Arts and Entertainment Hair time: Colin Wilson breaks another literary rule: don't pose for silly pictures

For ambitious would-be authors, the life of Colin Wilson presents itself as a cautionary tale. Here, Terence Blacker explains where the self-proclaimed genius went wrong

THE PATIENT ENGLISH

John Banville's finely-tuned prose is famous for its precision, but has he pulled off the feat of ventriloquising a gay British spy? Ruth Padel meets the Irish novelist, while Elspeth Barker reviews his latest (right)

Watch the birdie: a guided twitch in London

UK OUTDOORS: Hawks in Hackney, raptors in Regent's Park, peregrines in Paddington. If you know where to look, the capital can be a birdwatcher's paradise. Rupert Isaacs on reports

Athletics: Fear and running in South Africa

Mike Rowbottom on a perilous path for two men in the London Marathon

Corporation gets a toe in door of Keats House

People & Business

Rabbits on the roof in Britain's greenest house

Stephen Goodwin on the new home that even recycles its own water

Non-sale of the century

Nicholas Parsons reveals his biggest financial mistake

Obituary: John Hillaby

Pedestrian was the last word to apply to John Hillaby, though he has been called the most celebrated pedestrian in England. Yet like his contemporaries, Clive Wainwright and Wilfred Thesiger, he was admired as much by armchair idlers as by the serious walking fraternity. Whether pacing rapidly through the streets of London or across the high moors of his beloved Yorkshire, his tall, spare figure was instantly recognisable, and even in his seventies he could leave younger men struggling in his wake.

'I feel passionate about our continuing onslaught on the natural world, and the reckless extermination of ever-growing numbers of life forms. And the reason I feel passionate about other creatures is because I feel passionate about humankind.' Jonathon Porritt introduces this special report

The way we relate to other creatures is a very personal thing. Some people couldn't care less, and some seem to care more about animals than they do about human beings, which makes the job of generalising about endangered species a very tricky business I start from an odd position. Just as I don't much like pets (never having recovered from living near Hampstead Heath, with its army of dementedly defecating doggies), nor am I much turned on by the "big brown eye brigade" - the so-called charismatic mega fauna such as tigers, elephants, rhinos. pandas, birds of prey and so on. Give me the humble slime-mould on the forest floor any day! But I still feel passionate about our continuing onslaught on the natural world, and the reckless extermination of ever-growing numbers of life forms. And the reason I feel passionate about other creatures is precisely because I feel passionate about humankind - about our future, our quality of life, our moral and spiritual integrity. When asked the commonplace question, "Why bother about endangered species?", there are a host of possible answers: because other creatures have a basic right in themselves to be treated as equally valuable expressions of evolution as we humans; because our own self-interest may depend on some future use we come to make of these species or the habitats on which they depend; because we have no right to deprive future generations of their enjoyment or use of these creatures. But more important than all of these is the fact that we owe it to ourselves, right here and now, to fulfil our obligation to act as stewards of this heaving and mysterious multitude of life.

Mayo's terrace army to fight on

Mayo squandered a six-point lead to a flurry of late scores from a below-par Meath team, whose 12 points matched the Connaught side's goal (worth three points) and nine points to force a replay in yesterday's All-Ireland Gaelic Football Final.

How music inflames the savage breast

Just off to Africa - pop acrorse and pairtr'nise the blairk mairn, don't you know? - but before I go I thought I'd let you know what I've decided about this business of music.

THEATRE Love in a Wood New End, Hampstead

Paul Taylor uncovers the contemporary echoes in a comic tale of outdoor sex

SUMMER IN THE CITY

Ealing Jazz Festival, Walpole Park, Mattock Lane, W5 (0181-758 5743).

Rhymes of the ancient mariner

music on radio

Would you like to be a househusband?

John Peel, DJ and presenter: As viewed traditionally, I wouldn't. I'm not at all envious of my wife's role as a housewife because she has the unenviable task of looking after me. My wife is the fuel on which I run, in fact yesterday we were having one of those conversations about what would happen if Mummy died and I said that obviously I would have to cope and our 14- year-old daughter said: "Daddy you would go completely to pieces." If anyone had to do a time and motion study on our house they would be appalled.

A man of a different kidney

Seven weeks ago, Clive Sinclair wrote memorably here about illness, health morality, dialysis and the hope of a transplant. Here is his account of that transplant. Photograph by Michael Chambati-Woodhead
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
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Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
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Prices correct as of 30 January 2015
Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee