Iggy Pop

Rolling Stones celebrate 50 years

Ageing rockers The Rolling Stones celebrated 50 years in the industry by performing to a packed London crowd for the first time since 2007.

48 Hours: Lucerne

With classical music filling the air, this spectacular Swiss city provides the perfect setting for a summer break.

Rick Owens: The prince of dark design

Rick Owens is face to face with a life-size wax sculpture of himself, staring out of shredded wadding and packed in a wooden crate in a corner of his London store. It's an oddly unnerving sight, as the cult Californian designer is first to admit: brown-eyed and eerily close in appearance to the man himself, the look of it is made no less disturbing by the fact that it is severed from the waist down – it has no legs.

Iggy Pop: Rocking the look

There's more to being a punk legend than the music – it takes raw style. Iggy Pop tells Carola Long about going shirtless, body glitter and transparent trousers

Twelfth Night, Tricycle Theatre, London

A third of the way through, the play stops, completely. Viola, disguised as the boy Cesario, has been virtually propositioned by the countess Olivia. "It is too hard a knot for me to untie," she says, and leaves the stage, confused, to sit in the audience.

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Album: Iggy Pop, Preliminaires, (Reset)

Uninitiated TV viewers moved to investigate who that scary wrinkly man is pimping car insurance in the ad breaks will be doubly baffled when they find out that his latest album is a collection of understated French jazz, retro ragtime and neo bossa nova.

Hit & Run: Where’s our Jon Stewart?

Who said satire was dead? In the US, at least, plenty did. Once President Bush left office, they argued, political comedy would be moribund, irrelevant – specifically that scourge of the Bush administration, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.

Ron Asheton: Influential guitarist with Iggy Pop and the Stooges

Along with their fellow Detroit-area residents Alice Cooper and MC5, the Stooges pioneered a style of garage rock which didn't find much of an audience outside Michigan in the late Sixties and early Seventies but fed into the psyche of the next generation of musicians and is still influential today. The New York Dolls and the Ramones, especially, picked up on the two albums the original Stooges line-up of Iggy Pop (vocals), Dave Alexander (bass), Ron Asheton (guitar) and his younger brother Scott (drums) made for Elektra Records in 1969 and 1970 and which also inspired the first wave of British punk-rock groups in 1976.