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George Ortiz was one of the great contemporary collectors. He came to public attention in 1994, when the Royal Academy showed his breathtaking collection of antiquities. Not all were impressed: Lord Renfrew criticised the show, talking of “the large-scale looting which is the ultimate source of so much of what he is able to exhibit.” This stung, because Ortiz’s collecting was guided by the concept of André Malraux’s Musée Imaginaire, where objects could be viewed without the preconceptions that grouped them by country and period – contrary to the traditional practice of curators and art historians.

Kitchen confidential: The style set reveal their cookery quarters

Is it now the room that says the most about our taste and personalities?

Catwalk models, butlers and £300 plates of sea snails for visiting royals

Truffles sparkling with gold leaf and £60,000 bottles of champagne are some of the treats awaiting the foreign royalty who descend on London for this week's wedding, as the capital's five-star hotels, exclusive restaurants and luxury services industry – which includes everyone from chauffeurs to shopping chaperones – prepares for perhaps its richest single influx of customers ever.

Heads Up: Ai Weiwei

Sunflower seeds to CCTV cameras – it's all eyes on Ai

'To throw it away now would break our hearts'

DJ Campbell and Blackpool made a flying start but are now struggling to remain in the top flight. The striker tells Tim Rich why staying there means so much

Going potty: Anna Pavord's greenhouse is getting a bit crowded

Our greenhouse, now just over a year old, evolved from a shed that was already in place, so its dimensions (roughly 4m wide by 2.65m long) were pre-determined. To a great extent, so was its function. I wanted to grow a nectarine on the solid back wall, which faces west. And I've got more and more interested in growing plants in pots to bring into the house. But until the arrival of the greenhouse, I was hampered by having few places to keep them while they were revving up for their performance. Fortunately, the south facing side of the new space has proved to be an ideal place in which to bring them on.

Wastwater, Royal Court Downstairs, London<br/>Terminus, Young Vic Maria, London<br/>Hotel Confessions, Bermondsey Square Hotel, London

In the shadow of Heathrow airport, a few souls go about their wretched lives. Thank goodness, then, for six soaring performances

On The Road: Getting steamy in Istanbul's spa of the sultans

Stepping into one of Istanbul's hammams is like parting steamy curtains on to ancient Asia Minor. Visitors bake on marble slabs, sweating out life's impurities; attendants massage, pummel and buff; bathers emerge baby soft and squeaky clean.

China: Has the moment finally arrived for Shanghai's pleasure palace?

After 50 years and &#163;41m, Victor Sassoon's elegant Art Deco hotel is back. He'd be pleased with how the old girl has turned out, says Adrian Mourby

The eccentric architecture of death

The restoration of Sir Richard Burton&rsquo;s tomb may be a relatively small event &ndash; but it&rsquo;s a very important one, says Jay Merrick

Ecstasy, Hampstead Theatre, London

Mike Leigh has broken the habit of a lifetime and returned to direct one of his stage plays for the second time. You can see why he has been reluctant hitherto. Given the improvisatory techniques and the exhaustive research into character that goes into the creation of a Mike Leigh piece, the original actors might be said to "own" the material in a deeper sense than is normally meant by the term. How could you hope to re-create in rehearsal that intimate sense of mutual discovery with actors coming to the finished product cold?

With 500 days to go, Olympic Park is on schedule

the chief executive of London 2012, Paul Deighton, admits that the Olympic Park may look like "a building site" right up to the opening ceremony, but insists there will be no skin-of-the-teeth finish such as Athens experienced in 2004.

Frank Buckles: The last American survivor of the First World War

No one knows quite why American soldiers were once known as "doughboys". But Frank Buckles was indisputably the very last of them – the sole American still alive who went to Europe to fight in the First World War, after the US entered the conflict in 1917.

Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra/ Rattle, Barbican Hall

They’ve called this unprecedented five-day residency “The London Concerts” and having already shown off the youthful core of players at the heart of this venerable and venerated orchestra, the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra duly expanded from chamber to symphonic proportions and crossed the river from the Southbank to the Barbican for what was by any standards a wondrous display of high-end artistry.

Stewart Williams: Noted publisher whose books brought the history of Cardiff to life

"I'm Cardiff born and I'm Cardiff bred, and when I dies I'll be Cardiff dead." Although Stewart Williams died a few miles outside the city's boundaries, Frank Hennessy's song always brings him to mind. For the publisher and local historian who devoted his energies, and in the early days a lot of his own money, to recording Cardiff's growth from sleepy fishing village to the largest coal-exporting port in the world and then, in our own time, to administrative capital of Wales, was a proud Cardiffian.

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