News Cyclists ride in central London where the proposed SkyCycle routes would be built

The proposed plans - designed to improve safety for cyclists - would cost over £200m

Architecture: 1999 - the year of the turkey

Fuelled by lottery cash and hampered by poor planning, the past year has been a delight for connoisseurs of design disasters. By Nonie Niesewand

Letter: Glass ceilings

YOUR ARTICLE on the design flaws coming to light in the all-glass structures favoured by some architects was most welcome ("Glass shatters architects' egos", 12 December). This will hopefully allow the Government to rethink the construction of a similar building for the Greater London Authority. Sir Norman Foster's "glass headlamp" structure will place a financial burden on Londoners, especially if maintenance costs spiral out of control, at a time when money is needed to improve our transport system and tackle poverty in inner London. I feel that a brand new building is an inappropriate symbol for the GLA. If the new authority is to make a real contribution to sustainability and urban regeneration then a far more fitting symbol would be to recycle and refurbish an existing building.

Critics' Awards 1999 - Architecture: The year of the all-seeing eye

The past year has been a vintage one for architecture. After what seems like yonks of fudging and compromising, designers in Britain suddenly seem free to express themselves. Combine this with the millennium rush and lottery cash, and there have been some unique opportunities. What do we have to show for it? Well, in addition to the obvious - a very big but elegant tent on the Greenwich peninsula - the list is rather impressive.

Foster hits back over Wembley

THE ROW over the rebuilding of Wembley Stadium took yet another twist last night when Norman Foster revealed he was considering suing a rival firm of architects which criticised his design, writes Robert Mendick.

Glass shatters architects' egos

TOP ARCHITECTS' obsession with all-glass buildings has caused the biggest wave of structural failures since the 1960s when flat roofs were in vogue.

Architecture: A beauty contest with heart and soul

The Stirling Prize, awarded by the Riba, is being given not for monumental architecture but for thoughtful design and social contribution. The shortlisted work shown below demonstrates this sensitivity to function and context, while Nonie Niesewand nominates her favourite

Architecture: Building up the future is child's play

Where can you see London's new Ferris Wheel, Heathrow's Terminal Five and Wembley's twin towers all in the same building? At Legoland in Windsor, of course, where a new scheme is encouraging children to think about the built environment.

Design in Britain: Coming up with the goods

From chocolate to needle-free syringes, each Millennium Product encapsulates a specific aspect of innovative British design. By Nonie Niesewand

Architecture: Mind the gap, in a robust and lyrical way

Norman Foster's new Canary Wharf station is a masterpiece of functional elegance.

BBC plans news HQ designed by Foster

THE BBC is considering plans for a huge "super newsroom", designed by Sir Norman Foster on the South Bank in London, which would cost about pounds 20m a year in rent.
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