hei-fi Jon Hamm as Don Draper in Mad Men

Has there has ever been a tougher time to keep schtum, asks Simon Usborne

The Saturday Profile: Robert Carlyle, Actor: A man for all regions

NOBODY LIKES to criticise Robert Carlyle. Fans of lo-fi kitchen sink misery love him for his work with Ken Loach, and point out that he's one of the few actors whom the director has cast twice.

The Information on: Plunkett and Macleane

What Is It?

Film: Scott of the arch antics

Jake Scott, son of Ridley, has just made his first feature film, Plunkett & Macleane. It's MTV meets The Scarlet Pimpernel. But that wasn't the plan.

Arts: I was a teenage usher

You never know. The person checking your ticket for a West End show might just be the new Simon Callow.

Classic yarns beat tales of 90s low life

THE SCOTTISH novel about drugs and low life, Trainspotting, which has also become a hit film, remains less popular in its home country than classics such as Robert Louis Stevenson's Kidnapped and Treasure Island.

A worm that turns

Drinkers in Scottish bars don't offer cash for review copies - except when Irvine Welsh is on the cover. Brian Morton kept the book, and hails a masterpiece

Letter: Movie choice

DAVID PHILLIPS commented on the lack of choice for cinema-goers (Letters, 31 May). In Glasgow there are seven multiplexes showing a total of up to 25 titles in a week. Apart from the occasional Full Monty or Trainspotting, they are all from Hollywood.

Film: The eccentric Great Uncle of film

Cinemagoers won't know how to react to Alan Rudolph's new film `Afterglow' - which is just what he wants. James Mottram on a director who delights in life's contradictions

Film: Never mind the plot, feel the mood

Afterglow

The writing's on the Net

Norman Mailer once said that watching a film based on a book you'd written is as traumatic as having your dog shot. Irvine Welsh, on the other hand, takes a more relaxed view: a film is like a remix of the book, a variation on the same theme. And anyway, he says, what's the point in moaning when you're making loads of money?

Five fading careers revived on celluloid

1 Wet Wet Wet: 'Love Is All Around' - 'Four Weddings And A Funeral'

Books Fiction: One to whizz through

COCAINE by Phil Strongman Abacus pounds 9.99

`Trainspotting' star gets set to break the bank

Rogue Trader, the pounds 8m feature film based on the rise and fall of futures trader Nick Leeson, has begun filming with Trainspotting star Ewan McGregor playing the man who brought down the world's oldest merchant bank.

Film: Dillying with the Dalai

Seven Years in Tibet (PG)

FREE FILM SCREENING: Talkin' about Regeneration

There's sick and there's sick. Jonny Lee Miller (above), who played Sick Boy in Trainspotting, returns in Regeneration (15) as a Geordie soldier struck dumb by shellshock. This being the First World War, he is then sent to a Scottish country-house sanatorium and kicked in the teeth by the class system. "Officers stammer," his doctor witheringly informs him - "it's only the lower ranks who suffer from mutism."
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
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Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
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Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

The big names to look for this fashion week

This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
Al Pacino wows Venice

Al Pacino wows Venice

Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

Neil Lawson Baker interview

‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor