Army destroys its last mines

THE ARMY'S use of anti-personnel landmines has been consigned to history, George Robertson, the Secretary of State for Defence, said yesterday.

Visual Arts: What the camera didn't hear

WILLIAM FURLONG IMPERIAL WAR MUSEUM LONDON

Peace breaks out at War Museum

THE IMPERIAL War Museum in London is casting off its dusty image as a mausoleum of battlefield memories and reinventing itself as a chronicler of popular history.

Historical Notes: The long, slow road to Civvy Street

THE COMMON perception has it that the First World War came to its sensationally dramatic halt on 11 November 1918 and that that was effectually that: end of fighting, end of story. On the contrary, the ceasefire was followed by an unhappy coda which had many in high places wondering whether the Bolshevik plague then sweeping the Continent might overleap the Channel, with as its prime agent the very men who had won the recent astonishing victory.

Architecture: A new twist in fashion

The V&A's new Spiral opens in 2004, and inside things will get even more warped.

Do today's public rituals hinder our understanding of war?

On the 80th anniversary of the Armistice, three very different views on how we should commemorate the victims of war

As I paid tribute to Great Uncle Jack, I thought of something else. That it was memory without pain, at least for most of us

BOWLER hats are a rare sight in London these days, or anywhere else in Britain outside the processions of the Orange Order, but on Thursday morning I saw many of them in the crowd on the lawn next to Westminster Abbey. Bowler hats and furled umbrellas, trim overcoats with velvet collars, pin-stripe suits, regimental ties, gleaming black shoes, shooting sticks: the uniform of the old Guards officer.

Vandals wreak havoc on war memorials

A CHARITY which repairs memorials to Britain's war dead is struggling to cope with the growing desecration of military monuments. While town- centre war memorials, where people will lay their poppy wreaths next Sunday, are mostly well-kept, others are being vandalised, stolen or left to decay, writes Mark Rowe.

Was this our finest half-hour?

THE SUCCESS of Dad's Army is summed up in a line from its first episode when the bumptious Capt Mainwaring says: "The machine-guns could have a clear field of fire from here to Timothy White's, if it wasn't for that woman in the telephone box."

A witness to the worst of times

When Emmanuel Fisher, a British Jew, went to war, he hadn't heard of the Nazis' Final Solution. Then his unit was sent to liberate Belsen

Politics: Chris Moon with replica of landmine

Lethal weapon: Former soldier Chris Moon, who lost his lower right leg and arm in an explosion in Mozambique, holds a replica of a landmine outside the Imperial War

British diplomat in Cambodia hurt by landmine

A BRITISH diplomat in Cambodia was injured yesterday when the helicopter he was travelling in crash-landed on a landmine.

Obituary: Joseph Darracott

JOSEPH DARRACOTT, writer, art historian, editor, and museum man, was a great servant of art. He left behind him, as a monument to his loyalty and devotion, some 50 issues of the quarterly journal Museum News, 20 scholarly monographs, catalogues and the like, and six books.

Brown set to soften middle class attack

...while Sarah's interest rate rises

Kids out

From Wet and Wild at the Science Museum (0171-938 8000), to Something Beastly at Hampton Court Palace (0181-781 9500, left), there's something to satisfy all ages and tastes during this week's half-term. The Imperial War Museum (0171-416 5000), invites young'uns to enter the top secret world of espionage - assume a false identity, grab a fake passport and send classified information by morse code, while the Museum of London goes further back in time for its celebration of Tudor London (0171-600 3699). An altogether more grisly event is at The Old Operating Theatre Museum and Herb Garrett (0171-955 4791), where today at 2.30pm, children can relive the dread of surgery before anaesthetics, when the patient's only relief from the ordeal was the speed of the surgeon's blade. Nasty. Meanwhile, Wimbledon's Polka Theatre (0181-543 4888) rises to the occasion, as ever, with a new version of Aesop's fable, The Hare and the Tortoise.
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