Sport

So near and yet so far, Britain’s Olympic sailing supremo Sir Ben Ainslie, four golds and a silver, had to give best to the first Italian winner of the Argo Group Gold Cup, winner of the penultimate Alpari World Match Racing Tour grand prix, Francesco Bruni.

Bunhill: Success spills over with tiny bubbles on the air

ANY publicity really is good publicity.

Forgotten treasures in attic go under hammer: Victorian family heirlooms carefully packed away in 1941 have come to light. Oliver Gillie reports

THE CHATELAINE of Stokesay Court, a Victorian country house near Ludlow in Shropshire, packed up her precious possessions in 1941 when the house was requisitioned for the war effort, expecting that one day she would return to a life of luxury. But those days never returned for Cissy Allcroft and her family and so valuable pictures, china and furniture remained in their wrappings to be rediscovered 50 years later.

Racing / Royal Ascot: Challenge to Turtle sets the standard: Fine weather, fast ground and a hot betting heat bring the meeting to an early boiling point for St James's Palace showdown

WITH temperatures expected to climb into the high 70s, punters in morning suits may find the going a little sticky at Ascot this afternoon. Unfortunately for those who have also backed Turtle Island in the St James's Palace Stakes, however, out where it matters the ground will be getting firmer by the minute.

Bridging history

The Prince of Wales is to unveil a plaque next month to mark the 100th anniversary of the opening of Tower Bridge by his great-great-grandfather, King Edward VII, then Prince of Wales. The 12,000-ton structure, with its two distinctive lifting roadways each 100 feet long and weighing 1,200 tons, carries more than 40,000 vehicles a day and attracts more than half a million visitors a year. No public money has ever gone into the estimated pounds 200 million spent on the bridge.

Obituary: Patricia Hambleden

Patricia Herbert, courtier: born 12 November 1904; Lady of the Bedchamber to the Queen (from 1952 Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother) 1937-94; DCVO 1953, GCVO 1990; JP 1961; married 1928 William, third Viscount Hambleden (died 1948; three sons, two daughters); died Ewelme, Oxfordshire 19 March 1994.

Computers: Feedback: McGonagall not guilty

Your article of 28 January. Am I the 100th person to tell you that it wasn't McGonagall on Queen Victoria, but Alfred Austin, the Poet Laureate, on Edward VII.

They might want a different king but the fight could destroy the Crown

A HORRID incident disturbed the marriage of Bertie, Prince of Wales, in 1863. One of Queen Victoria's grandsons had been forced into a kilt for the occasion. Being German, he thought this was a punishment of some kind. Ushered into St George's Chapel, this little boy pulled out his sgian dhu (a ceremonial dagger) and flung it clattering across the marble floor.

Obituary: Loelia Lindsay

Loelia Mary Ponsonby: born 1902, married 1930 Hugh Richard Arthur, second Duke of Westminster (died 1953; marriage dissolved 1947), 1969 Sir Martin Lindsay of Dowhill Bt (died 1981); died 1 November 1993.

Diary: So is there a gene for it?

THIS NEWSPAPER has never shown any great interest in the alleged relationship between the Prince of Wales and Camilla Parker-Bowles, but there is one historical snippet of information about Mrs Parker- Bowles's ancestry that, I think, is worth recording. It is generally known that Mrs Parker-Bowles is the great granddaughter of King Edward VII's mistress, Alice Keppel, but it appears there is an even more notorious (although charming) royal mistress lurking among her antecedents: Nell Gwyn.

How the health service failed a dying old lady

THE NEGLECT of a dying woman by hospital staff, and managers' attempts to sabotage an independent inquiry provide the most devastating insight into how the NHS can fail the most vulnerable of patients, writes Judy Jones.

THEATRE / Casting Shadows

Scientists have yet to announce the discovery of an acting gene, but there's plenty of physical evidence in the famous theatrical dynasties - the Oliviers, Redgraves and Cusacks to name but three - to suggest that stars are spawn. Be it nature, nurture or both, many of those born into a spotlit world find it impossible to resist, despite the deterrent of odious comparison and the inevitable accusations of nepotism. Georgina Brown rounds up members of the next generation determined to make a name for thems.

Patten in hospital

John Patten, Secretary of State for Education, was admitted to the King Edward VII Hospital for Officers in central London 'for investigation of viral problems'. A spokesman for Mr Patten said the minister had had a viral infection, 'basically gastro-enteritis', for a while and had been advised to go into hospital for tests.

A hat comes in from the cold: Hester Lacey on the summer of the Panama

THE CLASSIC straw Panama hat has lost its fuddy-duddy image. Much in evidence at Wimbledon and Henley, it is the hat to be seen in this summer.

The fact is my fiction has fled

'KILL your darlings.' 'Q' was it? Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, that is, to anyone under 40 and - his only claim to distinction I'd have thought - King Edward VII Professor of English Literature at Cambridge when Leavis was a student.
Arts and Entertainment
Sydney and Melbourne are locked in a row over giant milk crates
art
News
Kenny Ireland, pictured in 2010.
peopleActor, from House of Cards and Benidorm, was 68
News
A scene from the video shows students mock rioting
newsEnd-of-year leaver's YouTube film features staging of a playground gun massacre
Travel
travel
Voices
A family sit and enjoy a quiet train journey
voicesForcing us to overhear dull phone conversations is an offensive act, says Simon Kelner
News
i100This Instagram photo does not prove Russian army is in Ukraine
News
Morrissey pictured in 2013
people
Sport
sportVan Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Environment
View from the Llanberis Track to the mountain lake Llyn
Du’r Arddu
environmentA large chunk of Mount Snowdon, in north Wales, is up for sale
Life and Style
Martha Stewart wrote an opinion column for Time magazine this week titled “Why I Love My Drone”
lifeLifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot... to take photos of her farm
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

In grandfather's footsteps

5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

Martha Stewart has flying robot

The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

A tale of two presidents

George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

The dining car makes a comeback

Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

Gallery rage

How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

Eye on the prize

Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Women's rugby: Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup

Women's rugby

Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices