Extras

As the temperatures dip, the birds need our help. We round-up the most innovative (and occasionally bonkers) feeders and houses for our feathered friends

Great Works: Bathers (1902-06), Paul Cézanne

Private collection

Bathers (1902-06), Paul Cézanne

Private collection

To get ahead on the arts scene, go to Glasgow

This city on the Clyde is an artistic powerhouse, but it retains a rough-edged cool. Norman Miller samples its varied galleries

Great Works: The New Word in Golf (1920s) H M Bateman

Private collection

Truth about love: New lyrics of loss, and joy, for grown-up Valentines

After an age of irony, love poetry for adults has returned. And often it takes the form of the elegy.

Great Works: The Living Mirror, René Magritte (1928)

Private collection

Giacometti sculpture sells for world record £65m

A life-size bronze sculpture by Alberto Giacometti has been sold at auction for the world record price of £65,001,250.

Picasso's 'Tete de Femme' breaks cover to fetch £8.1m

A Picasso masterpiece unseen in public for 43 years fetched more than twice its expected price at auction - going for £8.1 million.

Important Artifacts..., By Leanne Shapton

The full title would take up half a column, for this innovative and intriguing novel in captioned photographs marches under the wordy banner of Important Artifacts and Personal Property from the Collection of Lenore Doolan and Harold Morris, including Books, Street Fashion and Jewelry. It takes the form of a mock-auction catalogue from a Manhattan sales house, and purports to offer a miscellany of lots with explanatory notes – flower petals to claret bottles, knickers to sunglasses, books to menus, postcards to photos. All in some way mark the beginning, flourishing and fall of a New York romance from 2002 to 2006. It's a cute idea – Annie Hall (a sporadic allusion) meets confessional conceptual art – and Leanne Shapton brings it off in style.

Lisa Markwell: No presents this year, then. If I dare

The same conversation has been heard in my household for the past 18 Decembers. "Darling, I hope you haven't got me a Christmas present... I'm not getting you one. Don't you think that's sensible?" Yesterday, I heard the 2009 version, which had the added virtue and piquancy (or so he thinks) of chiming with the economic situation across the land.

Christina Patterson: Is this what they mean by care in the NHS?

How complicated can it be for a breast-care nurse to master the procedures of a clinic

On trial: the question of what is modern art

To the uneducated eye, there is very little difference between the work of sculptor César Baldaccini and a block of scrapyard – a characteristic exploited by two French brothers. John Lichfield reports from Paris

Imagine: The year of Anish Kapoor, BBC1<br/>Where is Modern Art Now? BBC4<br/>The Art on Your Wall, BBC1

There was an awful lot of art on the BBC last week, starting with a portrait of a charmer

Errors & Omissions: Sometimes just the simple facts will do &ndash; and no fatuous extras

If you try to tart up simple information with topical chat you risk turning fatuous. An article on Wednesday about design discussed the origins of the word "ergonomics": "Those who are irritated by composites like Brangelina or Jedward won't like this, but ergonomics is a portmanteau word too – a combination of the Greek ergos and nomos (work and natural laws)."

Great Works: Still Life with Peaches (c AD50) Anon

Classical art is often given a classic status. The works of the ancient Greeks and Romans have been taken up by many later artists as supreme examples. At least that's true of their statues and buildings. But when it comes to paintings, there's a problem. Very little remains, and what remains is puzzling.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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