, Terence Blacker explains where the self-proclaimed genius went wrong

The daughter of modern socialism

Eleanor Marx was fearless in her pursuit of bohemian ideals, but ultimately constrained by her traditional roles as daughter and lover.

Just suppose I looked like Leonardo DiCaprio . . .

on the pros and cons of lookism

Don't be fooled: the New Gay may not even exist yet

HI. Lovely to see you. Fine. You? What have I been doing? I've been leafing through The Gay Kama Sutra and laughing like a drain. Who wouldn't? It's not just the positions, although I wouldn't advise trying them at home and certainly not on Hampstead Heath. Or the photos of implacably groomed hunks jogging along the beach at dawn gazing adoringly into one another's capped teeth. Or the fact that the index is probably the first to list Frottage, Hepatitis B and the Gnostic Texts. It's...

Dog to die

A TERMINALLY-ILL dog seems destined to die in a police kennel after a magistrate refused to let it spend its final days with its owner.

Football: Why earache is Semitic soccer's biggest headache

FAN'S EYE VIEW NO 240 BAR KOCHBA FC

Property: Our friends in the north

Finsbury Park's still a bit iffy, but `Stokie' is definitely `u & c' and there's always Muswell Hill if you have the dosh, writes William Raynor

Buy: A winter's tale

PREVIEW

TRIED & TESTED: SEATS OF YEARNING

Lumpy ant-hills and sodden grass aren't really the ideal picnic seats. Our panellists unfold a few alternatives

Applause for a full house

VISUAL ARTS New Loans at Kenwood Kenwood House, London

The trick is to survive

Fame first knocked on Bernard Kops's door 40 years ago but she's been been a long time coming back. Now, with a new play in London and a Hollywood script under way, it seems that at 70 he has survival down to a fine art.

I have been loyal to absolutely everyone in my time

The Agreeable World of Wallace Arnold

Television: No policies, just sheer bloody politics

Telly star of the week was Larry Hand, mayor of the Sydney suburb of Leichardt and political survivor extraordinaire. Larry was standing for re-election for a fourth mayoral term, and Rats in the Ranks (C4, Tues) was the story of his campaign to woo the six councillors whose votes were necessary to secure his job. It was the most entertaining factual TV I've seen this year.

Letter: Saving lives on the gay scene

Sir: John Lyttle writes: "Rubberstuffers still haunt Hampstead Heath handing out condoms" (article, 30 May); in fact Rubberstuffers have never given out a single condom on the Heath. What Rubberstuffers provides is appropriate condoms in places where gay men are most likely to access them, namely gay venues.

This week: Grade I houses

The best of the market...

The way some sections of the gay press carry on, you'd think a fundamental civil liberty was under threat

You know gay summer has officially begun when Hampstead Heath is raided again. This summer, every summer ... The weather turns nice and the wildlife, you should pardon the expression, comes out. Hampstead locals taking their progeny for a little sun and air find both heels and buggy wheels sticking to discarded condoms and empty tubs of Crisco - those traditional, tell-tale signs that you have fairies at the bottom of your communal garden. Night and day, but especially night, there's the cackle of mating calls, beating-off around the bushes and a constant stream of furtive trade riding through the glen, occasionally stopping, the little Tinkerbells - so residents claim - to light a fire and verbally abuse those vicious homophobes who have the nerve to object. "I say, would you chaps mind awfully ..." when they turn a corner of woodland to find the Bum Boy Three going at it like the clappers against a mighty oak.
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