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George Ortiz was one of the great contemporary collectors. He came to public attention in 1994, when the Royal Academy showed his breathtaking collection of antiquities. Not all were impressed: Lord Renfrew criticised the show, talking of “the large-scale looting which is the ultimate source of so much of what he is able to exhibit.” This stung, because Ortiz’s collecting was guided by the concept of André Malraux’s Musée Imaginaire, where objects could be viewed without the preconceptions that grouped them by country and period – contrary to the traditional practice of curators and art historians.

Sarah Sands: Where would we be without our decorative women?

The official guidance at the start of the royal tour of Canada was that Kate would be seen and not heard. I wonder if Prince William was advised to be heard and not seen, for he has been edited out of most of the newspaper photographs.

24-hour Room Service: Hotel Sezz, St-Tropez

Like the movie stars who put it on the map, St-Tropez is smaller in the flesh than you might imagine. Watching locals play late-afternoon boules in the town square, dwarfed on every side by sea, sky and rugged Provençal mountains, it's hard to reconcile this place with its fabled excesses (until you realise that those rustic, cobbled alleys are lined with designer brands, or you take a closer look at the prices on the menus).

Harriet Walker: 'In warm weather, the city comes to life and food is at its core'

Living in London during the summer is something like living in the souks but with none of the exotic, spicy charm. About seven million of us crammed in higgledy-piggledy, in such close proximity to one another that no man's dinner remains unique, thanks to the person frying garlic on the ground floor. Even the rice pudding tastes of it.

Azerbaijan admits censorship at Biennale

The work of one of Azerbaijan's leading artists, at the centre of an embarrassing dispute at the prestigious Venice Art Biennale, has been removed from the festival after the country's President apparently intervened to say the works were distasteful.

Shelagh Wakeley: Experimental artist whose work encompassed architecture and design

Shelagh Wakely was an experimental artist who combined in a very personal and original way the worlds of visual art, architecture and design. She made many commissioned works for public spaces in Britain and abroad, among them Curcuma sul travertino, made up of loose turmeric scattered in baroque patterns on the travertine marble floors of the British School in Rome (1991). A scent of turmeric filled the air until the piece was swept up at the end of three weeks. More recently she designed a mosaic for the new south porch tympanum of the Royal Albert Hall, and an ambitious installation incorporating the shadow of a tree and glass paving slabs encapsulating aluminium leaf patterned by falling rain for the Marunouchi building in Tokyo.

Venetian mask: Azerbaijan censors its own Biennale entry

The Azerbaijan government has staged a literal cover-up at this year's Venice Biennale, the world's most high-profile showcase of contemporary art, by hiding the work of one of its own artists beneath a piece of cloth.

Mladic extradited to The Hague after losing appeal

Ratko Mladic arrived in The Hague last night to face war crimes charges after a Belgrade court rejected his appeal against extradition.

Peter York: Revealed: Gaddafi's taste for despot chic

Pictures of Libya's embattled tyrant in talks with the South African President reveal a taste in interior design that could only be a dictator's

Mladic allowed to visit grave of his daughter

As he awaited extradition to a UN tribunal, jailed war crimes suspect Ratko Mladic has been allowed to visit the grave of his daughter who committed suicide during Bosnia's war.

Booking in for an overnight stay: fans celebrate library's 100th anniversary

New York Public Library celebrated its 100th anniversary yesterday. Its landmark Fifth Avenue building has nurtured generations of scholars and boasts such treasures as a Gutenberg Bible and an early copy of the Declaration of Independence.

St Giles: The psychogeography of London's Rookery

An exhibition of new works and artefacts charting the history of the notorious St Giles slum opens tomorrow

Circle of Animals, Somerset House, London<br/>Ai Weiwei, Lisson Gallery, London

Chinese sculptor Ai Weiwei is eloquent, even when held by his government, in two UK shows

Charles Nevin: Don't let fun fatigue blight your week

Start the week...

Kitchen confidential: The style set reveal their cookery quarters

Is it now the room that says the most about our taste and personalities?
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 1 May 2015
Fishing for votes with Nigel Farage: The Ukip leader shows how he can work an audience as he casts his line to the disaffected of Grimsby

Fishing is on Nigel Farage's mind

Ukip leader casts a line to the disaffected
Who is bombing whom in the Middle East? It's amazing they don't all hit each other

Who is bombing whom in the Middle East?

Robert Fisk untangles the countries and factions
China's influence on fashion: At the top of the game both creatively and commercially

China's influence on fashion

At the top of the game both creatively and commercially
Lord O’Donnell: Former cabinet secretary on the election and life away from the levers of power

The man known as GOD has a reputation for getting the job done

Lord O'Donnell's three principles of rule
Rainbow shades: It's all bright on the night

Rainbow shades

It's all bright on the night
'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before