Arts and Entertainment

The Orange Prize winner Suzanne Berne is on familiar ground with her fifth novel examining life in an affluent American village. Littlefield, Massachusetts, is named one of the 10 best places to live in America. Curiously, it also houses an unusually high number of psychotherapists. Clarice Watkins, a sociologist from the University of Chicago, decides to study Littlefield to find out exactly what makes it such a good place to live. She arrives to find a town at war, split between those who want their dogs to be off the leash in the local park and those who object. Opinions become more polarised when someone starts poisoning dogs and an undercurrent of fear pulses through the community.

Paul Gascoigne pictured in November last year at a Lazio match

Paul Gascoigne continues to receive hospital treatment in the United States

The former England midfielder travelled to a clinic in Arizona last week

Unexpected Lessons in Love, By Bernardine Bishop

Rules of attraction and affection come under cool scrutiny in this novel of modern manners

Paperback review: Some Kind of Peace, By Camilla Grebe and Asa Traff (trs by Paul Norlen)

The sudden blooming of Nordic crime thrillers is comparable with the efflorescence of Swedish tennis players in the Seventies and Eighties.

IoS Books of the Year: Page-turners

Jaw-dropping turns and killer twists

Cameron at the PMQs: 'We are raising money for the rich'

David Cameron's rather embarrassing Freudian slip...

Scientists remain divided about the true effects of ecstasy

Ecstasy helps post-traumatic stress

The dance drug ecstasy can help people suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to benefit from psychotherapy, researchers have found.

Stigma of mental ill health is 'worse than the illness'

Sufferers are shunned, taunted and abused, claims an international study of the problem
California Governor Jerry Brown called the therapies ‘quackery’

Sexual 'conversion' therapy unethical, pscyhotherapists told

Psychotherapists have been told by their biggest professional body that it is unethical for them to try to “convert” people from being gay to straight.

Viggo Mortensen and Michael Fassbender as Sigmind Freud and Dr Carl Jung

DVD & Blu-Ray: A Dangerous Method (15)

"Angels always speak in German, it's traditional," maintains fledgling shrink Dr Carl Jung (Michael Fassbender, who appears half-asleep here) to his deranged patient, Sabina (Keira Knightley, trying her best).

Bursts of joy break up the mainly bleak 'Viktor'

Pina Bausch: World Cities, Sadler's Wells & Barbican Theatre, London

What better way to celebrate the Cultural Olympiad than by staging the late, great Pina Bausch's searching, spectacular portraits of 10 world cities?

Gillian Wearing's '2 into 1' (1997)

A YBA who's still causing a big sensation

The Whitechapel Gallery in east London is holding the first major retrospective of Gillian Wearing. Adrian Hamilton is moved by her deeply affecting films and photographs

Jocky Wilson retired at the age of 45, having lost all the money he had earned from the game, and became a recluse

Jocky Wilson: World champion darts player famed for drinking and his unhealthy lifestyle

Jocky Wilson was a legend as a darts player, as a television character and because of the legendarily large amounts of lager and vodka he knocked back during tournaments.

Abuse victim secretly records accused priest’s ‘confession

An Italian man who suffered what he claims was clerical sex abuse as a 14-year-old has secretly recorded his attacker, now a senior Sicilian church figure, appearing to admit the crimes in a chilling case that throws the spotlight on the wider issue of clerical paedophilia in Italy, which many observers say is still being swept under the carpet.

Book Of A Lifetime: Shaking a Leg, By Angela Carter

It is her fairy stories that are credited with changing people's lives. It is her novels for which her prose gets most praise. Angela Carter refashioned the docility of fairy-tale heroines - Sleeping Beauty, she observed, did not have much "get up and go" ­ and invented creatures who were wild and wilful. She gave fictional prose a good going-over with her rich swerves between fantasy and realism. Yet it is her journalism, collected in the 1997 volume 'Shaking a Leg', to which I find myself returning again and again, struck freshly by its forthrightness, its imagination, its unpredictability - and by the sheer range of subjects on which she was fluent.

Brought to book: two of Orton and Halliwell's defaced dust covers

Orton's life and crimes

The trial of the great playwright, jailed for defacing library books, is being re-examined. By James Kidd

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Woman who was sent to three Nazi death camps describes how she escaped the gas chamber

Auschwitz liberation 70th anniversary

Woman sent to three Nazi death camps describes surviving gas chamber
DSK, Dodo the Pimp, and the Carlton Hotel

The inside track on France's trial of the year

Dominique Strauss-Kahn, Dodo the Pimp, and the Carlton Hotel:
As provocative now as they ever were

Sarah Kane season

Why her plays are as provocative now as when they were written
Murder of Japanese hostage has grim echoes of a killing in Iraq 11 years ago

Murder of Japanese hostage has grim echoes of another killing

Japanese mood was against what was seen as irresponsible trips to a vicious war zone
Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea