Army destroys its last mines

THE ARMY'S use of anti-personnel landmines has been consigned to history, George Robertson, the Secretary of State for Defence, said yesterday.

Visual Arts: What the camera didn't hear

WILLIAM FURLONG IMPERIAL WAR MUSEUM LONDON

Peace breaks out at War Museum

THE IMPERIAL War Museum in London is casting off its dusty image as a mausoleum of battlefield memories and reinventing itself as a chronicler of popular history.

Historical Notes: The long, slow road to Civvy Street

THE COMMON perception has it that the First World War came to its sensationally dramatic halt on 11 November 1918 and that that was effectually that: end of fighting, end of story. On the contrary, the ceasefire was followed by an unhappy coda which had many in high places wondering whether the Bolshevik plague then sweeping the Continent might overleap the Channel, with as its prime agent the very men who had won the recent astonishing victory.

Architecture: A new twist in fashion

The V&A's new Spiral opens in 2004, and inside things will get even more warped.

Do today's public rituals hinder our understanding of war?

On the 80th anniversary of the Armistice, three very different views on how we should commemorate the victims of war

As I paid tribute to Great Uncle Jack, I thought of something else. That it was memory without pain, at least for most of us

BOWLER hats are a rare sight in London these days, or anywhere else in Britain outside the processions of the Orange Order, but on Thursday morning I saw many of them in the crowd on the lawn next to Westminster Abbey. Bowler hats and furled umbrellas, trim overcoats with velvet collars, pin-stripe suits, regimental ties, gleaming black shoes, shooting sticks: the uniform of the old Guards officer.

Vandals wreak havoc on war memorials

A CHARITY which repairs memorials to Britain's war dead is struggling to cope with the growing desecration of military monuments. While town- centre war memorials, where people will lay their poppy wreaths next Sunday, are mostly well-kept, others are being vandalised, stolen or left to decay, writes Mark Rowe.

Was this our finest half-hour?

THE SUCCESS of Dad's Army is summed up in a line from its first episode when the bumptious Capt Mainwaring says: "The machine-guns could have a clear field of fire from here to Timothy White's, if it wasn't for that woman in the telephone box."

A witness to the worst of times

When Emmanuel Fisher, a British Jew, went to war, he hadn't heard of the Nazis' Final Solution. Then his unit was sent to liberate Belsen

Politics: Chris Moon with replica of landmine

Lethal weapon: Former soldier Chris Moon, who lost his lower right leg and arm in an explosion in Mozambique, holds a replica of a landmine outside the Imperial War

British diplomat in Cambodia hurt by landmine

A BRITISH diplomat in Cambodia was injured yesterday when the helicopter he was travelling in crash-landed on a landmine.

Obituary: Joseph Darracott

JOSEPH DARRACOTT, writer, art historian, editor, and museum man, was a great servant of art. He left behind him, as a monument to his loyalty and devotion, some 50 issues of the quarterly journal Museum News, 20 scholarly monographs, catalogues and the like, and six books.

Brown set to soften middle class attack

...while Sarah's interest rate rises

Kids out

From Wet and Wild at the Science Museum (0171-938 8000), to Something Beastly at Hampton Court Palace (0181-781 9500, left), there's something to satisfy all ages and tastes during this week's half-term. The Imperial War Museum (0171-416 5000), invites young'uns to enter the top secret world of espionage - assume a false identity, grab a fake passport and send classified information by morse code, while the Museum of London goes further back in time for its celebration of Tudor London (0171-600 3699). An altogether more grisly event is at The Old Operating Theatre Museum and Herb Garrett (0171-955 4791), where today at 2.30pm, children can relive the dread of surgery before anaesthetics, when the patient's only relief from the ordeal was the speed of the surgeon's blade. Nasty. Meanwhile, Wimbledon's Polka Theatre (0181-543 4888) rises to the occasion, as ever, with a new version of Aesop's fable, The Hare and the Tortoise.
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Frank Lampard will pass Billy Wright and equal Bobby Charton’s caps tally of 106 caps against
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A scene from Aladdin is performed at the Tony Awards in New York in June
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Usain Bolt of Jamaica smiles and shakes hands with a competitor after Jamaica won their first heat in the men's 4x100m relay
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A small bag of the drug Ecstasy
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Netherlands' goalkeeper Tim Krul fails to make a save from Costa Rica's midfielder Celso Borges during a penalty shoot-out in the quarter-final between Netherlands and Costa Rica during the 2014 FIFA World Cup
newsGoalkeepers suffer from 'gambler’s fallacy' during shoot-outs
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Standing the test of time: Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd in 'Back to the Future'
filmReview: A week late, Secret Cinema arrives as interactive screening goes Back to the Future
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

In grandfather's footsteps

5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

Martha Stewart has flying robot

The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

A tale of two presidents

George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

The dining car makes a comeback

Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

Gallery rage

How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

Eye on the prize

Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Women's rugby: Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup

Women's rugby

Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices