Mad Men

TV review: Mad Men - That's a hell of a routine you've got there,

There can't be many men on television less self-aware than Don Draper. In this double bill to begin series six of Mad Men, the first scene proper showed Don sweltering on Waikiki beach reading Dante's Inferno. Even in paradise, the wretched Don is in hell – but of course not a ripple of irony disturbs his furrowed brow.

Bob Levenson: Advertising director who helped inspire the series

Bob Levenson was considered by his peers as one of the best ever advertising copywriters, if not the best, one of the original "Mad Men" who launched the creative revolution on Manhattan's Madison Avenue in the 1960s and tossed conventional ideas out of the window. During more than a quarter of a century at Doyle Dane Bernbach (DDB) – said to have been the model for the Mad Men TV series – Levenson created many of the ads which changed the face of advertising, in the cinema and in the rocketing new phenomenon that was commercial television. He won every award in the business, several times over, was elected in 1972 to the Copywriters' Hall of Fame (now known as the Creative Hall of Fame) and was often described as "the writer's writer".

Buckle up for the ride

This fashionable It-bag started life at a kitchen table, says Harriet Walker. Now the Cambridge Satchel Company is going to town

Alison Brie: Mad about the girl

She is best known for her role as Pete Campbell's wife, Trudy, in Mad Men, but her comic timing and convincing British accent reveal she's destined for big-screen success

Celebrity: Mommie weirdest

Celebrity mothers have it hard. Not only are their birthing methods scrutinised but their post-pregnancy bodies are debated endlessly and their choice of baby names mocked.

The armchair guide to Mad Men

The advertising-agency drama returns for its fifth season next week. Already lost the plot? Will Dean, author of the definitive book on the show, brings you up to speed

More headlines

Meet the BBC's Mad Men

Evocative design, sexual politics, media buzz – but the creator and cast of The Hour tell Gerard Gilbert that they aren't just jumping on the 1950s bandwagon