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George Ortiz was one of the great contemporary collectors. He came to public attention in 1994, when the Royal Academy showed his breathtaking collection of antiquities. Not all were impressed: Lord Renfrew criticised the show, talking of “the large-scale looting which is the ultimate source of so much of what he is able to exhibit.” This stung, because Ortiz’s collecting was guided by the concept of André Malraux’s Musée Imaginaire, where objects could be viewed without the preconceptions that grouped them by country and period – contrary to the traditional practice of curators and art historians.

Thai couple kiss for a record 46 hours

It was one long kiss for a couple – one record-breaking embrace for mankind.

The Experts' Guide To The World: Milan

The classic tourist trail through central Milan starts at Il Duomo, the incomparable Gothic cathedral and the piazza and Galleria that abut it, then heads north-east via Monte Napoleone, where all the fashion boutiques are, to the Gallery of Modern Art, housed in a late-18th-century stately home, and the Giardini Pubblici, the city centre's best park. If you've seen those, you can't say you have done Milan, but you have taken a significant bite.

Now cross your legs: Britain's public lavatories are vanishing fast

Name a lavatory Emerald Isle and you might expect to be derided. Public conveniences rarely invite allusions to precious stones or sun-kissed atolls. Those on Notting Hill's Westbourne Grove are an exception. Housed alongside a florist in a building designed with the sleek lines of a Victorian steam yacht, they are some of the more inviting loos in London.

Will full-time study become an expensive luxury?

The demand for flexible learning shows no signs of abating.

Last Night's TV - The Chinese Are Coming, BBC2; Blue Bloods, Sky Atlantic

Getting the most out of Africa

The Life of the Mind: Love, Sorrow and Obsession, New Art Gallery, Walsall

This group show with a rather grandiose title has been curated by a Turner-shortlisted male artist who goes by the name of Bob and Roberta Smith. Smith has been artist-in-residence at the New Art Gallery, Walsall, combing through a remarkable archive of the works and personal effects of Jacob Epstein, which were bequeathed to the city by Epstein's widow in 1973.

Robert McCabe: 'A successful photograph can create the same emotion in our soul as a poem'

I was very lucky to have the opportunity to photograph in the Greek islands before they were overwhelmed with tourists, at a time when life had not changed for millennia and traditions were intact. I don't think it's an exaggeration to say that daily life in the islands has changed more in the last 40 years than it did in the previous 4,000 years. When I first visited the Aegean, in 1954, there were, essentially, no motor vehicles, no running water, no electricity, no telephones, no docks for the inter-island steamers. Donkey or mule was the way to travel. The water you drank was what you collected during the winter rains, or that you carried.

Rupert Cornwell: Long, hard road to a black history museum

Out of America: Washington has museums aplenty commemorating almost every aspect of US life, but not one devoted to African Americans

It's tough at the top: Meet the builders behind Europe's tallest tower

The cramped crane cabin that Andy Bowden spends 12 hours working inside every day is much the same as any other. There is his leather swivel seat armed with two small levers to control the hoist, a heater to keep both him and his flasks of soup warm, and a roll of loo roll that he insists is purely for his runny nose.

My Life In Travel: Anneka Rice, television presenter

The My Life in Travel column is produced in association with Andalucia Tourism. See <a href="http://www.andalucia.org" target="new">www.andalucia.org</a>

Blind tourists: Sightseeing by sound

Holidays always present challenges, but blind tourists face particular problems, as the BBC's Peter White can testify. A sense of terror can be part of the pleasure, he tells Simon Calder

The fall of Saigon &ndash; by demolition

The colonial city that enchanted Graham Greene is disappearing as developers tear down its historic buildings in the name of modernisation

My Passion, The Crypt, London

They've toured and toured, and they're on bedroom walls everywhere, but this year one five-piece will really take off

24-Hour Room Service: Pera Palace Hotel, Istanbul

History revisited in the heart of Istanbul
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent