Arts and Entertainment Hair time: Colin Wilson breaks another literary rule: don't pose for silly pictures

For ambitious would-be authors, the life of Colin Wilson presents itself as a cautionary tale. Here, Terence Blacker explains where the self-proclaimed genius went wrong

THE PATIENT ENGLISH

John Banville's finely-tuned prose is famous for its precision, but has he pulled off the feat of ventriloquising a gay British spy? Ruth Padel meets the Irish novelist, while Elspeth Barker reviews his latest (right)

Watch the birdie: a guided twitch in London

UK OUTDOORS: Hawks in Hackney, raptors in Regent's Park, peregrines in Paddington. If you know where to look, the capital can be a birdwatcher's paradise. Rupert Isaacs on reports

Athletics: Fear and running in South Africa

Mike Rowbottom on a perilous path for two men in the London Marathon

Corporation gets a toe in door of Keats House

People & Business

Rabbits on the roof in Britain's greenest house

Stephen Goodwin on the new home that even recycles its own water

Non-sale of the century

Nicholas Parsons reveals his biggest financial mistake

Obituary: John Hillaby

Pedestrian was the last word to apply to John Hillaby, though he has been called the most celebrated pedestrian in England. Yet like his contemporaries, Clive Wainwright and Wilfred Thesiger, he was admired as much by armchair idlers as by the serious walking fraternity. Whether pacing rapidly through the streets of London or across the high moors of his beloved Yorkshire, his tall, spare figure was instantly recognisable, and even in his seventies he could leave younger men struggling in his wake.

'I feel passionate about our continuing onslaught on the natural world, and the reckless extermination of ever-growing numbers of life forms. And the reason I feel passionate about other creatures is because I feel passionate about humankind.' Jonathon Porritt introduces this special report

The way we relate to other creatures is a very personal thing. Some people couldn't care less, and some seem to care more about animals than they do about human beings, which makes the job of generalising about endangered species a very tricky business I start from an odd position. Just as I don't much like pets (never having recovered from living near Hampstead Heath, with its army of dementedly defecating doggies), nor am I much turned on by the "big brown eye brigade" - the so-called charismatic mega fauna such as tigers, elephants, rhinos. pandas, birds of prey and so on. Give me the humble slime-mould on the forest floor any day! But I still feel passionate about our continuing onslaught on the natural world, and the reckless extermination of ever-growing numbers of life forms. And the reason I feel passionate about other creatures is precisely because I feel passionate about humankind - about our future, our quality of life, our moral and spiritual integrity. When asked the commonplace question, "Why bother about endangered species?", there are a host of possible answers: because other creatures have a basic right in themselves to be treated as equally valuable expressions of evolution as we humans; because our own self-interest may depend on some future use we come to make of these species or the habitats on which they depend; because we have no right to deprive future generations of their enjoyment or use of these creatures. But more important than all of these is the fact that we owe it to ourselves, right here and now, to fulfil our obligation to act as stewards of this heaving and mysterious multitude of life.

Mayo's terrace army to fight on

Mayo squandered a six-point lead to a flurry of late scores from a below-par Meath team, whose 12 points matched the Connaught side's goal (worth three points) and nine points to force a replay in yesterday's All-Ireland Gaelic Football Final.

How music inflames the savage breast

Just off to Africa - pop acrorse and pairtr'nise the blairk mairn, don't you know? - but before I go I thought I'd let you know what I've decided about this business of music.

THEATRE Love in a Wood New End, Hampstead

Paul Taylor uncovers the contemporary echoes in a comic tale of outdoor sex

SUMMER IN THE CITY

Ealing Jazz Festival, Walpole Park, Mattock Lane, W5 (0181-758 5743).

Rhymes of the ancient mariner

music on radio

Would you like to be a househusband?

John Peel, DJ and presenter: As viewed traditionally, I wouldn't. I'm not at all envious of my wife's role as a housewife because she has the unenviable task of looking after me. My wife is the fuel on which I run, in fact yesterday we were having one of those conversations about what would happen if Mummy died and I said that obviously I would have to cope and our 14- year-old daughter said: "Daddy you would go completely to pieces." If anyone had to do a time and motion study on our house they would be appalled.

A man of a different kidney

Seven weeks ago, Clive Sinclair wrote memorably here about illness, health morality, dialysis and the hope of a transplant. Here is his account of that transplant. Photograph by Michael Chambati-Woodhead
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Turkey-Kurdish conflict: Obama's deal with Ankara is a betrayal of Syrian Kurds and may not even weaken Isis

US betrayal of old ally brings limited reward

Since the accord, the Turks have only waged war on Kurds while no US bomber has used Incirlik airbase, says Patrick Cockburn
VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but doubts linger over security

'A gift from Egypt to the rest of the world'

VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but is it really needed?
Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, applauds a man who clearly has more important things on his mind
The male menopause and intimations of mortality

Aches, pains and an inkling of mortality

So the male menopause is real, they say, but what would the Victorians, 'old' at 30, think of that, asks DJ Taylor
Man Booker Prize 2015: Anna Smaill - How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?

'How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?'

Man Booker Prize nominee Anna Smaill on the rise of Kiwi lit
Bettany Hughes interview: The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems

Bettany Hughes interview

The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems
Art of the state: Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China

Art of the state

Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China
Mildreds and Vanilla Black have given vegetarian food a makeover in new cookbooks

Vegetarian food gets a makeover

Long-time vegetarian Holly Williams tries to recreate some of the inventive recipes in Mildreds and Vanilla Black's new cookbooks
The haunting of Shirley Jackson: Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?

The haunting of Shirley Jackson

Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?
Bill Granger recipes: Heading off on holiday? Try out our chef's seaside-inspired dishes...

Bill Granger's seaside-inspired recipes

These dishes are so easy to make, our chef is almost embarrassed to call them recipes
Ashes 2015: Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

A woefully out-of-form Michael Clarke embodies his team's fragile Ashes campaign, says Michael Calvin
Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza

Andrew Grice: Inside Westminster

Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza
HMS Victory: The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

Exclusive: David Keys reveals the research that finally explains why HMS Victory went down with the loss of 1,100 lives
Survivors of the Nagasaki atomic bomb attack: Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism

'I saw people so injured you couldn't tell if they were dead or alive'

Nagasaki survivors on why Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism
Jon Stewart: The voice of Democrats who felt Obama had failed to deliver on his 'Yes We Can' slogan, and the voter he tried hardest to keep onside

The voter Obama tried hardest to keep onside

Outgoing The Daily Show host, Jon Stewart, became the voice of Democrats who felt the President had failed to deliver on his ‘Yes We Can’ slogan. Tim Walker charts the ups and downs of their 10-year relationship on screen