Arts and Entertainment

The Week in Radio: Williams was quick on his feet, and willing to cover mishaps with self-deprecating humour

Clark's dance 'Heroes' in London

Dancers from the Michael Clark Company make a return visit to London's Barbican after a touring the country with the production come, been and gone.

Iggy Pop: Rocking the look

There's more to being a punk legend than the music – it takes raw style. Iggy Pop tells Carola Long about going shirtless, body glitter and transparent trousers

Twelfth Night, Tricycle Theatre, London

A third of the way through, the play stops, completely. Viola, disguised as the boy Cesario, has been virtually propositioned by the countess Olivia. "It is too hard a knot for me to untie," she says, and leaves the stage, confused, to sit in the audience.

Black Eyed Peas, 02, London<br/>Iggy and the Stooges, Hammersmith Apollo, London

Black Eyed Peas put on a polished show, but their all-consuming desire to push products &ndash; even Fergie's new perfume &ndash; takes off some of the shine

Iggy and the Stooges, Hammersmith Apollo, London

Still crazy after all these years

Extreme dark: In search of the northern lights &ndash; from a tiny Norwegian town that sees nothing but darkness and ice for two months

Being the antithesis of a morning person, getting up before dawn should count as a heroic achievement. Indeed, staring out of my hotel window at the street-lit cityscape, I'm suffused with all the smug tranquillity of the early riser. Only then do I realise it's actually 10.15am: I've overslept by two hours and missed my appointment with Knut, my guide. Such is the slow, surreal process of acclimatising to Tromso in Norway, located 250 miles north of the Arctic Circle, where for two months from late November, the sun never rises.

Business Diary: Iggy Pop's lust for advertising glory

Back by popular demand. Iggy Pop has filmed a new advertisement for Swiftcover, the online car insurer, despite the controversy that the first campaign provoked. Not only did Iggy face accusations of selling out, it also emerged that Swiftcover would not offer insurance to musicians (it subsequently changed tack). Still, the man himself is unrepentant. "Since I was six years old I wanted to be in an advert," he says.

Michael Clark Company, Barbican, London

It's rock'n'roll (and I like it)

Outside the Box: Demise of Barnes proves great teams provide poor managers

John Barnes' sacking at Tranmere not only offers further proof that great players rarely make equally good managers, but even suggests that the very best teams have the highest percentage of unsuccessful ones. Being associated with a side like England's World Cup-winners can earn you a job but hardly guarantees results, as Bobby Charlton, Nobby Stiles and the West Ham trio of Moore, Hurst and Peters all discovered. Only Jack Charlton and to a lesser extent, Alan Ball, ever thrived. Consider, too, Liverpool's team of 1988, who played much sublime football and would have done the Double but for a bad day in the FA Cup final against Wimbledon. As well as Barnes it included other managerial failures in Steve McMahon (Swindon, Blackpool), Nigel Spackman (Sheffield United, Barnsley, Millwall), Jan Molby (Swansea, Kidderminster, Hull), Gary Ablett (Stockport), Bruce Grobbelaar (various African teams) and Steve Staunton (Ireland), now trying again against all the odds at Darlington. Only Steve Nicol (New England Revolution) and John Aldridge (Tranmere) had any degree of success.

Rock Bowie

Kurt Cobain and Johnny Cash have had the video game treatment in Guitar Hero 5 while the Beatles have been immortalised in their own title.

Observations: Dancing under the covers at new Shoreditch club night

The chirps, buzzes, choral harmonies and fuzzy bass-lines of the Los Angeles synth-pop duo the Bird & the Bee's cover of Rihanna's floor-filler "Don't Stop the Music" epitomise the soundtrack at Cover to Cover, a new club night in London's Shoreditch. The idea behind the night, held in the Queen of Hoxton on Curtain Road, is piled on zeal for great cover versions. We're not talking Mike Flowers on "Wonderwall", more Ian Brown murmuring through "Thriller" or "Billy Jean", or the Bronx – a hardcore outfit from Brooklyn – bouncing along to Prince's "I Would Die for You".

Michael Clark Company, Playhouse, Edinburgh

Despite the loud music and light nudity, Clark's company fails to launch

Come, Been and Gone, Playhouse, Edinburgh

A rebel's dance to the 70s sound

The Black Album, National Theatre, London

It lives on the page but it dies on the stage. That, alas, is the story of Hanif Kureishi's second brilliant novel, The Black Album, which in 1995 picked up on the Salman Rushdie fatwah and the rising cultural phenomenon of British Muslim fundamentalism while cracking open the whole issue of what should form the basis of a liberal, multicultural education programme.

First Night: The Black Album, National Theatre, London

Kureishi's brilliant novel is better left unsaid
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape
eBay's enduring appeal: Online auction site is still the UK's most popular e-commerce retailer

eBay's enduring appeal

The online auction site is still the UK's most popular e-commerce site
Culture Minister Ed Vaizey: ‘lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird’

'Lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird'

Culture Minister Ed Vaizey calls for immediate action to address the problem
Artist Olafur Eliasson's latest large-scale works are inspired by the paintings of JMW Turner

Magic circles: Artist Olafur Eliasson

Eliasson's works will go alongside a new exhibition of JMW Turner at Tate Britain. He tells Jay Merrick why the paintings of his hero are ripe for reinvention
Josephine Dickinson: 'A cochlear implant helped me to discover a new world of sound'

Josephine Dickinson: 'How I discovered a new world of sound'

After going deaf as a child, musician and poet Josephine Dickinson made do with a hearing aid for five decades. Then she had a cochlear implant - and everything changed
Greggs Google fail: Was the bakery's response to its logo mishap a stroke of marketing genius?

Greggs gives lesson in crisis management

After a mishap with their logo, high street staple Greggs went viral this week. But, as Simon Usborne discovers, their social media response was anything but half baked
Matthew McConaughey has been singing the praises of bumbags (shame he doesn't know how to wear one)

Matthew McConaughey sings the praises of bumbags

Shame he doesn't know how to wear one. Harriet Walker explains the dos and don'ts of fanny packs
7 best quadcopters and drones

Flying fun: 7 best quadcopters and drones

From state of the art devices with stabilised cameras to mini gadgets that can soar around the home, we take some flying objects for a spin
Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

The midfielder returned to the Premier League after two years last weekend. The controversial character had much to discuss after his first game back
Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

British No 1 knows his consistency as well as his fitness needs working on as he prepares for the US Open after a ‘very, very up and down’ year
Ferguson: In the heartlands of America, a descent into madness

A descent into madness in America's heartlands

David Usborne arrived in Ferguson, Missouri to be greeted by a scene more redolent of Gaza and Afghanistan
BBC’s filming of raid at Sir Cliff’s home ‘may be result of corruption’

BBC faces corruption allegation over its Sir Cliff police raid coverage

Reporter’s relationship with police under scrutiny as DG is summoned by MPs to explain extensive live broadcast of swoop on singer’s home