News Cyclists ride in central London where the proposed SkyCycle routes would be built

The proposed plans - designed to improve safety for cyclists - would cost over £200m

Built for the people - so tell the people

The public should be involved in a city's development. A centre for architecture is the answer, says Jonathan Glancey

Edinburgh bangs a drum, Glasgow belts out an aria

In rival British cities, two rival conference centres have been raised by rival architects Brian Edwards and Jonathan Glancey report on rival buildings in rival cities by two of Britain's most distinguished architects

Cambridge for insiders

Annexe

Reichstag cover-up blows Berlin life off course

STEVE CRAWSHAW

What to do with a pink elephant?

Fierce debate is raging over the Docklands print plant of the Financial Times, to be abandoned just seven years after it opened

Decision on opera house design

Zaha Hadid has been commissioned to design the proposed Cardiff Bay Opera House after an embarrassing delay by the opera house trustees, writes Jonathan Glancey.

Architects: last of the die-hard sexists Elitism lurks behind liberal facade

ARCHITECTURE is one of the last bastions of male elitism. While other professions, including medicine and the law, are now the preserve of both men and women, the architect is nearly always a man. According to a new survey, a mere 9 per cent of B ritain's 30,000 architects are women.

A lament for Barry Bucknell : LEADING ARTICLE

During the Eighties, the massive DIY store became synonymous with the fashionable virtues of thrift, hard work and aspiration. Every second ad on the television featured chaps in white coats dancing round a warehouse, or corduroy-clad hearties sla pping sealant on window frames. B&Q and Do It All left more of a mark on the material fabric of British life than Richard Rogers and Norman Foster. From pebble-dash to coloured stone cladding, the exterior signs of DIY culture are everywhere.

A monumental spot of local trouble

The people of Cardiff were to have an opera house. A competition was he ld, an architect was selected. Then the people of Cardiff took against Zaha Hadid. Jonathan Glancey reports

Opera house design winner rebuffed

The dramatic competition winning design for the proposed National Opera House for Wales at Cardiff Bay has been effectively rejected by the Welsh National Opera Trust. The trust announced yesterday afternoon that it intended to rerun the second, design stage of the competition, pitting the winner, Zaha Hadid, against Sir Norman Foster and Partners and Manfredi Nicoletti, runners-up to Hadid.

BUILDING OF THE YEAR : Architecture worth arguing over

The most popular film-maker in history got into history, and stayed popular. Glyndebourne rose again, handsomely. Pop ate itself, but survived. Steve Coogan was everywhere, and so was Hugh Grant; only one of them is praised here. The theatre had a thin time, but television drama serials made up for it. People defined themselves on Mondays at 9pm: were you for `Cracker' or `Chuzzlewit'? And again on Saturdays at 8pm: did you really believe that a 14m-1 shot would win?(Or did you do it for love of the arts?) It wasn't the best of years, but it had its moments. And here they are, in the fourth annual `IoS' Awards

ARTS / How should we celebrate the millennium?

IT'S LIKE one of those Reader's Digest competitions: if you were given pounds 250,000, how would you spend it? Only this time, we're talking pounds 1.6bn, roughly 20 per cent of the proceeds of the National Lottery. The nine members of the government-appointed Millennium Commission has been asked to spend other people's money, which must be near the top of everyone's list of Fun Things To Do. The proviso is that the money should be spent on projects that are 'of the millennium'. The problem is that no one, least of all the commission, can decide what that means. All too aware of the demands of posterity (who wants to be remembered for having made the wrong decision?), the commissioners are touring the country before making up their minds. The Millennium Commission is inaptly named. The one thing they cannot do is commission: all proposals must be submitted from outside. The heavies have already weighed in: English National Opera, the Royal Opera House, the South Bank Centre and the Tate Gallery have drawn up mouthwatering proposals. As the judges begin their task, DAVID BENEDICT asks a selection of the great, the good and the frankly greedy to offer their suggestions for the spending spree of the century . . .

Whatever's happened to Hartlepool?: A new 'historic' seaport, a mall with Versace and Armani, a marina and a museum designed by Norman Foster. Jonathan Glancey meets the man with a pounds 1bn plan for Teesside

Duncan Hall waves a proprietorial hand and gold cuff link at rows of gleaming American-style shops: 'Just look at this. They've never had a McDonald's or a Toys 'R' us up here before. The big retailers haven't wanted to know about this part of the country. Now they're all crowding in: Allders, Do-it-All, you name it . . . . . we've spent pounds 15 a square foot above the national average building these shops; we're going for the best.'

Profile: Nuts and bolts of genius: From industrial sheds to the British Museum: Laurence Marks on an architect in demand - Sir Norman Foster

SIR Norman Foster, who has won the competition to redesign the heart of the British Museum, practises architecture in an enormous glass-walled room on the river at Battersea from which all colour, passion and ambiguity have been resolutely excluded. You walk up a broad and stately staircase and arrive in a sealed, luminous space 200ft long, 70ft deep and two storeys high overlooking the water. Surfaces are black, white and grey, shapes hard-edged and rectangular. Only a chaste bunch of blue delphiniums relieves the monochrome of this temple to pure reason.

Royal Albert Hall withdraws from joint development

THE Royal Albert Hall has withdrawn from the planned pounds 170m Albertopolis development in London, under the architect Sir Norman Foster.
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