hei-fi Jon Hamm as Don Draper in Mad Men

Has there has ever been a tougher time to keep schtum, asks Simon Usborne

The dynamic trio take film honours to Scotland

Movie culture is thriving north of the border, writes John Arlidge

The lure of a line to another place and a different life

IN HIS literary cartoon in last week's Sunday Review, the brilliant Martin Rowson imagined what would happen if Irvine Welsh's novel Trainspotting met Thomas the Tank Engine. The idea had an unsettling juxtaposition - childish innocence meets youthful decadence, beauty meets the beast. On the one hand, a series of children's stories devised by an Anglican vicar in the late 1940s in which the worst thing that can happen is a spot of bother with some naughty trucks on Gordon's Hill: poop, poop, poop, whistled Henry, peep, peep, peep, replied James. And on the other, junkies and head-cases on the dole in 1990s Edinburgh, where the best thing that can happen is: Just as Sick Boy was about tae scream, he spiked the vein, drew some blood back intae the barrel, and fired the life-giving and life- taking elixir home.

Trainspotting: that's just the way it is

Some people are saying that `Trainspotting', the screen version of Irvine Welsh's novel, glamorises drugs. The people in this photograph think those people are wrong. And they should know. They are former heroin addicts who acted as technical advisers to the film. By Rebecca Fowler

the interview EWAN MCGREGOR, ACTOR TALKS TO BEN THOMPSON

sex, drugs and rock'n'roll; Trainspotting achieves the impossible: a funny, stylish film about heroin. Ewan McGregor's charismatically disreputable performance is pivotal to its success

Postcards from the edge

First it was a best-selling novel, then a West End play. Now it's an acclaimed film. In a rare interview, Irvine Welsh, author of the phenomenal 'Trainspotting', talked to Kevin Macdonald about the journey from page to stage to screen

Shooting up is hard to do

THE CRITICS THEATRE

Strong medicine

The phenomenon of Trainspotting is gathering pace: the book is now a West End play and will soon be a film. Can you stomach it? By Jim White

underrated the case for Gordon Legge

There's an Edinburgh-based writer who's now written three books cataloguing "schemie" culture in Scotland. Books depicting the dead-end aimlessness of lives lived on the margins, whose predominantly male cast find escape in drink, dope and a day at the footie.

Portrait of a disappearing Gorbals

Swing Hammer Swing! Citizens, Glasgow THEATRE

Off the beaten track

SCOTTISH THEATRE ROUND-UP Trainspotting / Citizens, Glasgow Wasted / Tron, Glasgow

BOOK REVIEW / The Acid House - Irvine Welsh: Cape, 9.99

IN HIS stories, Irvine Welsh deals with people who are trapped. The Edinburgh he writes about is the Edinburgh of the under-employed and the ill-employed, the drug addicts and layabouts, the pensioner in 'Granny's Old Junk' who sells heroin to the kids next door, and the many who feel betrayed but are not sure by whom.

THEATRE / Two characters in search of a line

A: WHERE are we?
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The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
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You won't believe your eyes

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