Arts and Entertainment

Manchester Academy

Rock dinosaurs claw in the cash

Money, it's a gas. Grab that

CENTREFOLD / Young at heart: Virgin Records is 21. Are you ready to celebrate?

Nobody really minds that Thorn EMI owns it; Virgin is still thought of as the baby of Richard Branson, the upstart grammar-school boy running his business out of a phone box, or the bloke in jumper and jeans, a sort of Noel Edmonds with a brain. Can't get excited about the paper bit in the middle of a record? (Most collections are stashed in the garage anyway). Well, to remind you of what a good time you had, Virgin has crafted the anniversary celebrations to suit your lifestyle.

Production Notes: Andy Parfitt, R1's commissioning editor, mixed in poetry with the pop last week. Here, he explains how

THE ACTUAL week was to do with the New Generation Poets, but we didn't want just unfamiliar poetry. So we did go for the McGoughs, Hegleys and Zephaniahs, then we also put in Shakespeare and Shelley.

MUSIC / Overflowing with Eastern promise: Is Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan the best singer in the world today? Geoff Dyer argues the case for the master of Islamic song

IN ISLAMIC countries, in the desert, it sometimes seems as if the call to prayer, although issuing from the minaret, is actually summoned into being by the vastness of the sky. As if the call is itself a response to the immensity of the surrounding silence . . .

One man, his dog and two Oscars: Nick Park's animated films have earned him two Oscars and plenty of creature comforts - and the novelty has yet to wear off, writes Jim White

Nick Park opened the glass front of the display cabinet in his Bristol studio. 'Go on. You hold them.'

'Green' MacGregor bulldozes on

THE ASSAULT on England's wildest and most beautiful countryside will be intensified by cuts in the road programme presented as 'environmentally friendly', a surveyfor the Independent on Sunday reveals.

Records: Soundtracks special

A Bronx Tale (Epic, CD/tape). A good example of the soundtrack a l'American Graffiti, in which the director plays disc jockey, with the cinema as his sound system. There are times during Robert De Niro's directorial debut when the choices make you laugh out loud with approval: the boy protagonist who begins the movie in 1956 to the Cleftones' 'Little Girl of Mine' would certainly have been listening to the Impressions' 'I'm So Proud' in 1964 and the Rascals' 'A Beautiful Morning' in 1968. Not so sure about 'Nights in White Satin', mind, but when Donald Byrd's 'Cristo Redentor' turns up, it puts you in a mood to forgive anything. Richard Williams

Style: The Way I Was: Finally I faced the music: Robert Fripp tells Nicholas Roe of his decision to become a working musician once more

IF I GO back to 1967, I'd moved to London to become a professional musician. In 1969, after two years of misery, poverty and ignominy, King Crimson went from less than nowhere to international prominence within a year. At that period, for three months, it was the most powerful rock group in the world. Jimi Hendrix was jumping up and down at his table at the Revolution Club saying: 'This is the best band in the world.' I was just turned 23 and this was Hendrix jumping up and down. And he was right. At that time it was the best group in the world - but only for three months.

Womad

THE winners of the Womad Competition were J Gethin of Clyne, F Meehan of Chorlton-cum-Hardy and R Gracey of Spalding. It was Youssou N'Dour who duetted with Peter Gabriel on 'Shaking the Tree'. The winners receive tickets for this week's Cornish Womad.

ROCK / Buying the planet: Thanks to the angel Gabriel, Womad is back at full strength

EIGHT months after the second potentially terminal cash crisis of its 12-year career, the restructured Womad organisation is half way through a distinctly healthy 1993 festival season without even the nuisance of having to reconvene Genesis. In 1982, it took a specially-staged reunion concert by Peter Gabriel's former group to pay off the losses of the first Womad event. Now a new rescue package has brought even closer the converging paths of Gabriel and the world music outfit.

ROCK / Oh, and the songs were good, too: Joseph Gallivan on Peter Gabriel's mobile performance at Earls Court

It wasn't enough to come away from the latest Peter Gabriel theatre-meets-rock extravaganza whistling the set - real men were quoting the statistics. 'Apparently he used five kilometres of cable,' said a young man to his date as they left the arena. His memory served him well. The enduring image of this wonderful show came in the opening seconds. Gabriel was revealed in a Genesis-era red telephone box, singing the opening track of his recent US album, 'Come Talk to Me'; he then walked agonisingly slowly down the 20m runway, stretching the black wire behind him. The elfin figure towards whom he strode stood hunched in the dark on the circular 'other' stage. A gasp of delight went up with the spotlights as it was revealed to be Sinead O'Connor: - Walkman on as usual, barefoot and elegant. Gabriel's cultured, airy tones were perfectly complemented by her angelic caterwaul. In less than two minutes the drome had been catapulted into an intense emotional state.

People: Going Dutch on LSD

ALLEGATIONS of youthful drug use have finally hit Dutch politics, but in the tolerant Netherlands they are more a credential than a concern. In Broadcasting Magazine, the columnist Arie Kleijwegt, recalled how he and the Culture Minister, Hedy d'Ancona, had taken LSD together in the 1960s.

Peace concerts

(First Edition)

ART / Breaking out of the box: Peter Gabriel asked 11 artists to respond to tracks on Us, an album he wrote to deal with his failed relationships. He tells Dalya Alberge of plans to improve relations between music and visual art

At an exhibition organised by Peter Gabriel, people walking around with headphones on may be listening, not to a recorded guide, but to music. The former lead singer of Genesis is exploring the potential of bringing music into the art gallery, breaking down the unnatural divide between the art forms.

My Record Collection: ANDY PARTRIDGE - XTC

THE FIRST RECORD I BOUGHT
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