Arts and Entertainment

The singular comic talents of Stefan Golaszewski are mostly expended on works for television - as in Him & Her, a sitcom that applies Royle Family techniques to twentysomething slackerdom with intermittently hilarious results.

Watch Simon Kelner as Editor Scissorhands

An independent film collective has created a new short featuring i editor Simon Kelner.

Screen Talk: Eagle takes flight

Modern-day movie moguls are generally money men in suits, playing with stock money and gambling with other people's fortunes.

Arthur Laurents: Playwright and screenwriter who wrote the books for 'West Side Story' and 'Gypsy'

The playwright and screenwriter Arthur Laurents wrote the books for two true classics of musical theatre, West Side Story (1957) and Gypsy (1959), and directed the hit musical La Cage aux Folles (1983).

DVD: Black Swan, For retail & rental (20th Century Fox)

Darren Aronofsky's exotic mix of backstage soap opera and gothic horror movie is tosh, really: being cast as the lead in Swan Lake wouldn't turn anyone into a gibbering psycho, even someone as highly strung as Natalie Portman's fledgling ballerina.

DVD: Black Swan (15)

How do you solve a problem like Aronofsky? His films are so full of vim and tricksiness, but precious little humanity (Mickey Rourke's fighter in The Wrestler perhaps being the exception).

Steele forced to make U-turn on director role

There is, just about, a difference between the Rugby Football Union and Fred Karno's Army, but only in the sense that the latter deliberately set out to be funny. Yesterday, the governing body's management board – which, to the best of anyone's knowledge, has never included either Charlie Chaplin or Stan Laurel, although rumours to the contrary continue to circulate – forced their chief executive, John Steele, into a humiliating U-turn on the sensitive subject of the Twickenham performance directorship. As a consequence, the union was left looking every bit as daft as it did during the civil wars of the mid-1990s.

Book Of A Lifetime: In Cold Blood, By Truman Capote

When Truman Capote's 'In Cold Blood' was first published in 1966, he characterised it as the first "non-fiction novel". What remains remarkable about it, even in a market suffused with narrative history, is Capote's ground-breaking ability to fuse fact with the hard-won skills of fiction. The book – for which he made a reputed 8000 pages of research notes – is plotted and structured with taut writerly flair. Its characters pulse with recognisable life; its places are palpable. Careful prose binds the reader to his unfolding story. Put simply, the book was conceived of journalism and born of a novelist.

The comedy gang: The Jewish youth group that made Sacha Baron Cohen

Mike Leigh was a member – and so were David Baddiel and Sacha Baron Cohen. How did a club for 'hippy Jewish scouts' become a hothouse for the entertainment industry?

A Day That Shook The World: Hindenburg airship crash

On 6 May 1937, the Hindenburg airship, one of the largest flying machines ever created, suddenly caught fire as it was coming in to land in Lakehurst, New Jersey.

My Dog Tulip (12A)

Voices of: Christopher Plummer, LynnRedgrave

Anger as playwright is denied award over his views on Israel

A New York university has withdrawn its offer of an honorary degree to the award-winning playwright Tony Kushner after a row over his views on Israel descended into accusations of slander.

Jackie Cooper: Actor who moved from child stardom to directing, and success as a studio executive

Jackie Cooper was one of Hollywood's most popular child stars, winning an Oscar nomination as best actor in 1931. He was particularly famous for the films he made with Wallace Beery, notably The Champ (1931) and Treasure Island (1934), in which he was Jim Hawkins to Beery's Long John Silver. With his pouting lower lip ever ready to quiver, his mischievous twinkle, his tousled blonde hair and his ability to cry on cue, he became a major box-office attraction. "He was everybody's little kid," the MGM contract player Ann Rutherford said. "There was just something about him you wanted to go, 'Ohh,' and help him."

There's No Home, By Alexander Baron

It's 1943 and the Allied invasion of Sicily is at full tilt. In a lull in the fighting, a British battalion marches through the heat into the heavily bombed city of Catania to be met by the women, children and old men, many of them emerging into the light after several weeks in hiding.

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Otter man Gavin Maxwell's bitter legacy

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