Sport

So near and yet so far, Britain’s Olympic sailing supremo Sir Ben Ainslie, four golds and a silver, had to give best to the first Italian winner of the Argo Group Gold Cup, winner of the penultimate Alpari World Match Racing Tour grand prix, Francesco Bruni.

Bunhill: Success spills over with tiny bubbles on the air

ANY publicity really is good publicity.

Forgotten treasures in attic go under hammer: Victorian family heirlooms carefully packed away in 1941 have come to light. Oliver Gillie reports

THE CHATELAINE of Stokesay Court, a Victorian country house near Ludlow in Shropshire, packed up her precious possessions in 1941 when the house was requisitioned for the war effort, expecting that one day she would return to a life of luxury. But those days never returned for Cissy Allcroft and her family and so valuable pictures, china and furniture remained in their wrappings to be rediscovered 50 years later.

Racing / Royal Ascot: Challenge to Turtle sets the standard: Fine weather, fast ground and a hot betting heat bring the meeting to an early boiling point for St James's Palace showdown

WITH temperatures expected to climb into the high 70s, punters in morning suits may find the going a little sticky at Ascot this afternoon. Unfortunately for those who have also backed Turtle Island in the St James's Palace Stakes, however, out where it matters the ground will be getting firmer by the minute.

Bridging history

The Prince of Wales is to unveil a plaque next month to mark the 100th anniversary of the opening of Tower Bridge by his great-great-grandfather, King Edward VII, then Prince of Wales. The 12,000-ton structure, with its two distinctive lifting roadways each 100 feet long and weighing 1,200 tons, carries more than 40,000 vehicles a day and attracts more than half a million visitors a year. No public money has ever gone into the estimated pounds 200 million spent on the bridge.

Obituary: Patricia Hambleden

Patricia Herbert, courtier: born 12 November 1904; Lady of the Bedchamber to the Queen (from 1952 Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother) 1937-94; DCVO 1953, GCVO 1990; JP 1961; married 1928 William, third Viscount Hambleden (died 1948; three sons, two daughters); died Ewelme, Oxfordshire 19 March 1994.

Computers: Feedback: McGonagall not guilty

Your article of 28 January. Am I the 100th person to tell you that it wasn't McGonagall on Queen Victoria, but Alfred Austin, the Poet Laureate, on Edward VII.

They might want a different king but the fight could destroy the Crown

A HORRID incident disturbed the marriage of Bertie, Prince of Wales, in 1863. One of Queen Victoria's grandsons had been forced into a kilt for the occasion. Being German, he thought this was a punishment of some kind. Ushered into St George's Chapel, this little boy pulled out his sgian dhu (a ceremonial dagger) and flung it clattering across the marble floor.

Obituary: Loelia Lindsay

Loelia Mary Ponsonby: born 1902, married 1930 Hugh Richard Arthur, second Duke of Westminster (died 1953; marriage dissolved 1947), 1969 Sir Martin Lindsay of Dowhill Bt (died 1981); died 1 November 1993.

Diary: So is there a gene for it?

THIS NEWSPAPER has never shown any great interest in the alleged relationship between the Prince of Wales and Camilla Parker-Bowles, but there is one historical snippet of information about Mrs Parker- Bowles's ancestry that, I think, is worth recording. It is generally known that Mrs Parker-Bowles is the great granddaughter of King Edward VII's mistress, Alice Keppel, but it appears there is an even more notorious (although charming) royal mistress lurking among her antecedents: Nell Gwyn.

How the health service failed a dying old lady

THE NEGLECT of a dying woman by hospital staff, and managers' attempts to sabotage an independent inquiry provide the most devastating insight into how the NHS can fail the most vulnerable of patients, writes Judy Jones.

THEATRE / Casting Shadows

Scientists have yet to announce the discovery of an acting gene, but there's plenty of physical evidence in the famous theatrical dynasties - the Oliviers, Redgraves and Cusacks to name but three - to suggest that stars are spawn. Be it nature, nurture or both, many of those born into a spotlit world find it impossible to resist, despite the deterrent of odious comparison and the inevitable accusations of nepotism. Georgina Brown rounds up members of the next generation determined to make a name for thems.

Patten in hospital

John Patten, Secretary of State for Education, was admitted to the King Edward VII Hospital for Officers in central London 'for investigation of viral problems'. A spokesman for Mr Patten said the minister had had a viral infection, 'basically gastro-enteritis', for a while and had been advised to go into hospital for tests.

A hat comes in from the cold: Hester Lacey on the summer of the Panama

THE CLASSIC straw Panama hat has lost its fuddy-duddy image. Much in evidence at Wimbledon and Henley, it is the hat to be seen in this summer.

The fact is my fiction has fled

'KILL your darlings.' 'Q' was it? Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, that is, to anyone under 40 and - his only claim to distinction I'd have thought - King Edward VII Professor of English Literature at Cambridge when Leavis was a student.
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 30 January 2015
Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee