Arts and Entertainment
 

Jack Whitehall was crowned King of Comedy at the ceremony in London

TELEVISION / Personal services: Of course, things have never been the same since That Was the Week that Was . . . Oh yeah? Jim White says satire is alive and spitting

The comedian Victor Lewis Smith once reduced the production staff at That's Life to a pool of gibbering liquid with a particularly savage telephone gag. Posing as a disabled trombonist, Lewis Smith rang to ask if he might be auditioned for the show. A member of Esther Rantzen's team showed growing excitement as Lewis Smith played the trombone passably. But the mood altered dramatically as he pretended to collapse out of his wheel-chair in a death swoon.

CINEMA / On Cinema

British film comedy is usually thought of as cosy; an old cardigan you can't bear to be parted from, no matter the stains, rips and moth holes. Ealing and all that, you know.

Growing pains: Who needs the hassle of a garden?

For all the hype about how gardening is becoming the fashionable pastime, few people under the age of 40 will admit that they enjoy it. This is perfectly natural. Gardening is tedious, time-consuming and ultimately soul-destroying, especially in London.

Bunhill: Generosity lies in the eye of the receiver

AN upcoming biography of former Private Eye editor and Pressdram chairman Richard Ingrams makes an astonishing claim. According to the book, Lord of the Gnomes, the Eye solicited and received a substantial amount of money from Lord King - he of British Airways. Strange bedfellows, you may think. And you'd be right.

New DJs fail to halt Radio 1 slide: Audience now 3.5 million down on same time last year

THE BBC's controversial decision to axe many of its most famous Radio 1 broadcasters for a young generation of disc jockeys and an assortment of news, comedy and religious programmes, has led to a decline in audience figures.

Bunhill: From our mailbag

WELCOME to the corner reserved especially for you, the reader. And, following my interest in the BBC's political editor, this from John Webb of Tottenham: 'Re: this Robin Oakley chappie. Am I the only person who thinks that he is actually Harry Enfield?' Next, a Mr C D Powell of Southsea contacts me about Graham Greene's four nipples: 'Your comments remind me of the character Scaramanga in the James Bond story, The Man with the Golden Gun, whose extra nipple was supposed to suggest great sexual potency. Does anyone know if Alan Clark is thus endowed and what colour weapon he uses?' Thank you, Mr Powell] And keep those letters coming, everyone]

Dear Harry Enfield: A fond farewell to the comedian's rib-tickle-tabulous DJ characters, Smashie and Nicey. Now maybe it's time to disconnect the ubiquitous Mr Cholmondley-Warner ..

The news has finally percolated out of the offices of Radio Fab FM that Smashie and Nicey have spun their last disc. You have announced to a quite literally gob-smacked nation that you are to kill off this pair of toupee-tastic broadcasting jocks.

Style: Best-distressed man about town: You've got the cast, now find the cast-offs. John Windsor meets the man behind television's wardrobe

Really, Mr Grayson] Your moustache may be immaculately clipped, but I happen to know your dapper three-piece, chalk-stripe suit was bought secondhand in Brick Lane, east London, for a paltry 20 quid. I saw it last week on a rack of costumes reserved for your mentor, Harry Enfield, behind the counter in an industrial unit containing the country's biggest collection of contemporary men's hire costumes.

Half-smile on show for the cameras: Director-General of the BBC re-emerges in public as support for his position strengthens despite continuing controversy over his tax affairs

JOHN BIRT had his back to the wall yesterday as the controversy over his tax arrangements continued. But it was by choice; indeed it was by prior arrangement.

Four-minute opera cracks the record

IT IS the world's shortest opera: from overture to curtain call in the time it takes to boil an egg.

Profile: It's such a laugh being somebody else: Harry Enfield, Mr I-don't-think-I'm-funny-as-myself

Rod Stewart was re-united with the Faces; U2, the world's most popular group, turned up in force; and kd lang, the world's most wonderful singer, belted out a number. There was no disputing, however, who was the star turn at last month's Brit Awards, the rock business's annual junket of self-congratulation. And he wasn't even a pop singer.

TELEVISION / Talking out of his arias: Giles Smith on Harry Enfield's Guide to Opera

Harry Enfield said his interest in opera was awoken like any other ordinary punter's: he caught a few bars in the adverts; he dabbled at home with some arias and highlights on record; he started to experiment with the harder, full-length operas on CD; he began going out to score at concerts. And from there it was just one inevitable slow slide into presenting his own Channel 4 series on the subject. (Ordinary punters may find this last stage of the addiction less easy to get to.) So, here's Harry Enfield's Guide to Opera, dedicated to popularising Puccini and his chums, but more importantly (let's face it) dedicated to popularising Harry Enfield, which, after the brilliant Harry Enfield Television Show, hardly seems necessary.

Newman and Baddiel. What a joke]: Girls scream, students queue, tills ring. But who's really laughing at this pair of comedians, and do they care anyway?

WHO ARE the most successful comedians in Britain this Christmas? Whose current video will be popped into more stockings than those of Harry Enfield, Rowan Atkinson and Bernard Manning combined? Who sold out more shows at the 3,500-seat Hammersmith Odeon on their recent British tour than Bob Dylan managed the last time he was in Britain? And who were described by a well- known comedy figure as 'a right pair of arrogant little smart alecs?'

RADIO / Goodbye to the House of Fun?: The BBC is talking about developing 'services of distinction and quality': could this mean the end of Radio 1 disc jockeys as we know them? Martin Kelner worries

APPROACH Broadcasting House from the south, but instead of entering the prow of that stately liner through the great brass doors, take a sharp right into Langham Street. The first building you come to is Egton House.

'Executive game' helps BBC chiefs learn to compete

FOR THE past two days 50 senior BBC executives, holed up in a hotel near the Dartford tunnel, have spent pounds 1.5bn on two and a half years' worth of television programmes.
Voices
voicesGood for Lana Del Rey for helping kill that myth, writes Grace Dent
News
The University of California study monitored the reaction of 36 dogs
sciencePets' range of emotions revealed
Life and Style
fashion Designs are part of feminist art project by a British student
Arts and Entertainment
The nomination of 'The Wake' by Paul Kingsnorth has caused a stir
books
Arts and Entertainment
The Tour de France peloton rides over a bridge on the Grinton Moor, Yorkshire, earlier this month
film
News
Snoop Dogg pictured at The Hollywood Reporter Nominees' Night in February, 2013
people... says Snoop Dogg
News
i100
Life and Style
food + drinkZebra meat is exotic and lean - but does it taste good?
Arts and Entertainment
Residents of Derby Road in Southampton oppose filming of Channel 4 documentary Immigration Street in their community
tv
Voices
voicesSiobhan Norton on why she eventually changed her mind
Career Services

Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy': A land of the outright bizarre

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic's latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do The Independent’s experts think he’s missed out?
Can Secret Cinema sell 80,000 'Back to the Future' tickets?

The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
Why do we have blood types?

Are you my type?

All of us have one but probably never wondered why. Yet even now, a century after blood types were discovered, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Honesty box hotels: You decide how much you pay

Honesty box hotels

Five hotels in Paris now allow guests to pay only what they think their stay was worth. It seems fraught with financial risk, but the honesty policy has its benefit
Commonwealth Games 2014: Why weight of pressure rests easy on Michael Jamieson’s shoulders

Michael Jamieson: Why weight of pressure rests easy on his shoulders

The Scottish swimmer is ready for ‘the biggest race of my life’ at the Commonwealth Games
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn