Labour draws strength from MPs' boundary changes

SIR George Young, the rising star at the Treasury, and Sir John Wheeler, the Northern Ireland minister, yesterday joined Norman Lamont as prominent Conservative victims of changes to parliamentary boundaries which are proving far more favourable to Labour than the party feared or the Conservatives hoped.

Mystery beats stalks Chiswick

City dwellers who take comfort from the knowledge that wild beasts are restricted to windswept moors are in for a shock. A mysterious creature - known locally as the Beast of Chiswick - has been skulking through gardens in the early hours, leaving a trail of savaged animals.

Letter: Sunny statistics that light up the satellite Sky

Sir: William Phillips thinks the satellite and cable revolution has stalled ('Clouds in Murdoch's Sky', 3 August). What is the evidence? Average viewing in satellite homes has dropped 7 per cent this year compared with last. But average viewing in all homes has fallen this year. For the last week for which we have figures, the drop is nearly 10 per cent.

Thames ferry route to be revived

PASSENGERS could soon be carried again on an historic river Thames ferry route after the right to run services between Isleworth, west London, and Richmond in south-west London was sold at auction yesterday for pounds 6,000, writes Martin Whitfield.

Money Grouse: What's in a name? In some cases a banking headache

THE SIMPLE act of paying in a cheque can become a headache because of new rules meant to protect against fraud.

Ancient ferry rights up for auction

The right to carry passengers across the Thames between Old Isleworth and Richmond Old Deer Park (above) using a centuries-old ferry crossing will be sold at auction next month.

Victims challenge rising racism

A west London council has given support to a scheme to combat racial harassment with a grant enabling fieldworkers to act as watchdogs on problem estates.

Letter: Forget the collectivist past

I HAVE two points of dispute with Laurence Marks's profile of Madsen Pirie and the account he gives of the excellent work of the Adam Smith Institute ('All the right angles', 10 April).

Clerical error stops trial

The four-day trial of a man accused of trying to suffocate his infant son was declared null because a clerk at Isleworth Crown Court forgot to sign a document of indictment. The ruling came as the jury was considering its verdict.

Beware the camera, it comes to get you

PHOTOGRAPHY is an intrusion, welcome or not. The very quality we value in a piece of photo-reportage is its intrusion upon private reality. Even where a photographer sets up a booth and invites sitters to photograph themselves, the interest of the results derives from an unplanned-for intrusion. The sitter reveals his fantasy self-image - by mistake.

Police offensive against capital's burglars nets 453 suspects: Rhys Williams joins officers on an early-morning house call as part of Operation Bumblebee

IT IS 6am at a house in west London. Three knocks on the front door. 'It's the police.' No answer. A ring of the doorbell, a tap on the window. A shout through the letterbox: 'Hello? It's the police.'

Princess seeks details of gym photo profits: Writs allege breach of confidence and demand permanent ban

WRITS were issued by the Princess of Wales's lawyers yesterday seeking a permanent ban on the publication of photographs of her working out in a gym and demanding that the pictures should be handed over.

Tories to expel NF candidate

TORIES in a west London constituency represented by the only Conservative Asian MP have been stunned to learn that a local party member is to stand as a National Front candidate at a council by-election.

Profile: The British route master at Ford: Alex Trotman: Phil Reeves meets the canny Scot who is taking over the controls of the US car giant

ALEX TROTMAN has six trophies in his office, just to keep his head out of the clouds. They are ornaments from different car bonnets, but they have one common feature: their manufacturers have all gone out of business. 'They are there to remind me the world does not owe us a living,' he says.

Bigamist lawyer is jailed

A SOLICITOR who married bigamously and stole from clients to maintain two former wives and a girlfriend, was jailed yesterday for three years.
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