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Neil LaBute

Enter stage right: Meet Britain's most promising young playwrights

Despite painful arts cuts, new writing continues to flourish in British theatres. But it's not only established names who are getting plays on – from young writing schemes in regional theatres to festivals for first-timers, above-a-pub fringe spaces to career-making venues such as the Royal Court, the Bush and the Gate, brave new works by young writers are being brought to life up and down the country. On the eve of the National Theatre's 'Double Feature' season of four new plays written by and for young adults, Holly Williams talks to the leading lights of the next generation of playwrights...

Rebel rebel: Why Vincent Cassel is Europe’s most dangerous movie

He set the screen alight – and pulses racing – as Black Swan's lecherous ballet director, while as one half of Europe's movie power couple, he provoked the wrath of the Vatican. Now Vincent Cassel has a family, is he set to curb his inflammatory instincts? Not likely, he tells James Mottram

Calcutta Club stirs up colonial tensions by barring Bengali artist

One of India's most celebrated social institutions, the Calcutta Club, has sparked an angry backlash from the city's intelligentsia after refusing to allow entry to a Bengali painter who was wearing traditional clothes judged to be in breach of strict regulations.

Ibsen's 'Emperor and Galilean': a lost classic

At several points in his life, Henrik Ibsen described Emperor and Galilean, the vast historical drama that he wrote between 1868 and 1873, as his "main work", or most important play. It is, therefore, an astonishing fact that the piece is so little known and has never been staged in English. My new adaptation of the play will give audiences the chance to experience the extraordinary power of this epic piece of theatre.

DVD: Black Swan, For retail & rental (20th Century Fox)

Darren Aronofsky's exotic mix of backstage soap opera and gothic horror movie is tosh, really: being cast as the lead in Swan Lake wouldn't turn anyone into a gibbering psycho, even someone as highly strung as Natalie Portman's fledgling ballerina.

Steele forced to make U-turn on director role

There is, just about, a difference between the Rugby Football Union and Fred Karno's Army, but only in the sense that the latter deliberately set out to be funny. Yesterday, the governing body's management board – which, to the best of anyone's knowledge, has never included either Charlie Chaplin or Stan Laurel, although rumours to the contrary continue to circulate – forced their chief executive, John Steele, into a humiliating U-turn on the sensitive subject of the Twickenham performance directorship. As a consequence, the union was left looking every bit as daft as it did during the civil wars of the mid-1990s.

More headlines

Diary: Tina Fey laughs off troll slur

Tina Fey is expecting. First, a baby – her second, with husband, the composer and producer Jeff Richmond – but also further series of 30 Rock, contrary to reports, and despite the imminent departure of Alec Baldwin. If that weren't enough, there's also the publication of Bossypants, her book of autobiographical essays, for which the first US reviews are already in ("extremely funny", New York Times). Fey is most famous here for her uncanny impression of Sarah Palin during the 2008 US election. Palin may give her some well-earned time off by avoiding the 2012 race, but Fey would also be well suited to satirising Tea Party-approved potential candidate Michele Bachmann. Adored by one half of America, Fey's "Palin" earned her the ire of the other half. "Tina Fey is an ugly, pear-shaped, bitchy, over-rated troll," wrote one (probably Republican) web commenter, recalls Fey in her book. "To say I'm an overrated troll," she retorts, "when you have never even seen me guard a bridge, is patently unfair."