Arts and Entertainment

The singular comic talents of Stefan Golaszewski are mostly expended on works for television - as in Him & Her, a sitcom that applies Royle Family techniques to twentysomething slackerdom with intermittently hilarious results.

Scholar devises equation for determining a cult film

What makes a cult film? It's a question to get cinephiles spluttering over their popcorn. Should the definition be confined to the midnight-movie set that embraced El Topo and The Rocky Horror Picture Show in the 1970s, or do films such as John Hughes Breakfast Club count?

After 26 years, curtain falls on John Godber

John Godber has written the country's most frequently performed plays, but for audiences in Hull, they have appeared one too many times. The playwright has ended his 26-year formal association with one of the city's theatres in typically dramatic style after accusations of "cronyism".

Hollywood gripped by real whodunnit

Forensic evidence is slim to non-existent. They have few credible witnesses or obvious lines of inquiry. And, as if to add insult to injury, detectives investigating the high-profile murder of Hollywood publicist Ronni Chasen last week managed, quite by accident, to prompt their only potential suspect to kill himself.

Mario Monicelli: Director and screenwriter whose comedies exposed immorality and injustice in his native Italy

Mario Monicelli, often called "the father of Italian screen comedy", was one of the Italian cinemas greatest craftsmen, a director whose prolific output (over 70 films) included several masterpieces, such as the superb caper comedy I Soliti Ignoti (1958), and the biting satire La Grande Guerra (1959), which won him Venice's Golden Lion award.

Revamped BFI to take over from UK Film Council

The British Film Institute (BFI) is to become the new champion for British film, inheriting the funding responsibilities of the UK Film Council and ending a period of uncertainty for the industry.

Dylan Jones: 'Turning Truman Capote's bittersweet novel into Hollywood fare was never going to be easy'

What then, exactly, is a kook? According to Sam Wasson's engaging book, Fifth Avenue, 5am (Aurum, £15.99), which recounts the making of Breakfast at Tiffany's, it is a very particular thing indeed.

Joan Bakewell: 'Elevation is rather a grand word, isn't it?'

The broadcaster and champion of older people tells Jerome Taylor what becoming a peer will mean for her causes

Jimmy McGovern in the line of fire over Afghanistan drama

He made his name creating gritty characters, tough men grafting under pressure and battling against the odds. Now it is Jimmy McGovern, the plain-talking screenwriter behind dramas like Cracker and The Street, who has been forced into the firing line.

Phil King: When can you call yourself a playwright?

“You willy-wally wobbly words…” says Major Robbie Ross in Timberlake Wertenbaker’s play Our Country’s Good as he berates Ralph Clark, a young Second Lieutenant attempting to put on a play. But this could easily be a cry against a playwright.

Sweden return to America's Cup

Chief executive Paul Cayard confirmed Sweden’s return to the America’s Cup fray with an entry from Torbjorn Tornqvist’s Artemis team. Juan Kouyoumdjian will head the design team for the 72-foot wing sail catamarans for the 2013 event.

There Will Be More, Cock Tavern Theatre, London

Edward Bond, the most radical dramatist to emerge from the 1960s, caused outraged with his 1965 play, Saved, in which a baby is casually stoned to death in its pram by a gang of bored yobs. So when you're confronted with the sight of a baby's cot at the start of his latest play, There Will Be More, the effect is not unlike hearing someone's catchphrase or signature tune. You find yourself thinking "He can't. No, surely he can't. Can he?" Oh yes, he can.

Whatever happened to Edward Bond?

He's a genius of English theatre, but his new play is being premiered in a pub. Mark Ravenhill wonders how it went wrong

Theme Song for an Old Show, By Jeffrey Lewis

For some novels, the first-person form seems extraordinarily well chosen, and so it is here. Louie, the narrator, is a TV writer on a superior TV cop show, Northie (Lewis's own experience as a writer on Hill Street Blues no doubt comes in handy). The novel looks back at his whole life, from the time his father, a TV producer, left home for another woman, deftly laying bare the tensions this produced between Louie and both his parents; his uneasy relationships with friends, women and colleagues; the arc of his writing career; his failed attempt to preserve the integrity of his show; and his efforts to get closer to his father as his own star rises and his father's declines.

Over Gardens Out, Riverside Studios, London

Peter Gill was the founding director of the Riverside Studios, so it's fitting that the venue now hosts Good Night Out's enterprising mini-season of his first two plays.

Diary: A screenwriter writes

Aaron Sorkin, the screenwriter behind The Social Network, may not be a regular Facebook user, but he sure knows his way around a blog. Since his film's release in the US, its ecstatic reviews have been tinged with criticism of its few female characters, described by one publication as, "horrendous, like, 50s era sexist". Wounded by the claims of misogyny, Sorkin has hit back by writing a lengthy rebuttal in the comments section of television writer Ken Levine's blog.

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