News An email exchange in April 2011 between Rebekah Brooks and her husband, Charles Brooks, referred to her losing an iPad

One phone on the list may have been a duplicate, another may have belonged to someone else and one iPad may have been lost

RIM looks at ways to ease fears over BlackBerrys

Research in Motion (RIM) has agreed to some of the demands of emerging market governments to curb uses for its BlackBerry smartphones, including banning access to certain websites to users in Kuwait and reaching a compromise that will allow security services in India to monitor traffic.

BlackBerry faces new government crackdowns on phone use

The use of BlackBerrys will be banned throughout the United Arab Emirates, raising the stakes in the country's confrontation with the smartphone's maker, Research in Motion (RIM), for the second time in 24 hours.

BlackBerry users in UAE and Saudi may have services cut

More than a million BlackBerry users may have key services in Saudi Arabia and the UAE cut off after authorities stepped up demands on smartphone maker Research In Motion for access to encrypted messages sent over the device.

UAE 'security' curbs for BlackBerry phones

The United Arab Emirates said yesterday it will block key features on BlackBerry smartphones, citing national security concerns because the devices operate beyond the government's ability to monitor their use, and officials in neighbouring Saudi Arabia indicated it planned to follow suit.

UAE to block many BlackBerry services in October

The United Arab Emirates said today it plans to block some messaging and Web services on BlackBerry smart phones, days after it warned the device could pose a potential threat to national security and social values.

Samsung say signal problems an Apple iPhone-only issue

Samsung Electronics said today that it has received no significant complaints related to smartphone signal reception after Apple said the issue was shared by the entire smartphone industry.

£30,000 Defra equipment lost or stolen

Some 41 laptops were among electronic equipment worth more than £30,000 that went missing from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) last year, figures showed today.

Special schools should be kept, urges disabled MP

Britain's first MP with cerebral palsy has made an impassioned plea to the Government not to close special schools in its overhaul of the education system. Paul Maynard, the Conservative MP for Blackpool North and Cleveleys, said he hopes to inspire other people with disabilities to pursue a career in politics.

BlackBerry 'considering tablet PC to rival Apple iPad'

Research in Motion (RIM), which makes BlackBerry smartphones, is thought to be trialling a portable device to compete with Apple's iPad, possibly one of a series of tablet computers coming to market this year.

Three jailed over Blackberry killing

Three robbers were jailed for nine years each today for killing a man for his BlackBerry phone which they sold for £60 and a chicken dinner.

US sales of Android mobile phones surge past Apple in the first quarter

Sales of mobile phones that run Google's Android operating system (OS), including the Motorola Droid and Google's own Nexus One, outstripped the iPhone in America for the first time between January and March.

British tech firms report signs of revival

Strong performances by the British computer chip makers CSR and Wolfson Microelectronics at the start of the year, as well as solid updates from several domestic software companies, have raised hopes that the UK technology industry will shake off the worst of the downturn this year.

Microsoft prepares for latest phone experiment

Microsoft will show off its latest mobile phones on Monday, but don't expect a direct rival to the iPhone.

Microsoft think pink to crack mobile market

Microsoft is set to announce its long-awaited "Project Pink" phones early next week, sources familiar with the matter said yesterday, as the world's largest software company attempts to gain traction in the growing market for young smartphone users.

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