Mad Men

TV review: Mad Men - That's a hell of a routine you've got there,

There can't be many men on television less self-aware than Don Draper. In this double bill to begin series six of Mad Men, the first scene proper showed Don sweltering on Waikiki beach reading Dante's Inferno. Even in paradise, the wretched Don is in hell – but of course not a ripple of irony disturbs his furrowed brow.

The Mad Women of Mad Men actually represent us all

Behind every successful Mad Man is a female character that any actress would audition every day for a year to play. Mad Men may be set in a world where gender equality is a distant dream, but it's written and produced in the future: by the third season, more than half of its writers were women, which is a vanishingly rare statistic.

'Bill Clinton told me to keep Homeland going'

Mandy Patinkin stars in the wildly successful drama Homeland, which cleaned up at the Emmys this week. On the eve of the show's second season, he talks to James Mottram about life in an unqualified hit

Jon Hamm in not-so-hot shocker.

If you're a man, and as of yet, you are not quite as hot as Jon Hamm, don't despair; there's still hope. You may grow into it. For even Jon Hamm wasn't always so hot.

The armchair guide to Mad Men

The advertising-agency drama returns for its fifth season next week. Already lost the plot? Will Dean, author of the definitive book on the show, brings you up to speed

i Editor's Letter: Some answers to i's FAQs

As I said yesterday, readers, old and new, have been emailing in your droves – some of you not even about Scotland! For the benefit of newer readers, I have pledged – foolishly – to read all your mail, and that either Hannah Nicholls or I will reply if you need one. Please put your name and hometown on emails, and remember if you text, that we cannot text back.

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Meet the BBC's Mad Men

Evocative design, sexual politics, media buzz – but the creator and cast of The Hour tell Gerard Gilbert that they aren't just jumping on the 1950s bandwagon

All About Love, By Lisa Appignanesi
Love: a History, By Simon May

Our shelves groan with love. Out in the visual world, sex sells, but take down any novel, book of poetry or biography and it's clear that, on the page, love is most often the hook. As a magic word that all can use, but few define, its potency might be down to nothing more than the bewildering variety of experiences it covers, next to which the supposedly exotic range of options on the sexual menu seems staid. That this one word can be applied to romantic love, parental love, love between friends and love of God seems perverse, as if it is a deliberate semantic ploy to complicate and intensify our lives.