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As drug fiends usually know, peyote is a Mexican cactus with hallucinogenic properties; the visions it conjures are so strong that a religious cult once sprang up to worship it. And a pretty hefty restaurant cult has appeared in the UK that worships simple Mexican cuisine.

Birds may use cigarette ends to protect chicks

It sounds like a surreal urban myth: birds in cities may be deliberately incorporating cigarette ends into their nests to ward off insect parasites. But scientists in Mexico offer compelling evidence that it is true.

WWII code experts called in to help solve mystery of the pigeon’s foot

GCHQ turn to Bletchley Park veterans for help with D-Day cipher

I'm A Celebrity: Nadine Dorries munches her way through camel toe and ostrich anus

Suspended Tory MP Nadine Dorries got her teeth into life in the jungle by chomping on a camel's toe and an ostrich's anus in her latest stomach-churning challenge on I'm A Celebrity ... Get Me Out Of Here.

Green Man and French Horn, 54 St Martin's Lane, London WC2

I didn't do too much research before setting off for lunch at Green Man and French Horn. All I knew – all I needed to know – before piling in to this Covent Garden newcomer at the earliest opportunity was that a) it's the latest opening from those clever young chaps behind Terroirs, and b) they are very good at creating fine places to eat.

Birds still at risk from lead poisoning despite shotgun laws

Lead poisoning is still a major cause of death among swans, ducks and other waterfowl despite legislation aimed at restricting the use of toxic lead pellets by shotgun owners, a study has found.

Cheer up! It’s Not the End of the World .., Edinburgh Printmakers

According to the Mayan calendar, we have until 21 December and that’s it. With that in mind, Norman and Sarah Manning Shaw have collected apocalyptic images from Damien Hirst, Andy Warhol and younger artists such as American Ricky Allman whom they discovered on the internet.

Scott Lidgett: inspired a generation of British publicists

Helen Scott Lidgett: PR supremo for major cultural institutions

In 1991, a sculpture by Patricia Finch called Golders Hill Girl was unveiled in a north London park. Dressed in bronze flip-flops and hot pants, the work is arresting for its unusual mix of glamour and informality. The same might have been said of Helen Scott Lidgett, née Finch, who sat for the piece for her mother and has died of ovarian cancer at 63.

Bignon says: 'I like The Square in Mayfair - it is classic French cuisine and the tastes are very clear'

Arnaud Bignon: 'The smell of broccoli is enough to make me want to leave a room'

My earliest food memory… Cooking with my mother and grandmother. My mother taught me how to do classic things such as make an apple tart, while my grandmother would cook a big meal every Sunday for 10 or 15 people, which I would help with. They had a lot of animals, and they would often kill a chicken or rabbit and cook that. But my favourite childhood dish was yoghurt cake. It was incredibly simple, but that's what you appreciate when you're young.

Dan Biggar kicked the decisive conversion for Ospreys in Dublin

Williams bows out by sealing final win for Ospreys

Leinster 30 Ospreys 31

Michael McCarthy: Real Spring starts this Sunday

I wrote recetly that four is not really a sufficient number for seasons, with mid-March, for example, being neither spring proper nor late winter, but something in between. And the spring's true heart also does not fit with the traditional versions. As far as I am concerned, spring in southern England, where I live, begins this Sunday, 15 April.

After 8,000 miles, Martin the cuckoo is almost home

It's nearly here, the best-loved sound of spring, the double note of the cuckoo: in fact, it's in southern Spain, on the last leg of a 4,000-mile journey from Central Africa.

Cate Blanchett plays Lotte in <i>Big and Small</i>

Heads up: Big and Small

Let the bright one in. Blanchett sizes up the London stage

Norwich win sends Bolton back into relegation zone

Norwich 2 Bolton 0

Chris the cuckoo: the birds were fitted with satellite transmitters

Extraordinary rendezvous of the migrating cuckoos

Researchers track five birds on their 3,000 mile journey to same area in central Africa

James Lyon-Shaw, ETM Group's executive chef prepares the boar at The White Swan gastropub

Boar necessities: Two restaurant-owning brothers are hunting down top-notch meat

The brothers have taken the business of acquiring meat into their own hands. Jamie Merrill joins them in the hunt.

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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003