Arts and Entertainment

The Orange Prize winner Suzanne Berne is on familiar ground with her fifth novel examining life in an affluent American village. Littlefield, Massachusetts, is named one of the 10 best places to live in America. Curiously, it also houses an unusually high number of psychotherapists. Clarice Watkins, a sociologist from the University of Chicago, decides to study Littlefield to find out exactly what makes it such a good place to live. She arrives to find a town at war, split between those who want their dogs to be off the leash in the local park and those who object. Opinions become more polarised when someone starts poisoning dogs and an undercurrent of fear pulses through the community.

Paul Gascoigne pictured in November last year at a Lazio match

Paul Gascoigne continues to receive hospital treatment in the United States

The former England midfielder travelled to a clinic in Arizona last week

Unexpected Lessons in Love, By Bernardine Bishop

Rules of attraction and affection come under cool scrutiny in this novel of modern manners

Paperback review: Some Kind of Peace, By Camilla Grebe and Asa Traff (trs by Paul Norlen)

The sudden blooming of Nordic crime thrillers is comparable with the efflorescence of Swedish tennis players in the Seventies and Eighties.

IoS Books of the Year: Page-turners

Jaw-dropping turns and killer twists

Cameron at the PMQs: 'We are raising money for the rich'

David Cameron's rather embarrassing Freudian slip...

Scientists remain divided about the true effects of ecstasy

Ecstasy helps post-traumatic stress

The dance drug ecstasy can help people suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to benefit from psychotherapy, researchers have found.

Stigma of mental ill health is 'worse than the illness'

Sufferers are shunned, taunted and abused, claims an international study of the problem
California Governor Jerry Brown called the therapies ‘quackery’

Sexual 'conversion' therapy unethical, pscyhotherapists told

Psychotherapists have been told by their biggest professional body that it is unethical for them to try to “convert” people from being gay to straight.

Viggo Mortensen and Michael Fassbender as Sigmind Freud and Dr Carl Jung

DVD & Blu-Ray: A Dangerous Method (15)

"Angels always speak in German, it's traditional," maintains fledgling shrink Dr Carl Jung (Michael Fassbender, who appears half-asleep here) to his deranged patient, Sabina (Keira Knightley, trying her best).

Bursts of joy break up the mainly bleak 'Viktor'

Pina Bausch: World Cities, Sadler's Wells & Barbican Theatre, London

What better way to celebrate the Cultural Olympiad than by staging the late, great Pina Bausch's searching, spectacular portraits of 10 world cities?

Gillian Wearing's '2 into 1' (1997)

A YBA who's still causing a big sensation

The Whitechapel Gallery in east London is holding the first major retrospective of Gillian Wearing. Adrian Hamilton is moved by her deeply affecting films and photographs

Jocky Wilson retired at the age of 45, having lost all the money he had earned from the game, and became a recluse

Jocky Wilson: World champion darts player famed for drinking and his unhealthy lifestyle

Jocky Wilson was a legend as a darts player, as a television character and because of the legendarily large amounts of lager and vodka he knocked back during tournaments.

Abuse victim secretly records accused priest’s ‘confession

An Italian man who suffered what he claims was clerical sex abuse as a 14-year-old has secretly recorded his attacker, now a senior Sicilian church figure, appearing to admit the crimes in a chilling case that throws the spotlight on the wider issue of clerical paedophilia in Italy, which many observers say is still being swept under the carpet.

Book Of A Lifetime: Shaking a Leg, By Angela Carter

It is her fairy stories that are credited with changing people's lives. It is her novels for which her prose gets most praise. Angela Carter refashioned the docility of fairy-tale heroines - Sleeping Beauty, she observed, did not have much "get up and go" ­ and invented creatures who were wild and wilful. She gave fictional prose a good going-over with her rich swerves between fantasy and realism. Yet it is her journalism, collected in the 1997 volume 'Shaking a Leg', to which I find myself returning again and again, struck freshly by its forthrightness, its imagination, its unpredictability - and by the sheer range of subjects on which she was fluent.

Brought to book: two of Orton and Halliwell's defaced dust covers

Orton's life and crimes

The trial of the great playwright, jailed for defacing library books, is being re-examined. By James Kidd

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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine