Life and Style Was the testosterone filled James Bond susceptible to bouts of man flu?

Men with high levels of testosterone have a secret flaw - less effective immune systems, researchers have discovered

David Jack improved the quality of life for millions of people

Sir David Jack: Pioneering chemist who revolutionised the treatment of asthma

The three great names in British drug development for the past half century had the euphonious names of Jack, Black and Vane; and while Sir David Jack was the only one not to win a Nobel Prize this was largely due to chance, as his discoveries were equal to those of Sir James Black and Sir John Vane. Jack's contribution, with his team, was to develop the first inhaled asthma medicine, salbutamol (Ventolin). It relieved the wheezing of asthma almost instantaneously by going straight to the lungs, and only atiny dose was needed as it was not dispersed around the rest of the body. Previously, patients had to take ephedrine or similar compounds, wait up to half an hour for the drug to be absorbed, and put up with several hours of the tremors and palpitations that were the inevitable side-effects.

X+Y = the romance formula?

DNA date-matching: a scientific shortcut to love?

Fritz Bach: Physician whose work enabled the first successful bone-marrow transplant

Fritz Bach worked in genetics, immunology and vascular biology, but was widely regarded as one of the pioneers in transplant research.

Baruj Benacerraf

Baruj Benacerraf, who died on 9 August aged 90, was a Venezuelan immunologist who shared the 1980 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

Multiple sclerosis study identifies genetic causes

MS is one of the most common neurological conditions in young adults but there is a debate about how it is triggered

Stem cell found that may regenerate blood system

Scientists have for the first time isolated single stem cells that give rise to many different types of blood cell, from the white cells of the immune system and the platelets that help to clot blood, to the red cells that carry oxygen around the body.

Medi-tainment: Do TV patients get a bum deal?

'Medi-tainment' shows focusing on embarrassing ailments attract huge ratings. Meg Carter wonders if this is more exploitation than education

Peanut allergy 'more common in well-off boys'

Potentially fatal childhood peanut allergies mainly affect better-off boys, research has shown.

Flu: How to beat the bugs

Swine flu is back with a vengeance. How can we stay virus-free this winter? Jeremy Laurance explains

Lily Allen's illness reveals danger of blood poisoning

Lily Allen’s hospitalisation with septicaemia has focused attention on a little understood but potentially fatal condition which affects thousands of people every year.

Mystery of Aids immunity may be solved

It has remained a medical mystery for nearly 20 years. Scientists now believe they are close to understanding why a tiny proportion of people with HIV can live for many years without succumbing to Aids.

A cure for the common cold may finally be achieved as a result of a remarkable discovery in a Cambridge laboratory

In a dramatic breakthrough that could affect millions of lives, scientists have been able to show for the first time that the body's immune defences can destroy the common cold virus after it has actually invaded the inner sanctum of a human cell, a feat that was believed until now to be impossible.

Hope of cure for rheumatoid arthritis

New research holds out the hope of ending the misery of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for many thousands of sufferers, it was revealed today.

New pain-free way to test for bone marrow donors

Britain's leading leukaemia charity has invented a painless new way to test whether someone is a match for a bone marrow transplant.

Adult drug 'could transform lives of juvenile arthritis sufferers'



Thousands of British children afflicted with a painful and crippling disease could have their lives transformed by a drug currently reserved for adults, research suggests.

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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

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King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
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Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

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Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent