News TV presenter Melanie Sykes has been cautioned for assaulting her husband

The TV presenter was arrested and cautioned after admitting to the offence

My week Steve Wilson druid

Druids have mortgages to pay just like everyone else, so I started work at 11am in the Atlantis Bookshop. With our London Solstice Ceremony tomorrow, people want to know when (1pm British Summer Time is the real midday), where (Parliament Hill this year) and why the ceremony is taking place. To be precise, most people want to know why midday and not sunrise. I explain that sunrise equates to the spring equinox, midday to midsummer, sunset to autumn equinox and midnight to mid-winter, and then get on with selling unusual books to druids, witches and confused tourists. Tonight I check my lottery numbers and iron my robe ready for the big day.

SHORT, SHARP, SHOCKING

Hip on the surface, hard beneath, Charlie Parsons has a handle on the hearts and minds of Britain's youth. His brash, flash style of television is the wave of the future; and, worryingly, a magnet for aspirant TV tyros oStanley Kalms is a capitalist red in tooth and claw He's also got a conscience, agood deal of power, and some very old-fashioned notions about how to save the proper charlie parsons nose don't you know or elseSTUDIES IN POWER

When Talk Radio becomes Bloody Well Shut Up Radio

DO YOU find too many talk shows encourage people to phone in and say what they think? Do you agonise over whether to dial that number? Did you discuss making that call with your partner? How did he or she feel about it? How do phone-ins affect people with heart problems or varicose veins? Have you had a positive or negative experience on the line? Or no experience at all? Do many people experience not having experiences? Call us.

Gay TV: as in lively, bright, playful, merry

Next week the BBC launches its first weekly lesbian and gay series. And it's about camp, not campaigning. Paul Burston explains

If The Word dies, can Big Breakfast survive?

Rhys Williams looks at prospects for the runaway breakfast-TV success now that its stablemate seems doomed

Edinburgh Television Festival: Glib becomes ITV formula for success: Rhys Williams on the Hollywood docu-glitz phenomenon and the failing fortunes of the Big Breakfast

THE Independent Television Commission's dismissal of Carlton's docu-glitz series (that's what they call them now) Hollywood Women is now legendary. 'Glib and superficial' could become the most exciting double- act since Cannon and Ball.

Look Who's Talking: A life of disorganised calm: Hates arguing, loves talking. Gaby Roslin wants to be a TV presenter for ever

AT THE weekends I have a lie-in and don't get up until about 8am. That's a lie-in for me because weekdays I'm usually up long before dawn to get to work.

Media: Sunny side up for breakfast: David Lister meets the rising star of The Big Breakfast's happy riverside cottage kitchen,

A swan glides down the River Lea in Hackney, east London, past a giant milk bottle outside the multi-coloured cottage with its fried egg murals that houses The Big Breakfast. Even in the drizzle you find yourself smiling.

Opinions: Is school uniform a good thing?

RAY HONEYFORD, former headmaster: It's a splendid idea. Absolutely essential. Uniform gives a sense of loyalty and identity. It identifies children outside school too. People would say, 'We saw one of yours misbehaving last night,' and we could identify them. Girls tend to compete about clothes when they wear their own.

Athletics: Akabusi's bouquets and bonhomie: Mike Rowbottom sees a heartfelt farewell for one of Britain's most popular athletes

THEY gave Kriss Akabusi a bouquet after his 400 metres hurdles race yesterday even though he was not the winner. He would probably have got one if he had come last - this, after all, was the final British appearance for a man who has established himself as one of the most popular athletes of his generation.

Morning TV made a fool of me: Channel 4's 'The Big Breakfast' is cheap, nasty, noisy, low-grade . . . and quite brilliant

DAYTIME television is now a joke that has entered the language. For hardworking, metropolitan types to say that they have been watching daytime amounts to a self- conscious boast that they have been wallowing in the grunge of low-intensity culture, hanging out with the housewives and the unemployed.

In bed with . . .Like sleeping in a railway station: Susan De Muth talks to Paula Yates: In the first of a new series, the Big Breakfast presenter explains how she sleeps with all the family and gets up at 3am to hop from one bed to another

Paula Yates is a presenter of Channel 4's 'The Big Breakfast', on which she interviews people in bed. She is also an author and the mother of Fifi Trixibelle, 10, Peaches, 4, and Pixi, 21 2 . She is married to Bob Geldof.

TELEVISION / Morning sickness

AS THE Channel 4 Daily drew to a close last Friday morning, its anchorwoman handed over to its sportscaster for the final time with appropriate commiserations. Then, reality rushed in: 'I don't suppose anybody at home gives two hoots about this,' she said.
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape
eBay's enduring appeal: Online auction site is still the UK's most popular e-commerce retailer

eBay's enduring appeal

The online auction site is still the UK's most popular e-commerce site
Culture Minister Ed Vaizey: ‘lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird’

'Lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird'

Culture Minister Ed Vaizey calls for immediate action to address the problem
Artist Olafur Eliasson's latest large-scale works are inspired by the paintings of JMW Turner

Magic circles: Artist Olafur Eliasson

Eliasson's works will go alongside a new exhibition of JMW Turner at Tate Britain. He tells Jay Merrick why the paintings of his hero are ripe for reinvention
Josephine Dickinson: 'A cochlear implant helped me to discover a new world of sound'

Josephine Dickinson: 'How I discovered a new world of sound'

After going deaf as a child, musician and poet Josephine Dickinson made do with a hearing aid for five decades. Then she had a cochlear implant - and everything changed
Greggs Google fail: Was the bakery's response to its logo mishap a stroke of marketing genius?

Greggs gives lesson in crisis management

After a mishap with their logo, high street staple Greggs went viral this week. But, as Simon Usborne discovers, their social media response was anything but half baked
Matthew McConaughey has been singing the praises of bumbags (shame he doesn't know how to wear one)

Matthew McConaughey sings the praises of bumbags

Shame he doesn't know how to wear one. Harriet Walker explains the dos and don'ts of fanny packs
7 best quadcopters and drones

Flying fun: 7 best quadcopters and drones

From state of the art devices with stabilised cameras to mini gadgets that can soar around the home, we take some flying objects for a spin
Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

The midfielder returned to the Premier League after two years last weekend. The controversial character had much to discuss after his first game back
Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

British No 1 knows his consistency as well as his fitness needs working on as he prepares for the US Open after a ‘very, very up and down’ year
Ferguson: In the heartlands of America, a descent into madness

A descent into madness in America's heartlands

David Usborne arrived in Ferguson, Missouri to be greeted by a scene more redolent of Gaza and Afghanistan
BBC’s filming of raid at Sir Cliff’s home ‘may be result of corruption’

BBC faces corruption allegation over its Sir Cliff police raid coverage

Reporter’s relationship with police under scrutiny as DG is summoned by MPs to explain extensive live broadcast of swoop on singer’s home