Sport

So near and yet so far, Britain’s Olympic sailing supremo Sir Ben Ainslie, four golds and a silver, had to give best to the first Italian winner of the Argo Group Gold Cup, winner of the penultimate Alpari World Match Racing Tour grand prix, Francesco Bruni.

Bunhill: Success spills over with tiny bubbles on the air

ANY publicity really is good publicity.

Forgotten treasures in attic go under hammer: Victorian family heirlooms carefully packed away in 1941 have come to light. Oliver Gillie reports

THE CHATELAINE of Stokesay Court, a Victorian country house near Ludlow in Shropshire, packed up her precious possessions in 1941 when the house was requisitioned for the war effort, expecting that one day she would return to a life of luxury. But those days never returned for Cissy Allcroft and her family and so valuable pictures, china and furniture remained in their wrappings to be rediscovered 50 years later.

Racing / Royal Ascot: Challenge to Turtle sets the standard: Fine weather, fast ground and a hot betting heat bring the meeting to an early boiling point for St James's Palace showdown

WITH temperatures expected to climb into the high 70s, punters in morning suits may find the going a little sticky at Ascot this afternoon. Unfortunately for those who have also backed Turtle Island in the St James's Palace Stakes, however, out where it matters the ground will be getting firmer by the minute.

Bridging history

The Prince of Wales is to unveil a plaque next month to mark the 100th anniversary of the opening of Tower Bridge by his great-great-grandfather, King Edward VII, then Prince of Wales. The 12,000-ton structure, with its two distinctive lifting roadways each 100 feet long and weighing 1,200 tons, carries more than 40,000 vehicles a day and attracts more than half a million visitors a year. No public money has ever gone into the estimated pounds 200 million spent on the bridge.

Obituary: Patricia Hambleden

Patricia Herbert, courtier: born 12 November 1904; Lady of the Bedchamber to the Queen (from 1952 Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother) 1937-94; DCVO 1953, GCVO 1990; JP 1961; married 1928 William, third Viscount Hambleden (died 1948; three sons, two daughters); died Ewelme, Oxfordshire 19 March 1994.

Computers: Feedback: McGonagall not guilty

Your article of 28 January. Am I the 100th person to tell you that it wasn't McGonagall on Queen Victoria, but Alfred Austin, the Poet Laureate, on Edward VII.

They might want a different king but the fight could destroy the Crown

A HORRID incident disturbed the marriage of Bertie, Prince of Wales, in 1863. One of Queen Victoria's grandsons had been forced into a kilt for the occasion. Being German, he thought this was a punishment of some kind. Ushered into St George's Chapel, this little boy pulled out his sgian dhu (a ceremonial dagger) and flung it clattering across the marble floor.

Obituary: Loelia Lindsay

Loelia Mary Ponsonby: born 1902, married 1930 Hugh Richard Arthur, second Duke of Westminster (died 1953; marriage dissolved 1947), 1969 Sir Martin Lindsay of Dowhill Bt (died 1981); died 1 November 1993.

Diary: So is there a gene for it?

THIS NEWSPAPER has never shown any great interest in the alleged relationship between the Prince of Wales and Camilla Parker-Bowles, but there is one historical snippet of information about Mrs Parker- Bowles's ancestry that, I think, is worth recording. It is generally known that Mrs Parker-Bowles is the great granddaughter of King Edward VII's mistress, Alice Keppel, but it appears there is an even more notorious (although charming) royal mistress lurking among her antecedents: Nell Gwyn.

How the health service failed a dying old lady

THE NEGLECT of a dying woman by hospital staff, and managers' attempts to sabotage an independent inquiry provide the most devastating insight into how the NHS can fail the most vulnerable of patients, writes Judy Jones.

THEATRE / Casting Shadows

Scientists have yet to announce the discovery of an acting gene, but there's plenty of physical evidence in the famous theatrical dynasties - the Oliviers, Redgraves and Cusacks to name but three - to suggest that stars are spawn. Be it nature, nurture or both, many of those born into a spotlit world find it impossible to resist, despite the deterrent of odious comparison and the inevitable accusations of nepotism. Georgina Brown rounds up members of the next generation determined to make a name for thems.

Patten in hospital

John Patten, Secretary of State for Education, was admitted to the King Edward VII Hospital for Officers in central London 'for investigation of viral problems'. A spokesman for Mr Patten said the minister had had a viral infection, 'basically gastro-enteritis', for a while and had been advised to go into hospital for tests.

A hat comes in from the cold: Hester Lacey on the summer of the Panama

THE CLASSIC straw Panama hat has lost its fuddy-duddy image. Much in evidence at Wimbledon and Henley, it is the hat to be seen in this summer.

The fact is my fiction has fled

'KILL your darlings.' 'Q' was it? Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, that is, to anyone under 40 and - his only claim to distinction I'd have thought - King Edward VII Professor of English Literature at Cambridge when Leavis was a student.
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Prague, Budapest and Vienna
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Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

Climate change key in Syrian conflict

And it will trigger more war in future
How I outwitted the Gestapo

How I outwitted the Gestapo

My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
The nation's favourite animal revealed

The nation's favourite animal revealed

Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
Is this the way to get young people to vote?

Getting young people to vote

From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn