Arts and Entertainment

The Orange Prize winner Suzanne Berne is on familiar ground with her fifth novel examining life in an affluent American village. Littlefield, Massachusetts, is named one of the 10 best places to live in America. Curiously, it also houses an unusually high number of psychotherapists. Clarice Watkins, a sociologist from the University of Chicago, decides to study Littlefield to find out exactly what makes it such a good place to live. She arrives to find a town at war, split between those who want their dogs to be off the leash in the local park and those who object. Opinions become more polarised when someone starts poisoning dogs and an undercurrent of fear pulses through the community.

Christina Patterson: Let's ditch this gold-diggers' free-for-all

I've always felt a bit sorry for Mrs Bennet. It was all very well for Mr Bennet to cast his eyes to heaven, and sigh and sneer over her fluttering, and her whittering, and her desperate, all-consuming, excruciating desire to get her daughters married off. But what was she meant to do? She had five daughters and no money. Their market value was waning by the day. And he wasn't offering any helpful solutions.

GMTV's Kate Garraway in 'bubble of bliss' over new son

GMTV presenter Kate Garraway said today that she was in a "little bubble of bliss" after the birth of her second child.

All in the Mind, By Alastair Campbell

The willing suspension of disbelief is more vital than usual for readers of this debut novel, since it purports to be an intense and sensitive psychological drama but is written by a man generally seen as a bully and a brute.

Observations: Time to get to the pointe

This Sunday, The Royal Ballet's Tamara Rojo will look at dance from a new perspective, discussing her work with psychoanalyst Luis Rodríguez de la Sierra at London Metropolitan University. The event is part of "Connecting Conversations", a series of talks bringing together psychoanalysis and other fields. They will compare choreography with psychoanalysis, while looking at psychological themes in ballet.

Derek Draper: You Ask The Questions

The editor of LabourList.org and psychotherapist answers your questions, such as 'So is Labour doomed?' and 'What therapy would you offer Brown?'

A Quiet Adjustment, By Benjamin Markovits

The second in Benjamin Markovits's trilogy on the life of Lord Byron concerns a scandal that rocked the poet's reputation early on in his career. Arabella Milbanke, 19, is introduced to Bryon. Attracted to the feted author, she agrees to his proposal of marriage, suspecting his libertine ways will force her "to draw new breath".

Darkness Rising, By Frank Tallis

A Freudian PI returns in this historical thriller

Something to Tell You, By Hanif Kureishi

A teeming novel that draws on all the author's talent for comic discovery, Something to Tell You describes the trajectory of Jamal Khan as he matures from a left-wing wannabe into a middle-aged flaneur, a psychoanalyst for whom "secrets are my currency".

Jail where inmates are on first-name terms honoured

Longford award for prison accused of being too soft with prisoners

Child prostitution: suitable material for a musical?

By Rhoda Koenig

The Sketch: A full investigation is the last thing the Government needs

Our back-from-the-brink PM got a yelp of welcome from one of his bench monkeys. He's back on form. Dogged. Sullen. Random, wolfy grin. And, at the end of every answer, a punch, a poke in the eye, a political point. That got him in trouble at the end.

Many Britons fattist bullies, survey shows

Fat-related jibes are "endemic" among Britons with nine out of 10 overweight people experiencing name-calling because of their excess pounds, researchers said today.

My Style: Sue Cubitt

Occupation Psychotherapist. Age Ungallant to ask. Personal style Efficiency chic
Arts and Entertainment
The eyes have it: Kate Bush
music
Arts and Entertainment
booksNovelist takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Arts and Entertainment
Al Pacino in ‘The Humbling’, as an ageing actor
filmHam among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
News
Fifi Trixibelle Geldof with her mother, Paula Yates, in 1985
people
Sport
Mario Balotelli in action during his Liverpool debut
football ...but he can't get on the scoresheet in impressive debut
Environment
Pigeons have been found with traces of cocaine and painkillers in their system
environmentCan species be 'de-extincted'?
Arts and Entertainment
booksExclusive extract from Howard Jacobson’s acclaimed new novel
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
A Pilgrim’s Progress is described by its publisher as “the one-and-only definitive record” of David Hockney's life and works
people
Sport
Loic Remy signs for Chelsea
footballBlues wrap up deal on the eve of the transfer window
Career Services

Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

The big names to look for this fashion week

This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
Al Pacino wows Venice

Al Pacino wows Venice

Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

Neil Lawson Baker interview

‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor