Arts and Entertainment

Some great authors have published their worst works from beyond the grave. A few though, keep getting better when they’re dead, such as the Chilean novelist and short story writer, Roberto Bolaño. His seminal five-part novel, 2666, came out posthumously, won the National Book Critics Circle Award and convinced the world he was not just a master of the short form but could put out his life’s best work at nearly 900 pages, even after death.

The Golden Apples, By Eudora Welty

Golden, delicious, and plenty to chew on

Burning Bright, By Ron Rash

The quest for dignity, even in adversity

The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis

Economical, but never short of the mark

Invisible Ink: No 88 - Loren D Estleman

I count at least 65 novels and hundreds of short stories to date in Loren D Estleman's Chandleresque output. Not bad for a guy who works on an old manual typewriter. He's been described as "the Stravinsky of hard-boiled prose", whatever that means, but his career to date is better summed up by The Boston Globe, which says that he's "a true professional, a writer of a sort increasingly rare ... so given to his work as to spontaneously combust to genius".

Is David Eagleman the cleverest man in America?

The professor of neurology, bestselling writer and former stand-up comedian wants to change the way we think about thinking. Guy Adams meets the Malcolm Gladwell of brain science

Best British Short Stories 2011, Edited by Nicholas Royle

Slip this lightweight but nourishing anthology into your holiday bag. Editor Royle has selected 20 published stories from British writers. His own (excellent) taste means that little explosions of weirdness or transcendence often erupt amid much well-observed everyday life.

Free Radicals: The Secret Anarchy of Science, By Michael Brooks<br/>Litmus: Short Stories from Modern Science, Edited by Ra Page

These days science is either nothing or it's the new religion. But, as both these books show in their different ways, the practice of science inhabits the broad territory between these extremes and exhibits the full Monty of human behaviour. Science is the most reliable form of knowledge we have but it is arrived at by unreliable means. Cutting-edge research deals with the unknown unknowns, as the unwitting philosopher of science Donald Rumsfeld put it, and there is no formula or methodology for achieving that.

The Week In Radio: In short, cutting stories is bad news for the BBC

The silly season is abolished, the news agenda is bulging and words like "armageddon" are thrown around whenever anyone discusses the economy. Yet at times even the most hardened news junkie can feel like they have overdosed on current affairs. You may recognise the symptoms. A gnat's attention span, coupled with the compulsion to be in constant touch with the news agenda and to relay it to others via Twitter. And this addiction – for that is what it is – is enabled by an ever-increasing stream of fresh, up-to-the-minute information. Current affairs creep is all around us. The latest instance, however, is causing controversy.

Fry joins push to save Radio 4 short stories

Stephen Fry is the latest writer to join a campaign protesting against Radio 4's planned cull of its short story content.

Cryonics pioneer goes into the deep freeze at 92

A love of sci-fi and amazement at his medical treatment inspired him to write about resurrection after freezing

George R R Martin: Tolkien for the 21st century

With his fantasy books selling by the million, he'll be first choice for many a beach-read this summer. But the power behind 'Game of Thrones' provides depth as well as furious entertainment

Outcry as Radio 4 stops broadcasting short stories

Radio 4, the world's biggest commissioner of short stories, is to cut its broadcast output from three a week to one a week.

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Homeless Veterans Christmas Appeal: Drifting and forgotten - turning lives around for ex-soldiers

Homeless Veterans Christmas Appeal: Turning lives around for ex-soldiers

Our partner charities help veterans on the brink – and get them back on their feet
Putin’s far-right ambition: Think-tank reveals how Russian President is wooing – and funding – populist parties across Europe to gain influence in the EU

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Tove Jansson's Moominland: What was the inspiration for Finland's most famous family?

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24-Hour party person

Photographer Richard Young has been snapping celebrities at play for 40 years. As his latest book is released, he reveals that it wasn’t all fun and games
Michelle Obama's school dinners: America’s children have a message for the First Lady

A taste for rebellion

US children have started an online protest against Michelle Obama’s drive for healthy school meals by posting photos of their lunches
Colouring books for adults: How the French are going crazy for Crayolas

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Jack Thorne's play 'Hope': What would you do as a local politician faced with an impossible choice of cuts?

What would you do as a local politician faced with an impossible choice of cuts?

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Ed Harcourt on Romeo Beckham and life as a court composer at Burberry

Call me Ed Mozart

Paloma Faith, Lana del Ray... Romeo Beckham. Ed Harcourt has proved that he can write for them all. But it took a personal crisis to turn him from indie star to writer-for-hire
10 best stocking fillers for foodies

Festive treats: 10 best stocking fillers for foodies

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Phil Hughes head injury: He had one weakness – it has come back to haunt him

Phil Hughes had one weakness – it has come back to haunt him

Prolific opener had world at his feet until Harmison and Flintoff bounced him
'I have an age of attraction that starts as low as four': How do you deal with a paedophile who has never committed a crime?

'I am a paedophile'

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How bad do you have to be to lose a Home Office contract?

Serco given Yarl’s Wood immigration contract despite ‘vast failings’
Green Party on the march in Bristol: From a lost deposit to victory

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'It just came to us, why not do it naked?'

London's first nude free runner captured in breathtaking images across capital