Arts and Entertainment

The singular comic talents of Stefan Golaszewski are mostly expended on works for television - as in Him & Her, a sitcom that applies Royle Family techniques to twentysomething slackerdom with intermittently hilarious results.

Cultural Life: Neil LaBute, playwright

Films: I've been on a French cinema kick for many years now – recently loved 'Mademoiselle Chambon' (simple and heartbreaking) in the cinema and 'A Prophet' (brutal, devastating) again on DVD. Also saw part one of 'Mesrine', the Vincent Cassel crime epic, and can't wait to see the second half. Rented a film I didn't know called 'The Man of My Life', starring Charles Berling; the film was a bit fussy technically but Berling created a touching portrait of a charming, restless gay loner.

This Is How It Goes, King's Head Theatre, London

Seb Billings's revival of this 2005 play by Neil LaBute opens and closes to the sound of Dean Martin slurring out "Everybody Loves Somebody". On both occasions, the recording gets stuck on the word "now" and is then replaced by a harsh contemporary techno-beat. It's a telling, witty touch – and not just because Martin's warm, easy-going manner and message feel peculiarly alien in the ruthless LaBute world of manipulation and misogyny. The snatch of song also underlines the fact that love did once exist between high-school sweethearts Cody and Belinda, whose 12-year marriage starts to unravel terminally when a long-lost fellow pupil returns to their Midwest town and rents the spare room. As a fat misfit teenager, this figure (generically named Man) had fancied Belinda. Slimmed down and claiming to be an ex-lawyer, he has the opportunity to turn his dream to reality.

You never can tell: George Bernard Shaw, the secret snapper

George Bernard Shaw once wrote: "If Velasquez was born today, he would be a photographer and not a painter." But the Irish playwright may also have thought his true calling lay behind the camera, according to researchers who have rediscovered more than 20,000 of his photographs.

All the Globe's a stage – even for women writers

As Shakespeare's theatre opens its doors today for the first time to a play by a female writer, Rachel Shields reports on a wider theatrical revolution

First Night: Black Swan, Venice Film Festival, Opening Gala

Portman's scintillating turn as prima ballerina opens Venice festival in style

England rebooted: Shane Meadows is revisiting This Is England on the small screen

It's all part of his plan to invigorate 'appalling' British television, he tells Gerard Gilbert

Jonathan Ross returning to the BBC

Jonathan Ross is to return to the BBC less than three months after his high-profile departure, to host a movie awards show, it was announced today.

Darkness and despair: that's dance on screen

Darren Aronofsky's Black Swan is the latest film to explore the keen contrast between surface grace and extreme pressure in ballet. Sarah Hughes examines a movie obsession

Mikhail Shatrov: Playwright whose work asserted that Stalinism was a deviation from Leninism

Mikhail Shatrov was one of the Soviet Union's pre-eminent playwrights, producing a series of historical dramas that used archival sources to portray Stalinism as a deviation from Leninism. Nevertheless, even under Stalin's successors Khrushchev and Brezhnev, several of his plays were banned.

The Last Airbender, M Night Shyamalan, 103 mins (PG)

Derivative plot, feeble characters, clunking dialogue, embarrassingly bad 3D special effects – M Night Shyamalan is at it again with his latest fantasy adventure

The Last Airbender In 3D (PG)

It comes as an anticlimax that M Night Shyamalan's much reviled fantasy epic isn't quite as bad as the more bilious US reviewers had suggested.

Suso Cecchi D'Amico: Screenwriter for De Sica and Visconti who also worked with Wyler, Zeffirelli and Jarman

Suso Cecchi D'Amico was Italy's most illustrious screenwriter; she contributed to classic films such as Bicycle Thieves and The Leopard, and collaborated with some of Italy's most distinguished directors, among them Antonioni, De Sica and Monicelli. She had a particularly rewarding association with Luchino Visconti, for whom she was a major scriptwriter on almost all his films from Bellissima (1951) to The Innocent (1976).

Knight and Day, James Mangold, 110 mins (12A)

We are meant to be dazzled by the sophisticated locations and baffled by the plot, but the real mystery is why anyone bothered
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Fishing for votes with Nigel Farage: The Ukip leader shows how he can work an audience as he casts his line to the disaffected of Grimsby

Fishing is on Nigel Farage's mind

Ukip leader casts a line to the disaffected
Who is bombing whom in the Middle East? It's amazing they don't all hit each other

Who is bombing whom in the Middle East?

Robert Fisk untangles the countries and factions
China's influence on fashion: At the top of the game both creatively and commercially

China's influence on fashion

At the top of the game both creatively and commercially
Lord O’Donnell: Former cabinet secretary on the election and life away from the levers of power

The man known as GOD has a reputation for getting the job done

Lord O'Donnell's three principles of rule
Rainbow shades: It's all bright on the night

Rainbow shades

It's all bright on the night
'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before