Arts: When fame is in the frame: In a gallery in Hackney, art from the heart of rock. Andy Gill applauds its intentions, and forgives its pretensions

The exhibition 'little pieces from big stars' is the latest fund-raising initiative from War Child, a charity aiming to provide not only food and medicines for the people of Sarajevo and Mostar, but morale-boosting supplies of musical instruments and recordings as well. 'little pieces . . .' brings together close on a hundred artworks by musicians, to be auctioned at the Royal College tomorrow at prices ranging from around pounds 50, for one of several pencil drawings by EMF's Ian Dench, to about pounds 4,000, for a series of 14 computerised collage prints by David Bowie.

Tactical weapons: Abram Games' wartime posters mixed sloganeering with a touch of surrealism and the promise of a brighter future. Iain Gale reports

It was Total War. From 1939 to 1945 the British people were united against tyranny. But the Government, unidealistic, realised that total patriotic unity could not be achieved without some persuasion. An expert in the art of such persuasion was Abram Games.

Diary: Correction

On Tuesday I reported that Kate Adie had referred to her agent a request to be photographed with the veteran reporter John Snagge.

Diary (CORRECTED)

CORRECTION (PUBLISHED 10 JUNE 1994) APPENDED TO THIS ARTICLE

A story told in big bangs: The Woolwich campaign: the aim is victory and a great museum. Christopher Bellamy reports. Photographs by Herbie Knott

The sight of the old Woolwich Arsenal is enough to make strong men weep. Sadly decayed, it sits - a dozen-and-a-half listed buildings - unseen by the public since they were built two centuries ago. At its peak, in the early years of this century, the Arsenal supported 80,000 people. It continued to make prototype weapons until the 1970s, and therefore remained hidden to public view. But when weapons manufacture stopped, nobody was very interested in the site, and the exquisite listed buildings were left to rot.

EXHIBITIONS / Blitz and pieces: To understand the true horror of the Blitz we should ignore hands-on displays and consider the work of Elizabeth Watson, says Iain Gale

In his book The Myth of the Blitz, Angus Calder writes 'We, born since, have ignored how frightening and confusing the period from April 1940 through to June 1941 was for the British people. Perhaps we simply cannot comprehend that fear and confusion imaginatively. Myth stands in our way.' Fifty years on, we are only beginning to de- mythologise the Blitz. The Imperial War Museum's Blitz Experience can recreate a raid over London, but it is still high theatre. We know the Brits will prevail. The fact that in 1940 we very nearly didn't is better conveyed in a modest exhibition of watercolours which opened at the museum last week.

Sponsors asked to invade D-Day

Leading firms have been approached by the Government to sponsor Britain's D-Day commemorations in an attempt to cover the expected pounds 500,000 costs.

Letter: Plan for a Museum of Type

IN THE next two months Britain has its last chance to establish the Type Museum, a unique working museum in London devoted to printing with moveable type. The Merrion Monotype Trust, with the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the Science Museum, has rescued an irreplaceable wealth of letter patterns and precision machines. These - some eight million artefacts - represent Monotype, the hot-metal process patented in 1897 that perfected the art of automatic typesetting and produced typefaces for virtually every known alphabet and script. Printers worldwide came to Monotype for their supplies. The elegance of Monotype type design and technology made possible the unsurpassed quality of 20th- century print.

Wartime entertainers help launch 50th anniversary exhibition of D-Day landings

Fred and Frank Cox, twins who arrived in Normandy shortly after D-Day with the RAF Gang Show, at the Imperial War Museum's D-Day to Victory exhibition, which opens tomorrow. It includes film footage, letters and diaries of those who took part in the landings and secret documents used by Allied leaders.

Major puts D-Day plan into action

JOHN MAJOR launched a million- pound programme yesterday which he hoped would 'unite the nation' - the 50th anniversary of the D-Day landings in June 1944. 'The overwhelming cost will fall on the Government,' he said at the Imperial War Museum in Lambeth, south- east London. 'Not a huge and outrageous sum, but in the low figures of millions. This is a unique event.'

Escapers' Cup

Jane Reid, the widow of Pat Reid who escaped from Colditz during the Second World War, presenting a curling cup to the Imperial War Museum yesterday. The trophy was won by six escapees who beat the Swiss Club in Switzerland in 1942-43.

A United States Air Force F-111 bomber flying over the M11

(Photograph omitted)

Letter: Pictures of war that are over the top

Sir: Further to the letters from Jane Carmichael and Trevor Harvey (20 August) concerning the possibly staged picture of troops going 'over the top' (18 August), your readers may be interested to know that the Department of Printed Books, Imperial War Museum, has recently re-published the autobiography of Lt Geoffrey Malins, How I Filmed the War.

Letter: Poignant truth in a war photograph

Sir: I would like to respond to Fred Parrott's question (letter, 18 August) about the authenticity of the photograph showing troops going over the top which accompanied your feature on court martials of the First World War. The Imperial War Museum holds the 40,000 photographs taken by official photographers during the First World War and it is one of these, catalogued under the reference number Q 5100.

Celebrations mark 50 years of flying by Spitfire that helped win Battle of Britain

Two Pitts Special biplanes and an Extra performing at the Imperial War Museum airfield, Duxford, Cambridgeshire, for celebrations yesterday to mark the 50th anniversary of the Mk IX Spitfire, MH434, which flew 74 missions claiming five German fighters.
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Wilko Johnson, now the bad news: musician splits with manager after police investigate assault claims

Wilko Johnson, now the bad news

Former Dr Feelgood splits with manager after police investigate assault claims
Mark Udall: The Democrat Senator with a fight on his hands ahead of the US midterm elections

Mark Udall: The Democrat Senator with a fight on his hands

The Senator for Colorado is for gay rights, for abortion rights – and in the Republicans’ sights as they threaten to take control of the Senate next month
New discoveries show more contact between far-flung prehistoric humans than had been thought

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Evidence found of contact between Easter Islanders and South America
Cerys Matthews reveals how her uncle taped 150 interviews for a biography of Dylan Thomas

Cerys Matthews on Dylan Thomas

The singer reveals how her uncle taped 150 interviews for a biography of the famous Welsh poet
DIY is not fun and we've finally realised this as a nation

Homebase closures: 'DIY is not fun'

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The Battle of the Five Armies: Air New Zealand releases new Hobbit-inspired in-flight video

Air New Zealand's wizard in-flight video

The airline has released a new Hobbit-inspired clip dubbed "The most epic safety video ever made"
Pumpkin spice is the flavour of the month - but can you stomach the sweetness?

Pumpkin spice is the flavour of the month

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11 best sonic skincare brushes

11 best sonic skincare brushes

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Paul Scholes column: I'm not worried about Manchester United's defence - Chelsea test can be the making of Phil Jones and Marcos Rojo

Paul Scholes column

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Frank Warren: Boxing has its problems but in all my time I've never seen a crooked fight

Frank Warren: Boxing has its problems but in all my time I've never seen a crooked fight

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Jamie Roberts exclusive interview: 'I'm a man of my word – I'll stay in Paris'

Jamie Roberts: 'I'm a man of my word – I'll stay in Paris'

Wales centre says he’s not coming home but is looking to establish himself at Racing Métro
How could three tourists have been battered within an inch of their lives by a burglar in a plush London hotel?

A crime that reveals London's dark heart

How could three tourists have been battered within an inch of their lives by a burglar in a plush London hotel?
Meet 'Porridge' and 'Vampire': Chinese state TV is offering advice for citizens picking a Western moniker

Lost in translation: Western monikers

Chinese state TV is offering advice for citizens picking a Western moniker. Simon Usborne, who met a 'Porridge' and a 'Vampire' while in China, can see the problem
Handy hacks that make life easier: New book reveals how to rid your inbox of spam, protect your passwords and amplify your iPhone

Handy hacks that make life easier

New book reveals how to rid your email inbox of spam, protect your passwords and amplify your iPhone with a loo-roll
KidZania lets children try their hands at being a firefighter, doctor or factory worker for the day

KidZania: It's a small world

The new 'educational entertainment experience' in London's Shepherd's Bush will allow children to try out the jobs that are usually undertaken by adults, including firefighter, doctor or factory worker